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12:32 AM
Nice view of the crescent moon and Venus tonight.
Not bad for a quick snap. Didn't feel like setting up the tripod and all that.
1:09 AM
@Robusto Éala éarendel / engla beorhtast, // ofer middangeard / monnum sended
 
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3:20 AM
 
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7:24 AM
7:53 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at beginning of answer (34): What is the origin of "Panama schedule"? by PARTH on english.SE
 
3 hours later…
10:24 AM
@CowperKettle once they figured out the manufacturing process they went at it hammer and tongs. The UK used to be lush with green forests, but now the economy is built on a house of cards.
 
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1:13 PM
@MattE.Эллен LIterally.
Cards of paper
1:26 PM
> The name Chicxulub is from the Yucatec Maya language meaning 'the devil's flea'.
> An important morphophonological process in Yucatec Maya is the dissimilation of identical consonants next to each other by debuccalizing to avoid geminate consonants.
Word of the day: debuccalization
> intervocalically, as in a number of English varieties (e.g. litter [ˈlɪʔə])
Some people pronounce litter with the glottal stop, as in uh oh?
Never knew that.
1:59 PM
@CowperKettle It's not the standard pronunciation, but it is becoming more and more common and mostly younger people. Many 50% of the kids these days (<40yo) use /?/, but you probably won't hear it by newscasters. The most common American thing is to use the alveolar flap.
@tchrist You should just go ahead and answer that question
@Mitch Why, because nobody else understands that English doesn't have middle-voiced impersonal semi-passives the way languages like Portuguese and Spanish do have?
Pues se me ocurre que yo sí la podría contestar, pero por falta de ganas y de tiempo no me apetece lo bastante como para hacerlo.
Where me is the dative of person for the interested party; to wit, me.
You can't translate that one exactly, for the selfsame reason behind the OP's puzzle: ie, the form just doesn't exist in English. Here I might choose a verb for translation: I suppose I could answer it. But you can also do an impersonal "it" thing in English: It occurs to me that I could answer answer it. There's also no direct translation for using the positive particle for English. Sometimes you can use "do" for that one but not here. You'd have to put the verb into italic emphasis.
I almost feel like this question would be better on pt.se but I don't know that the OP actually speaks Portuguese at all. For all I know, they might be Russian.
Translation is a really complex topic.
And questions that amount to little more than "I don't understand" or "Explain all this to me" are often poor matches for the SE Q&A format.
Oh, and good luck finding a translation for what a gana is. It is not a "gain". Word-by-word translation would fail itself to you completely here, as it so often does.
My lattermost sentence is what happens when you attempt to do so. :)
Aquí se te fallaría una traducción por palabras.
That's of course another illustration of what's happening in that question, where the impersonal half-passive almost always results in VS inversion.
None of this can be answered by a monoglot anglophone.
2:51 PM
@Mitch nice. I see what you did there :D
3:09 PM
@MattE.Эллен haha. excellent. um... my eyesight is fading... could you tell me what I did there?
@tchrist You have more than one Iberian glot than any of us else here.
I can't tell if it's a question about the specific phrase 'analisou-se' or if it's about Munday's interpretation, or if it is about Baker's interpretation.
I thought @Lambie should try also.
Fingernails grow at about 0.9-1.0 nm per second. So in order to imagine the size of a modern-era CPU transistor, look at your nail for 7 to 22 seconds. This growth will cover the majority of current transistor sizes.
I have an old computer I built in 2016, and its CPU has a transistor size of 14 nm.
About 14 seconds' worth of nail growth.
It has four cores, but God is it slow.
That's why I bought a laptop.
I'm using this old PC as an audio book player
Via VNC, an app that allows you to operate a remote PC.
3:47 PM
4:45 PM
Hi
I'm trying to solve an ambiguity by punctuation, but I'm not sure it works this way or no
consider this situation. I was on holiday, but my boss ruined me by sending me tasks to me.
I'm now back in the office. I go and see him and say: "I wanted a break from work, but you gave me more of it"
Now, I want to tell this story to my friend. should I write:
I told them that I wanted a break from work, but they gave me more of it
or
wanted a break from work but they gave me more of it
I think the version without comma is better because the other version can convey the sentence after but is parallel to "I told" not "I wanted"...
Unfortunately, my punctuation book didn't go deep into compound sentences and reported speech, and there are tons of comma rules on the internet.on
5:06 PM
@reith Your pronouns are unclear.
Who is "you", who are "they"?
And why do you switch?
oh sorry. It was bad copy past
[s]wanted a break from work but you gave me more of it[/s] -> I wanted a break from work but they gave me more of it
basically the previous one without the comma
@Mitch literally, because they made the trees into books
@reith OK because you have two independent sentences, a comma is normally written there.
@Cerberus but doesn't the last sentence ("they gave me more of it") emphasis on unexpectancy with regard to "I told them that I wanted a break from work" instead of "I wanted a break from work" with the comma?
actually my suggested sentence was: "I told them that I wanted a break from work but they gave me more of it". I'd missed "I told them that". sorry.
The rule just that you should use a comma before an independent sentence.
I don't think it has to do with emphasis.
5:21 PM
nice. thanks a lot.
With very short sentences, the comma is sometimes omitted.
 
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8:27 PM
ᛠᛚᚪ ᛠᚱᛖᚾᛞᛖᛚ᛫ ᛖᛝᛣᛚᚪ ᛒᛇᚱᚻᛏᚪᛤ᛫
ᚩᚠᛖᚱ ᛗᛁᛞᚪᛝᛣᛠᚱᛞ ᛗᚩᚾᚢᛗ ᛋᛖᚾᛞᛖᛞ
 
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11:01 PM
My New Yorker caption contest entry:

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