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4:28 AM
@ScottS. I think it went off the rails with the last sentance "Mathias replaced Judas, making again the total of 12 apostles. But then there came Paul, a self-proclaimed apostle. Was he a real apostle?"
There really wasn't a need to include Rev 21 and it has no relationship to the actual question.
Which just makes the question about a bible topic without an actual passage.
Meanwhile, if the question asked "Is Paul one of the 12 apostles of the Lamb mentioned in Rev 21" then this might be on-topic. In fact, I think I shall edit it to ask this.
 
 
9 hours later…
1:31 PM
@Dɑvïd It seems you and I have a different tagging philosophy for questions. So either I need to understand something and change my view, or you do, or we both do in some way. I tagged and because determining what an author knew of someone else in his time would require historical information on the persons and/or contextual information from the writing.
Regarding history, the tag info includes this: "events narrated within the Bible or of Bible times generally, or about the history of the biblical text itself." So the history of whether the author knew of Paul seems to apply.
Of context, part of tag description states: "on the nature of the context of the specified text, and the constraints it places on the understanding of that text," which to me, whether the author knew of Paul or not would be part of the "nature" of Revelation's context.
And I tagged because it was seeking information about the author himself, which to me matches the description of the tag: "Questions about the authorship of particular parts of the bible" (which I read as either who wrote that part or information about the author himself that might have affected that text).
So that was why I added the tags. I'm open to hear why you removed them, and anyone else's thoughts about tagging philosophy (which this meta post did nothing to help me with :-) ).
 

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