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7:06 AM
I read a lot about Hatchbox filaments, have you seen how they advertise their product?
Look at the bad print quality.... I would never have such a picture advertising my product. This may have nothing to do with the filament quality itself, but I think it is unwise to show it like they do.
@Greenonline and @all (woulf be great it that actually existed :) ) should we encourage the poster of question 3dprinting.stackexchange.com/questions/7016/… to change the title into "monoprice select mini v2 stringing problem"? As it is now it is not really a question and it is directed to a solution, not the problem. Please share your thoughts.
 
 
1 hour later…
8:17 AM
@0scar looks more like a printer problem, but tells me they have not dialed in their temps
 
@Trish Yes I know, that is why I don't understand why they use such a picture of such a bad quality printed part. If you would not know better, or are very inexperienced (luckily we do know and are experienced) you might not want to buy the filament based on this image!
 
@0scar actually, it puts me off even as I know it is likely printer related: they don't know their print settings it seems.
the temperature.
and they can't model for S*****
 
8:36 AM
@Trish :) +1
@Trish What do you think about changing the questions title as mentioned in chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/46935344#46935344
 
hmmm, wors
*works
 
 
3 hours later…
11:30 AM
@0scar Yeah, good call, I've just edited and changed it
 
@Greenonline OK thanks, I'm usually careful in changing the title, hence the question
 
11:42 AM
@0scar Changing the title is ok, if it makes it clearer, fixes typos, removes unnecessary gumpf, etc
Often you'll see just "XXXX Problem" without describing what the problem really is - as in this case (sort of).
 
 
3 hours later…
2:57 PM
@0scar @Greenonline - We get that a lot over on Mech ... the "non-descript" title. I change those all the time, as I'd like them to be more easily seen/understood, so to give the person a better chance of it getting answered. On the flip side, there are some questions which have a unique title which were made that way on purpose. Case in point:
79
Q: Why don't we rotate tyres but you rotate tires?

Steve MatthewsIs planning a regular rotation of new tyres over their lifespan a good or bad plan? From many posts I've seen here and elsewhere on the web, motorists in the USA seem to see rotating tires as a task which ought to be undertaken at regular intervals. By rotating tires, I mean moving their positi...

It has an attention grabbing title. It says exactly what it means. It made the question very popular. It was very high on the HNQ list for a couple of days, in fact. There have been two attempts (I'm aware of) to change the question title. I turned down a request from review and rolled another back which had been accepted. There was a specific reason it was asked how it was. I want it to stay that way.
 
 
3 hours later…
6:09 PM
@Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 - That's a very interesting question (tyre rotation), and I like your answer. I remeber as a kid reading an old AA handbook (a big hardback version from the mid 60's and it stated in there that tyres should be rotated). I always used to rotate my tyres, until I ended up with sportier cars with different sized tyres front and back. But on old Merc's (W123) 200D and BMW 320/323 (E30) (I think) the tyres were all the same so it was easy to rotate them.
 
6:44 PM
@Greenonline - Yup, sounds about right.
 
7:34 PM
I may have an answer for this question: 3dprinting.stackexchange.com/q/3587/11242 ... but I'm not sure I understand the implications of the testing which was done yet, so I'll continue to read it and might post an answer to it later.
 
8:07 PM
good morning
 
8:44 PM
@Christoph - Hola!
 
I'm trying to come up with a good design for a hot wire foam cutter
the principle will be the same as for this one: thingiverse.com/thing:2198575
but I really don't like the design of the inear guides. I'm looking into more off the sehlf components, and that's where it gets chatty
so, does any of you have experience in chosing the right type of parts for linear motion?
 
9:09 PM
@Christoph - Are you talking about (in the thingiverse example) the bearings riding on the extruded aluminum?
 
yes, that
 
What do you not like about it?
 
maybe I also just don't understand it in its entirety - but as I see it, there's a lot that can go wrong. Like the alu extrusion being too narrow (not all bearings touch), or they move sideways due to misalignment
 
You should be able to make adjustments to tighten things up?
Mind you, I haven't looked at it too close, but it should be the width of the rollers and the straightness of the aluminum extrusions, it should roll straight/true (I'd think)
 
give it a bump and it will be off
 
9:15 PM
Not necessarily ... and the only time it'd be off is if it was bumped while it's doing it's thing.
I don't know, really. Maybe @0scar @Trish or @Greenonline have used something like.
@Christoph - Now that I'm looking at it, it seems strange the two separate pieces aren't supported in relationship to each other in any way I can tell.
 
you mean the two axes pairs (or the two main assemblies, for a different wording)
they should be mounted to a common base, but that's not a problem. In the actual application it doesn't matter if the distance is off by a few mm or if it chances with x
*changes
 
9:42 PM
otoh I could just build one since the electronics and motors will be the most expensive parts anyway. If it doesn't do the job I could still redo it with more sophisticated hardware
 
10:07 PM
@Christoph @Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 That brings back some great memories! Foam cutting wings for model aircraft. If I inhale deeply I can still smell the epoxy that covered the balsa wood on the foam. ;) A colleague of mine (very good application engineer) has build his own foam cutter, complete with Excel file NACA profile generator. And firmware, I'll ask him next week.
 
10:25 PM
@Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 what you refer to?
@Christoph I only know manual foam cutters, which is pretty much jsut a hot wire in a C-shaped bracket.
With a frame and two heads moving in unison on two XZ planes interconnected with the wire being the Y, you could have a hot-wire router using vertical axis.
 

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