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12:07 AM
do you like physics or math more?
I am going to sleep now.
 
@Robusto maybe?
Oh the profile image from 2014
It's part of a Chinese restaurant I made
That was the simplest thing I could think to make out of the parts at hand
@Cerberus problem is I don't get chat notifications quickly enough so I wander off to where the real chat apps are like slack or discord
 
12:31 AM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Haha, good. But why did you use the simplified hanzi for "country"? Couldn't make the traditional version (中國 ) in Lego? You gotta think big, m'boy!
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 No worries, you can come here whenever you like.
> ... sinds begin december circa 77 miljoen doses vanuit de EU geëxporteerd zijn. Pijnlijk is dat dat aantal hoger is dan het totaal gezette vaccinaties in de EU: 66 miljoen. Het Verenigd Koninkrijk ontving het meeste, met 21 miljoen doses. Dat er ondertussen niks in tegengestelde richting kwam voedde frustratie en leidde de afgelopen week tot een plan voor het aanscherpen van de exportrestricties.
Since early December, 77 million doses of vaccines have been exported from the EU, while only 66 doses have been administered in the EU.
21 doses have been exported to Britain.
Nothing from anywhere was exported back to the EU.
I wonder how many doses were exported to America and Israel.
Do you think this warrants export restrictions?
Britain keeps telling how awesome it is, with how large their proportion of vaccinated people is compared with Europe. But now we know why.
We could have had 154 million people vaccinated by now if not for those exports, more than any other bloc.
 
12:54 AM
@Robusto ha. Yeah my talents with Lego are not that good. But also I like simplified characters. And Guo is even missing a stroke. 🤷‍♂️
 
1:28 AM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I noticed. I chalked it up to you not having microblocks.
 
It's pure Lego and those are the smallest plate pieces that exist. To get finer details I'd have to use a different technique
Also it was years ago, I'm at least 2x better now at building. But I never updated my profile
 
 
1 hour later…
2:48 AM
Please explain this statement to me, " The supreme Court has held criticism of government inaction cannot be branded ascan attempt
promote hatred between communities while quashing ahate speech case.
"
Please note it is as an and not ascan(sorry for the typo)
What does this imply?
 
3:09 AM
Another difficult statement is, " Xyz said through the renewed surge in COVID-19 cases in many parts of India was a conference, this time around the growth would continue unabated. "
 
3:35 AM
@CowperKettle In case you are free can you try this...
 
4:23 AM
@RajorshiKoyal Chat etiquette suggests that you should not address specific users with requests for help (unless you are 100% certain that they actually want to be addressed in this case).
 
4:45 AM
 
@Cerberus Ok sorry.
BTW it would be great if anyone is interested to answer the question.
 
5:05 AM
The UK contracted in June/July 2020 for vaccine delivery, as did the US, wheras the EU waited until late fall, not believing vaccines would actually be deveoped so soon and not wanting to spend the money. Now von der Leyen is scolding again, this time Astra Zeneca. The UK must be pleased with Brexit. Export controls result in factories moving to places where they can fulfill their contracts, so probably not a good idea to depend on enemies for essentials (e.g., Russia for gas).
 
5:55 AM
@CowperKettle Since you are my fb friend can we get in touch once on stack exchange?
 
 
1 hour later…
7:17 AM
Is AZ in violation of its contracts with the EU, giving favor to GB?
The Deutsche Welle fact-check article seems to be uncertain and hasn’t seen the a tual contracts.
a tual=actual
 
@CowperKettle What is this graph about?
I could not really get it
 
 
1 hour later…
8:35 AM
@RajorshiKoyal Daily vaccinations in the USA
Spring is in the air!
 
Ok wow..
Really love the pics send some more
If you are free you may reply the topics
Though I am not in extreme urgent need.
 
 
1 hour later…
9:44 AM
hungry
there is no restaurant to dine in here
why is the campus so far from the dorm?
every time I feel going to the campus costs me so much time.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:13 AM
@Bohemianrelativist for the invigorating walk, to wake you up for morning lectures
 
@CowperKettle haha Don't forget the toilet grenade.
 
 
2 hours later…
2:13 PM
> By the summer of 1774, Dwight was down to ninety-five pounds, and his father whisked him home to Northampton, Massachusetts, where he was expected to die. But under doctor's orders to avoid all study and to drink a bottle of Madeira per day, Dwight slowly regained his health over the next few months.
18th century medicine.
 
2:57 PM
I don't understand the phrase at the very end of the clip.
After the last use of the word "Hitler"
 
> Yeah, but before all the...crazy stuff.
So we're at a time where Hitler had not committed any crazy crimes yet.
So it is allowed to give him money.
 
@Cerberus Thank you! I thought he switched to German
I totally could not undersatand anything after "but" and before "crazy sfuff"
 
@CowperKettle Hah.
This character has a (fake) British accent.
Perhaps the change threw you off?
 
Probably
 
 
2 hours later…
4:42 PM
 
5:17 PM
@CowperKettle Could have been tuberculosis.
 
@Xanne Biden should pledge to give away 100 000 000 bottles of Madeira to US citizens in the next 100 days.
@Xanne I copied it from Wikipedia, from the page about Anorexia Nevrosa. But yes, could have been a lot of other things, because symptoms were not meticulously written down back in the 18th century
It's a curious disease, still without any proven specific treatment.
I wonder why it appears to have sprung up in the late 19th century. And now some 0.5% of women are presumed to have it.
Photo from space
 
5:40 PM
@MattE.Эллен it takes public transport together with walking for 1 hour to arrive.
 
5:55 PM
> You often find rubber balloons in decorations, advertising, children's toys, general fun and even in science experiments, but you might not know that the first rubber balloons were made by Michael Faraday in 1824 for use in his experiments with hydrogen
Curious.
 
 
2 hours later…
7:50 PM
@Xanne Madeira relieves symptoms of TB?
@Conrado Is that like a bath bomb?
 
8:07 PM
@Mitch No, it was just the next video in the YT feed... with CowperKettle's guy destroying a watercloset with a "cleaning grenade". Now that you made me explain, I feel quite lame.
 
@Conrado He should make a video about a bath bomb then
and credit me
even if he has already done it.
he stole from me from the past
 
@Mitch That is also capital crime, in the Federation's constitution?
 
maybe put a twist on thngs, a shower bomb
 
@Cerberus?
 
8:10 PM
@Conrado us government enforcement agents like to call it a time crime
the worst kinds are called a prime time crime
a silent actor who plays out such events is called a prime time crime mime
one who is not very good is a lame prime time crime mime
 
And you fine him a dime?
 
if you go around the corner and see him again it's the same lame prime time crime mime
if he's guilty then you can blame the same lame prime time crime mime
@Conrado yes
 
If it's a she, you would blame the same lame dame, a prime time crime mime.
 
damn
 
I forget, can dames be mimes?
 
8:13 PM
I don't think there are any rules about that
you could ask the same about a man mime
and if there were a joke graphic about it, it might become a man mime meme
and if he lost all feeling, it'd be a numb man mime meme
and if he were running from the law (since he committed a time crime)...
 
?? sits on edge of seat
 
it'd be a numb man mime meme on the lam
 
3 mins ago, by Mitch
damn
 
and
if
it were
some kind of animal
it'd be
a numb man mime land mammal meme on the lam
hmmm
 
@Mitch OK, you win.
Writes in factbook: "never engage in rhyming wars with Mitch."
 
8:21 PM
If I could only fit in Rommel somehow.
@Conrado I few years back someone started one with 'macaroon' and I kept going.
 
@M.A.R. that is a very poetic way of saying that Garfield is garbage. Kudos to you.
 
@JohanLarsson That looks very Dutch.
People in Egypt think they have it rough.
 
Even, and more to the point: in despite of, Bill Murray.
@Cerberus to be fair, people think they have it rough everywhere.
Stupid people. Them's the worst.
 
@Mitch soon, moon, spoon, dune, rune, baloon, impugn, tune, Zune, loon, boon, goon; I can see some interesting possibilities.
 
@Xanne That is not what I read, though. I read that the EU signed the contract with A-Z the day before Britain.
 
8:27 PM
Like, I am complelety convinced I have it rough. And I'm posting this BS on the Internet!
Imagine that.
 
(speaking of people who have it rough) She has a claim to complain, if anyone does.
 
@JohanLarsson that is the funniest thing I have seen all week. Also, and unrelatedly, a thing that has happened to me.
 
@Conrado If you can make a story around it...go!
@RegDwigнt You -do- have it rough then.
 
IJsselmeer is the worst. (Ask the @Cerberus if you don't believe me. (Also, never believe the @Cerberus.))
@Mitch thank you, kind cattle.
 
@Xanne Perhaps nobody has a complete picture yet. But it seems 77 vaccine doses have been exported from the EU (of which 21 million to Britain, and how many to Israel and America?), while only 66 million have been administered in the EU. And no vaccines have been allowed to be exported to the EU (all countries mentioned have export blocks, I believe, not only of vaccines but probably also of components). So perhaps you can understand why the EU is finally making a fist like the other blocs.
Usually the EU is all about free trade and soft power.
While America and England like to play a harder game.
 
8:32 PM
Kinky.
Anyone remember this?
 
@Cerberus I thought the explanation of the early slowness of vaccination deployment in Europe was that they had panned early on to make sure that they didn't restrict vaccine export so that the rest of the world could get some too. At least that is my vague memory of -some- explanation.
@RegDwigнt DOn't thank me yet. It's going to get worse.
 
@Cerberus Help!!! My hovercraft is full of eels!!!!!
@Mitch ah, don't be so hard on yourself. There's no worse than you!
 
blushes
 
@Mitch That's probably part of it: the EU really hates export restrictions.
I also suspect the EU has delivered more vaccines to Covax (the project to get vaccines to poor countries), but not sure.
 
@Cerberus Ursula von der Leyen tweeted some shit the other week that almost made me tweet some shit myself for the first time in my life.
In German, of all languages!
 
8:37 PM
Oh?
 
Yeah, she said dear Putin, how come your Russians don't like your fucking vaccine.
And I wanted to reply, Sehr geehrte Frau Doktor Von der Leyen. In meiner Heimatstadt Moskau kann man sich seit Monaten beim Hausarzt impfen lassen. Und seit einigen Wochen in jedem Supermarkt. In meiner Wahlheimatstadt Saarbrücken kann man bis heute beides nicht. Richten Sie bitte Ihren Blick gelegentlich auch nach Deutschland. Danke.
 
Isn't that exactly her question?
 
Well no it isn't. It's the exact opposite in fact.
 
Why does Russia have a low degree of vaccination even though apparently it has vaccines?
But I don't know the context.
 
@Cerberus Precisely because it's available for free while you're shopping for groceries.
The Germans are longing for just that, but they're getting fuck all.
 
8:42 PM
Then I would ask, how come your Russians don't like your fucking vaccine?
Else they'd get vaccinated. But they don't.
 
My church choir, the average age there is 60. The average age is 60. Only two out of the 87 people have got their vaccine.
@Cerberus I've been thinking about flying to Moscow just to get vaccinated. In the next supermarket around the corner. As has been my mom.
My problem is that in the mean while my passport has expired.
My mom doesn't have that problem, so she's probably going, actually.
In Russia itself, nobody much cares because it's just a flu.
In Germany, everyone cares, and everyone gets fuck all.
Verkehrte Welt.
 
Macron
macaron
macaroon
Marconi
macaroni
macarena
Morricone
Americano
Cameroon
Connemara
Mickey Rooney
 
Es ist ein Luxusproblem. Wenn Du ein Klavier zuhause hast, spielst Du es nicht.
 
@RegDwigнt Many more Germans have been vaccinated than Russians, per capita.
 
@Cerberus yeah, in this particular state here, they're actually opening up come April 6th.
It's causing quite a lot of ruckus, right now. All over the evening news.
 
8:48 PM
@RegDwigнt Works with umbrellas too
 
And I'm like, hey, my home state is finally on the evening news, for the first time in two decades.
 
Who is opening what?
Doch an mein Pianola, da lass ich keinen dran.
 
@Cerberus the Saarland. Everything.
 
You mean clubs?
 
@Cerberus come April 6th, you can do anything you want if you got a negative test no older than 24 hours.
And we're, like, right next to France. Where if you so much as leave your home right now, you get fined 1500 Euros.
 
8:51 PM
Ah, with a test.
I hope that goes well.
 
So does everyone, it would seem.
Did you catch the Merkel apologizing to her people the other day? That was fucking unprecedented. Within a minute I got all the respect back that I never had for her, as you'll remember from our past exchanges.
 
I have only just got home.
Am slightly tipsy.
 
I don't even pity her. That's not it. That was a strong move that gets all my respect I can muster.
 
I don't know anything.
 
At the same time, everyone is treating her like she's hot garbage all of a sudden.
 
8:54 PM
But, yeah, Merkel is respectable.
 
@Cerberus I've had 3/4ths of a vodka bottle by now, and I'm finishing the rest as soon as I'm done complaining how much people disrespect Merkel for something that only elevates her in any sane person's eyes.
 
How very Russian of you.
We have some world leaders whose integrity I do not doubt, however much I may hate their politics.
Merkel is one of them.
 
Not very Russian of me to only havve 3/4ths. And not even have a second bottle on hold.
 
Rutte another, oddly.
 
But I have piano and chess lessons tomorrow, so I have to pace myself.
@Cerberus yeah I saw him cycling the other week. We discussed.
 
8:58 PM
What did we discuss?
And what about cycling?
 
You posted pictures of the room you were in. With candles made out of electricity. And I talked about Rutte being made out of teflon.
Anyway, I have the rest of a bottle to go pay a visit to. And then maybe sleep.
Mar 19 at 5:15, by RegDwigнt
Yeah I saw Rutte riding his bike all over the news.
 
@RegDwigнt Ah, OK. Well, he certainly is made of teflon. But I'm not sure I'd call that integrity!
 
Well that's a given.
If you're made out of integrity, you don't go into politics.
Oct 26 '20 at 23:01, by RegDwigнt
The Ancient Greeks had it all figured out. You don't want to go into politics because you're a blacksmith or a housewife? Well, that's exactly why you belong in politics.
Oct 26 '20 at 23:02, by RegDwigнt
You want to run for president? That's the dead giveaway right there that anyone would make a better president than you.
 
It's also the Roman ideal.
 
9:03 PM
> In 458 Cincinnatus was appointed dictator of Rome in order to rescue a consular army that was surrounded by the Aequi on Mount Algidus. At the time of his appointment he was working a small farm. He is said to have defeated the enemy in a single day and celebrated a triumph in Rome. Soon after, he resigned and returned to his farm.
 
Wait, that's missing the actual punchline.
 
He didn't want the power.
 
This was fucking unprecedented.
I saw this woman no ten years ago not half a mile away from where I'm sitting right now. I would like to shake her hand with more sincerity than I did back then.
Wohlsein.
 
@RegDwigнt Can you summarise in one sentence what she is apologising for, except the meandering course of government in its Corona regulations (that's what I gleaned from the first video)?
What's up with this Osterruhe?
 
Does anyone understand what the value of variable "shadowing" in Rust might be? I'm damned if I see the value.
 
9:24 PM
@Cerberus Now that's how you do 'temporarily coming out of retirement'
 
@Mitch Exactement!
 
@Cerberus But really it was just that one guy. Was everybody at that time so 'principled' and 'anti-corrupt'?
 
@Mitch It is a bit of a legend, so the story was probably embellished a bit.
 
When did 'schooling' start in Rome?
like rich people sending their rich kids to learn history and write because that's what rich people do.
 
Child's age, or historical period?
 
9:33 PM
historical period
 
I don't know, there was probably some schooling even in praehistoric times?
 
tutoring
@Cerberus that's what I'm trying to imagine
like were the germanic tribes (who sound like hunter gatherers to me when the Romans started trying to invade) were the germans tutoring their kids?
How about the Incas?
Aztec kids had to to learn -some- biology before getting a good heart-removal job.
for Greek writing (which implies some (probably very small) educated and literate subgroup), ~1100 it was linear A and B but modern Greek style by 700-600?
Once again I could look this up.
But frankly, sometimes texts just don't answer with what you want to know but only about what is already known, which is not necessarily the product of curiosity but just because you found that one dusty book in the attic that exists, and the book that didn't exist, well, nobody knows anything about that stuff.
 
@Mitch Noo not hunter-gatherers.
 
I just heard the other day that Panini, the great Indian grammarian and sandwich maker, who is considered the first great linguist of all time, ~500BC, had a grammar of Sanskrit but in a very scholarly manner, referenced a number of other people who were working on laying out the grammar of Sanskrit, and he, Panini, was only working on one part of it, and that that part was not as important as the other authors, so basically what comes down to us is second rate and incomplete.
I'm embellishing it a bit.
Like the sandwich part.
@Cerberus Villagers?
It seems like they were moving around a lot.
like migrating constantly.
 
They had towns and villages.
Not constantly.
They just didn't have writing.
 
9:46 PM
hm...maybe it was just that the Romans who were recording their locations just were guessing, and guessed differently every time they wrote it down?
@Cerberus they also weren't sedentary, right?
like every generation they'd move around?
 
There were 1001 tribes.
 
that seems like a lot
 
Even in the Stone Age, settlements existed everywhere that flourished for centuries or longer.
 
how about every 3 or 4 generations?
 
Each tribe was different.
 
9:48 PM
@Cerberus No one ever says this stuff outright in the books
 
I'm sure many tribes had old settlements as well.
Though of course not the ones just arrived in central Europe.
But their family around the Baltic probably had fixed settlements.
 
@Cerberus it's hard to keep track
 
Yes.
We know little about them because they had no writing.
 
@Cerberus I'm also having trouble thinking that that was a good place to settle. You know, winters and all.
@Cerberus seems a bit unfair
like maybe they were all like Cincinnatus, but Cincinnatus was one of a kind among the corrupt Romans
 
Quite possibly!
But I think you already posted that nice video.
 
9:51 PM
That video was more about 0AD and onwards
 
Those Germans had been living in some areas bordering on the Roman Empire for centuries, when the Romans came.
 
which, forgetting the movements of the Visi- and Ostrogoths were pretty stable
 
And I'm sure they were agricultural, not hunter-gatherers.
At least many tribes.
They had what you might call town just outside the Roman Empire, by the first century AD, I think.
But they were already under heavy Roman influence by then.
 
@Cerberus there's the slow encroachment of the West Germans towards the east (Prussia and Silesia (which was preceded by Slavs filling in most of eastern and mideurope) from 500-1500AD(?) )
 
I'm not entirely sure about the order.
 
9:56 PM
@Cerberus Many of the Modern New England cities in the US (founded in the early 1600s) were actually centered on abandoned North American Indian villages.
 
But, yeah, there were Slavs and Germans in that region.
 
@Cerberus Yes, I'm mixing up many different eras
 
@Mitch Smart.
 
@Cerberus well..
 
The crusades by the Teutonic Knights were mostly against (heathen) Slavs, I think.
In Prussia.
 
9:58 PM
abandoned mostly because of things like measles wiping out those villages, which had been brought over by European fishermen in the 1500's
 
@Mitch Yeah, an unfortunate affair.
Great migrations seldom bring peace.
 
But anyway, American history books leave or rather left me with the impression that native Americans were all hunter gatherers, and I kind of assumed the Germans were the same.
 
By the way, I think Ruthanian/Rus/Ros is all the same word as Russian?
@Mitch I think the ones in North America were?
 
But maybe they were alike in that they were both agricultural cultures just not as successful as the empires taking over.
 
Or maybe they also kept herds?
Maybe there was also agriculture in North America (I mean benorth, say, New Mexico, where I'm sure there was)?
@Mitch No, I think various Germanic tribes were far more evenly matched against the Romans.
 
10:02 PM
@Cerberus I think some were but some also weren't. It's a big country. The one's out in the great Plains in the midwest were (and those further north like the Athabaskans and the Inuit) but many (like the Hopi and Navaho and the East coast tribes) were villagers (I think)
@Cerberus Oh? In what way? I'm pretty sure the Germans didn't have their own aqueducts and arches and stuff before the Romans
 
> Caesar writes that the Germanic tribes were not agricultural people, and that tribal leaders instituted active measures to prevent members of the tribe from becoming settled agriculturalists.
Archaeological research has however discovered that this observation by Caesar is not entirely correct. Agriculture was and had been for a long time a key component in Germanic life. Caesar's observations were made from warlike tribes on the move near the Roman borders, and are thus not representative of all the Germanic peoples. That agriculture was an important part of Germanic life is attested by
Agriculture is a stone-age thing.
So I think you can assume that most peoples in Eurasia practised agriculture by that time.
 
@Cerberus Que es la Espada?
 
@Mitch That would make sense.
 
@Cerberus huh. I never considered Ruthenia to be cognate but now that you mention it, it could hardly not be.
 
@Mitch Not those things, but I'm sure they had their own stone buildings.
@Mitch "What is the spade/sword?"?
@Mitch I believe it is.
What I meant is that the confrontation between Romans and Germans was nothing like that between Indians and Europeans.
Yes, the Romans were far more advanced and more urban to be sure.
 
10:08 PM
@Cerberus so it takes reading skills, of which I am sorely missing, to get the mixed message there. The general impression (which I supposedly get implicitly everywhere) is that the Germans were not agricultural (as the first sentence says). But I must have never read on to get the nuance, that really it was just JC's superficial understanding also.
 
But the gap was much, much smaller.
 
@Cerberus It was a label in the map, for what I think were Baltic (Estonian) types.
 
@Mitch Yeah, I'm trying to find an explanation of why one might think the Germans did not practise agriculture. You'd be in good company to think that.
 
@Cerberus OK. Yeah the Indians did not have guns. And they definitely didn't have stone architecture.
 
@Mitch On this map?
@Mitch And the Europeans were far more advanced than the Romans.
 
10:11 PM
@Cerberus Si. 'Caballeros de la Espada'
Knights of the Sword?
the black arrows are for the Teutonic Knights.
 
Ah, I see it.
I really don't know.
The Livonian Brothers of the Sword (Latin: Fratres militiæ Christi Livoniae, German: Schwertbrüderorden, French: Ordre des Chevaliers Porte-Glaive) was a Catholic military order established by Albert, the third bishop of Riga (or possibly by Theoderich von Treyden), in 1202. Pope Innocent III sanctioned the establishment in 1204 for the second time. The membership of the order comprised German "warrior monks" who fought Baltic and Finnic pagans in the area of modern-day Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Alternative names of the Order include Christ Knights, Swordbrothers, Sword Brethren, Order of...
I had not heard of them!
> Following their defeat by the Samogitians and Semigallians in the Battle of Schaulen (Saule) in 1236, the surviving Brothers merged into the Teutonic Order as an autonomous branch and became known as the Livonian Order.
> The indigenous inhabitants of Livonia were various Finnic tribes in the north and Baltic tribes in the south. The descendants of the crusaders formed the nucleus of the new ruling class of Livonia after the Livonian Crusade, and eventually became known as Baltic Germans.
So the Teutonic Knights also fought Finnish people.
@Mitch > Archaeological research has uncovered two forms of Germanic agricultural settlements. There were the farm village and the individual farm. The prevalence of either of these forms of settlements depended upon the nature of the land.[49]

The prevalence of the individual farm among Germanic peoples has sometimes been ascribed to their love of independence. Such individual farms depended upon a plentiful supply of water. Areas with poor soil or were the area was broken up by hills also encouraged the prevalence of individual farms. In the Icelandic sagas only individual farms are ment
 

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