« first day (2009 days earlier)      last day (999 days later) » 

9:04 AM
1
Q: What languages are perceived as classy or fancy to French speakers?

CatomicIn English, this might be demonstrated by using the word boutique rather than shop, or by saying au contraire rather than on the contrary, because to English speakers French is commonly perceived as high-class or fancy (at least in American/British English) and sometimes that's the feel the speak...

Not a foreign language as such, Latin still plays an important part in French society.
Learning Latin is still considered as a "class" thing so using a Latin word where a simple word or expression could be used is a sure sign of a certain type of discourse (academic) or in everyday speech wanting to sound a little above the crowd
Some examples needed.
Then I would say it depends what one is talking about. In some fields some words are predominant in one language because that language has had a lot of natives contributing to that field. As German for philosophy @SimonDéchamps was saying or Italian for music (classical music).
"What do the French do when they need a French word?"
If you mean a word that does not exist in French yet, as is often the case in computer science, they will most of the time use the foreign word, i.e. English as far as computer science is concerned.
But this is highly discouraged by The French Ministère de la Culture that regularly publish in the Journal Officiel French words and phrases to be used instead of their foreign (most of them English) counterparts.
All these words and phrases can be found on FranceTerme.
There's quite a great number of people in France lobbying for the ban of foreign words (mostly English...) in every field, they're those who regret the times when French was the Lingua Franca of the world.
Linga Franca take that as an example of professional jargon in Latin that could have been avoided had I wanted to use a French expression to be understood by the masses. (cf a few lines higher up).
 

« first day (2009 days earlier)      last day (999 days later) »