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1:58 AM
@Cerberus I just started reading Game of Thrones. You should pick up the books!
What's your favorite fantasy or sci-fi, by the way?
 
 
1 hour later…
3:20 AM
@ktm5124 I'll keep it in mind!
You don't mind already knowing the story?
Hard to say, but I am a bit fan of Jack Vance and Tolkien.
You?
 
 
11 hours later…
2:16 PM
@luchonacho Yeah, the LaTeX discussion is getting off-topic in the family tree question. :)
TikZ has a lot of room to do anything, but I wouldn't want to code every line and box by hand. If there's a package that does it neatly, it's a good option.
It might also be better to put the tree sideways.
I deleted some comments under my answer to keep it cleaner.
 
2:46 PM
Arbot: Reading an answer to this Greek question, it occurred to me that I, like any other male user, am a membrum virile. I don't see a way to fully resolve the ambiguity...
 
 
3 hours later…
5:31 PM
Salvētē!
 
5:50 PM
@EthanBierlein Salve! Quo modo vales?
 
6:15 PM
@JoonasIlmavirta Bonus sum, et tū?
 
6:35 PM
@EthanBierlein Bene valeo. Primus dies feriarum aestivarum est. :)
 
Ah, egō ē fēriā abhinc duās diēs rediī.
In castrīs (nōn mīlitāris scīlicet) manēbam.
 
@EthanBierlein In qualibus castris?
 
6:54 PM
castra nōrmālia...?
flammās fēcī, in aliquibus lacubus natāvī, etc.
 
Ah! In tuo tentoriolo?
Primum credidi te in aliquo loco munito fuisse.
 
Sīc, numquam in RV dormiam.
 
@EthanBierlein RV?
 
Cepi.
Quonam modo Latine appelletur?
@Narusan Salve!
Domus mobilis? Tentorium vehiculare?
 
7:07 PM
Illa sunt bona.
Latīnē bene nōn loquor, sīc saepe verbīs anglicīs prō latīnīs ūtor.
 
Ita linguae novae discuntur!
Uti conaris et sic melior meliorque fis. Discipuli nimis timent, ne errent, et nimis tacent.
Ne ego quidem immaculate Latine loquor, sed conari placet.
 
Grātiās tibi prō amīcīs verbīs agō. Egō linguam Latīnam persevērō discere et fiō melior quam ille quī nunc sum.
:)
 
7:25 PM
Certe! Scribendo legere quoque disces.
Vidi multis studiosis difficile esse legere cito, cum verba frequenter occurrentia non meminissent.
Studesne linguam Latinam solam?
 
7:44 PM
Quoniam in ludō sum, cum aliīs discipulīs per mēnsēs Septembrēs Iūniīque discō. In aestā tamen, linguam Latīnam sōlum discō (quid nunc faciō).
Dē linguīs quibus studeō, linguae Latīnae sōlae nunc.
 
Quale est genus ludi tui? Lyceum?
 
high school (Latīnē nesciō loquī)
 
Systema Americanum mihi haud penitus notum est.
Vin rogare in situ nostro, quomodo "high school" Latine reddatur?
Forsitan equidem id lyceum appellarim.
Nescio, quo nomine vocari soleat.
 
8:03 PM
Nesciō quoque quō nōmine "high school" Latīnē vocārī soleat, īnfortūnātē.
 
Rogare potes! Ea ipsa causa hunc situm habemus.
Et plura rogata habere debemus. Parum influunt nova.
 
Tum eam rogābō. Ea mox mittētur.
 
Optime!
 
Haec legere multis horis me diuturnum fuerit, etiam ea scribere erat
Is it at least understandable?
 
8:19 PM
I can get most of it I think, but I'm not sure I parse everything as you intended.
 
To write all this has taken multiple hours for me, and to have written this as well
The translation is a bit clumsy because it basically went German -> Latin -> English
 
I see. Taking several steps often gets the message a little blurry...
 
yeah
how could that have been formulated a bit less clumsy
 
In fact, you could ask about that on the site itself.
Help in formulating something like that in Latin is what the site is good for, and we are in need of questions.
 
"Omnēs huius verbōrum et haec verba quoque scrībere multās hōrās ā mē cēpit."
haec fortasse? ^^
 
8:24 PM
@EthanBierlein Hmm... Why the genitives?
 
@EthanBierlein Why genitive? And wouldn't huius and eae be nicer? As in there and here
@JoonasIlmavirta Ok, I'll do (and boast about my extensive thoughts and approaches, who were all probably wrong)
 
omnēs huius verbōrum" -> "all of these words / all of this"
 
Frankly, I don't know how to say "it took me two hours to do this" in Latin. I think I'll want to figure that out...
 
I suppose that "omnēs haec verba" would work fine as well.
 
Trouble is I only had 7 years of Latin in school, and only Latin->German, not the other way round, so there are many things I do naturally in German and English without thinking about it (adverbs adverbs adverbs) that messes up my Latin
 
8:26 PM
I suspect that it's probably a matter of personal preference (and if not, just figure what the Romans would have done).
 
@Narusan It's important to not only learn what's right, but also why some earlier ideas were wrong. I know it can be a little humiliating at times, but getting feedback aimed at your thoughts is useful.
@Narusan Aww, there are way too many people who have studied Latin one-sidedly. Even that one direction would be stronger if people were trained both ways.
3
@EthanBierlein That'd be omnia horum verborum. The omnia should agree with the implicit verba, and horum with verborum.
 
I agree - but: Half of my Latin mark was made up by literary interpretation of the translation of Latin works. And half of my time was wasted on that which I essentially did in my other foreign languages as well.
 
@JoonasIlmavirta Ēheu! Grātiās!
 
I was happy about every bit of Latin language I could get myself without German translation, let alone the other way round
@JoonasIlmavirta I will get the price for the least descriptive post title ever. But otherwise, it won't fit
 
@Narusan I have written some 500 contenders for that prize...
 
8:31 PM
@JoonasIlmavirta rogāta est!
 
It's good that people can edit each other's writings here. It's much easier to find good phrasings when you can use several brains.
@EthanBierlein Suffragavi! Sitne titulus aptus?
 
Grātiās et sīc!
Egō eam mūtābō.
 
@Narusan I didn't mean you couldn't enjoy studying Latin in a specific way. I just think it would be way more efficient to use the language in many ways, even if there was just the single goal of translating from Latin to German.
 
@JoonasIlmavirta yes it would
and it would be more enjoyable
But I've complained about not seeing enough Latin -> German, so I wouldn't even bother about German -> Latin at that stage
 
In high school (if that's a good translation of lukio) we used Latin in many ways, but it became narrower in university. I kept the breath up myself, trying to use the language for things beside my courses.
@Narusan One thing I quite like is trying to work entirely within Latin. Trying to express myself (to myself) in a language helps quite a bit, but it's admittedly slow in the beginning.
 
8:37 PM
That's what I'm trying to do right now, learn via induction, in a sense.
Obviously learning grammar and vocabulary is still crucial, but it's still good to have a more natural "feel" for how to speak and write.
If that makes sense.
 
Oh yes, it does.
 
@JoonasIlmavirta My vocab is sooo small, even Latin->German
It was enough to excel in school, but that is not comparable
So it's difficult to find a starting point, and I do it more as a hobby
 
You can remember the grammar and dictionary by heart, but it doesn't mean you'd be able to intuitively say your name and ask for mine.
 
Indeed.
That's why I've never understood why Latin is almost exclusively taught via the grammar-translation method.
 
And trying to do basic things in Latin (like writing an email) really drills the basics to your head.
 
8:40 PM
@JoonasIlmavirta Started to think about how to say that (don't give it away, let me think)
 
I mean, you're learning a language. It's obviously good to have translation ability, but wouldn't you also want to speak, write, and interpret it too?
 
I've seen students in relatively advanced courses trying to memorize how to conjugate esse just before the exam starts... :(
@Narusan I won't. That's a good exercise. :)
 
That's unfortunate.
In an ideal world, one would learn to conjugate verbs by first memorizing them and also using them in a natural setting.
 
You should be able to say "you were" without mentally listing eram, eras, erat, eramus, eratis.
 
Me Narusan appellatur. Nomini es? (dativus possesivus maybe?)
 
8:41 PM
Of course you have to memorize too, and you sometimes need to fall back on that when intuition fails.
 
@JoonasIlmavirta just doing this in my head as I read it...
ablativus temporalis is a thing, right?
 
@Narusan Yes, you can express time with ablatives. Like hac nocte = "tonight".
 
@Narusan There are many ways to go about that. Using appellare, you could say Me Narusan appellant (they call me Narusan; active) or Narusan appellor (I am called Narusan; passive).
 
8:43 PM
@Narusan Suffrāgāvī!
 
Or simply nomen meum est Narusan or even Narusan sum.
 
@JoonasIlmavirta Oh, yeah, first person
 
@EthanBierlein Ego quoque.
 
Would something like "Gaius nōmine sum" work as well?
 
Gaius nomini sum, not? Dativus possesivus
Me nomini Gaius est maybe
 
8:45 PM
@Narusan That sometimes gets me too. In Finnish we have a passive, but it's different. More than a true passive, its impersonal.
With possessive dative: Mihi nomen est X, "I have the name X".
 
@EthanBierlein Yeah. Ablative of respect is perfectly valid.
 
Ah, wrong way round again.
@EthanBierlein Aren't there modern Latin dictionaries around? [I had to return mine after school was done, otherwise I'd look it up straightaway]
 
There are a ton. I did take a look through my PDF of the OLD and my paper dictionary before posting, but I could not find anything matching the phrase "high school".
 
@Narusan And once you know the options for introducing yourself and understand how they work, it's a good exercise to convert them all to questions.
 
8:50 PM
@JoonasIlmavirta guess what I'm trying to do right now
 
Nomen meum est X. > Quid est nomen tuum?
@Narusan :)
I should go to bed.
Curate, ut quam optime valeatis!
 
Valē!
 
Salve. Mihi est Narusan nomen. Ego non sum iuvenem, at nondum adultum.
I feel like a clumsy four-year old
Lingua latina septimis annis studebam. (Imperativ for progressive stuff, wasn't it?)
 
9:28 PM
@JoonasIlmavirta so much to that :P
 
9:48 PM
@Narusan illa verba erint "linguae Latīnae" et "septem" nōn "lingua Latīna" et "septimis"
Septem is an indeclinable cardinal number.
Septimus is a declinable ordinal number.
cardinal =/= ordinal
 

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