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12:04 AM
@Mitch There's no need to do that: Sherlock Holmes has already solved it!
 
12:20 AM
@Cerberus Freudian slip
@Tonepoet I read all those years ago. I've forgotten them almost entirely. The Sign of Four was about... something. There was a woman maybe and this guy from the Nicobar islands?
 
Don't worry, it's the same way with me. XP
I only remember a few of the stories, vaguely.
 
@ktm5124 be open. if a conflict, ask.
@ktm5124 shows you're making progress!
@Tonepoet makes reading them again still enjoyable.
 
You took the keystrokes off of my fingertips.
 
hahah
that sounds like it hurts
 
It only hurts if you dig in underneath the fingernails to do it.
 
12:27 AM
also, that vaguely sounds familiar, like I've said or heard it before.
 
^Seems. =P
 
Mar 9 at 16:04, by Mitch
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I can't actually remember movie plots much anymore. I just remember my vague impressions. So it allows me to watch again without any spoilers other than vague apprehension.
which now that I think of it, wasn't the first time anybody has said that here.
have you seen the movie 'Memento'?
Have I asked you that before?
in The Frying Pan, Jan 12 '14 at 16:12, by Jolenealaska
Hmm...have I asked you that before?
 
12:54 AM
@Cerberus where do you find these?
 
@tchrist Yup over.
@Mitch Or...maybe quite explicit!
@Mitch Oh, around the Internet.
I don't remember.
It was in Google Images.
 
You're lying. You're part of the redhead promotion league. Wait... you're red headed yourself.
looking closer I have more complaints about the making of that map.
notice how it sometimes follows exactly country boundaries, and sometimes just continuous curves not even political county boundaries?
 
1:11 AM
I have snake hair.
I have noticed.
They've probably used statistics from mixed sources.
 
@Cerberus copperhead snakes
 
Possibly!
 
@Cerberus I demand consistency!
But you get your data where you can
anyway, consistency is kind of important for data
 
1:26 AM
Lorin just brought me a hummingbird, which makes me sad no matter how proud he is of his acrobatic skills.
 
1:39 AM
I never know who to root for. It's always a success for one of them, and a failure for the other.
 
2:15 AM
@Mitch Go stand picket at the gates!
Stand picket, that doesn't sound right. Oh, well.
 
2:31 AM
Good night, guys!
 
Sleep well!
 
 
1 hour later…
3:54 AM
@tchrist You may want to consider buying a collar with a bell if you're letting your cat go outside. It'll scare away the birds and more importantly, know people that it's not feral.
@Cerberus So I know you like Modern English usage, but what do you think about The King's English?
 
4:16 AM
@Tonepoet He has a collar with bells. It does no good. He is a very very good hunter. Everybody knows him and no one would ever think he's feral. He is too friendly.
But thanks.
 
Not even just a bell but a plurality of them? Oh dear...
 
@Tonepoet I quote from it sometimes.
Some of its idiom is now decidedly obsolete, but its principles are sound!
 
4:41 AM
Thanks for the answer.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:40 AM
[ SmokeDetector ] Bad keyword in body, blacklisted website in body, blacklisted user: We are talked about Schürrle by ylfifacoins on english.stackexchange.com
 
7:02 AM
@Cerberus I posted a list of Europe maps with this one a few weeks ago
 
 
5 hours later…
12:11 PM
Sorry for bothering. Is "the" needed before "number" in the following sentence?
The correct answer is (the) number 2.
Please poke me if you make a response to this question so I can get notified.
 
@SingleFighter No, it wouldn't be correct to use "the" there.
 
@sumelic Thanks.
 
@ktm5124 You sound like you have good, open communication with both bosses. So if it's simply a matter of preferences (nothing illegal, shady, etc) in the usual course of business, why not explain briefly what the other boss said, then defer to the one highest on the pecking order? It seems unwise to try to arbitrate between your bosses.
@SingleFighter Hm, I have a slightly different view to @sumelic. If you mean that the answer is literally "2", not "item 2" / "the second choice on the list", then the is necessary.
 
Which is very unlikely.
 
@Lawrence I see. Thanks. Understood.
 
12:23 PM
(And by slightly, I didn't mean completely opposite :) . I meant that there was an exception to the general case.)
 
@Lawrence Oh, good point. I didn't even think of it that way.
 
1:19 PM
@SingleFighter both options are correct
Oh bother. You've all aid all that already.
@Cerberus I usually just man the barricades. or pen a strongly worded email.
I bought your 'stand picket' but on reflection maybe that's word. If we say it enough everyone else will just accept it.
I won't stand picket on that though. Not worth the trouble.
 
'Stand picket' or just 'picket' or 'walk a picket line' are all usual phrases.
 
1:37 PM
Hello
 
I cant remember the exact wording
There is a quote which goes something like this "It is better to be the king of servants than the servant of kings"
Does it ring a bell? I need the exact wording.
 
@SouradeepNanda you can edit your messages within a short time window (2 minutes? maybe) if there's a typo
2
 
@SouradeepNanda Better to reign in hell than serve in heaven?
 
Oh yes! Thanks.
 
1:45 PM
It's Milton, Paradise Lost, if you were wondering that too.
 
I heard this quote in my childhood.
I was thinking whether I should join a higher post in a smaller company or a small post in a large company.
 
There is more room to move up in a large company
 
You are right. Life would be pretty boring if you started from the top of Mount Everest.
 
Well, that depends.
It's just that a lower ranked position at a larger company might be a better long-term play. But in the short term, maybe not. So it matters what your 5 year plan is.
 
I am not very sure, even after 5 years you would just end up being another cog in a large machine. A larger and more important cog, but you will not be steering the ship.
 
1:54 PM
Well, is your goal to steer ships? Or to make money so that your family can get educated, have food, shelter, and iphones?
Some people gotta steer.
Others don't.
 
I am 20 and not very family oriented. Steering ships sounds like a great adventure. It sounds meaningful and grand.
 
20 is not very experienced for steering.
It's also young enough to have lots of options down the road.
 
...but isnt it a great age for adventuring?
 
Learning how the big ship works so that you can transfer that to your own smaller ship, for example.
@SouradeepNanda Yes.
But I don't consider a career to be an adventure.
Most people won't ever have an adventurous career and that's fine.
 
I have nothing to lose as I have gained nothing yet. Isnt this the perfect time for risks?
 
1:59 PM
Yes.
But also the perfect time for saving for retirement.
Due to the magic of compound interest, money you save now will pay off much bigger than money you save in a decade.
But it's also the best time to go to university
which is what I was doing when I was 20
You probably think I'm a boring old man. :p
 
My country had a 1000% inflation over the past 50 years. So all the money my dad saved in his young years are effectively nothing. So he advises against aggressive saving right now. Rather, he says, I should invest in housing assets.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 !!
 
I am undergrad, 2 more years to get a degree in Computer Science and Engineering.
 
@SouradeepNanda Hm, that is an issue. But investing in housing is a kind of saving.
 
Most people I know find working in a small organisation much more enjoyable than in a large one.
 
2:02 PM
@Cerberus Sorry, iPhones
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Silence!!
 
@Cerberus That really depends on the organization
 
I'm sure it does.
There are bad small organisations.
 
like, being some random developer at Google? probably boring. Being some random developer working on Android at Google? maybe not so boring.
 
But large ones very, very often tend more towards bureaucracy, rules.
 
2:03 PM
Most small organisations are bad. I checked the numbers.
 
@SouradeepNanda Again, it depends on what you want to do.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I don't know that that's not boring.
@SouradeepNanda What numbers?
 
@Cerberus Surely no more boring than being a developer on any other project.
Most software developers like their jobs.
 
I am really considering the idea of working in a big company for maybe a decade or so. Investing in stock market and then using all that money for my own startup.
 
Maybe there are a lot more forms and meetings and workshops at the larger company.
And more distance between you and the person who decides on things.
@SouradeepNanda Stock markets are dangerous, especially in countries with 1000% inflation.
A safe investment is buying bonds from a stable (rated AAA) government.
But the interest is zero.
Just make sure that, wherever you invest, it's in a stable currency.
 
2:07 PM
Its about 1000% over 50 years :)
The inflation rate currently is 5-6% for last 5 years
 
Ohh.
Investing in housing is also unpredictable.
People lost a lot of money that way, during the crisis, even in rich countries.
 
@SouradeepNanda When you are starting out, most jobs will be equivalent. Look for something that offers good pay or good learning opportunities. Move around (within the company or to a new company) after a few years, at least once or twice, to get a taste of some other places.
Unless you have a specific goal, like, I want my own company to build whatever for blah blah blah.
 
Sounds good
 
Then you should start working on that goal as soon as you can.
Because most companies fail and software projects fail.
 
I just want to have a meaningful impact on Earth.
 
2:09 PM
So you will likely fail, and thus need time to try again until you succeed.
@SouradeepNanda That's admirable, but vague.
 
@Mitch "Stand word"?
 
I want to have as large as an impact I can before my timer runs out.
 
Dangerous.
Modesty is a virtue!
@caub Oh, cool, I must have missed that!
 
Dangerous and risky, I know. But I crave for adventure.
 
@SouradeepNanda Maybe you should find a start-up and work for them.
Or take up a dangerous hobby
Or go into politics
or activism
A country with 1000% inflation sounds like it has lots of potential for improvement
 
2:12 PM
Politics sounds fun. I might get into it when my beard starts turning grey.
 
Might be too late by then.
 
You'd probably need to start around your mid 30s.
 
Not really, the last president was a nuclear physicist.
 
The last president might've been old, sure.
 
He died recently.
 
2:14 PM
But did he just start out as president or did he have other political jobs before then?
 
I havent checked but he must have some other political office.
Also nuclear physicists are involved in the country's defence so he had contacts.
 
Yeah, being president was probably the ultimate culmination of a long career... either that or maybe there's a reason your nation suffered hyperinflation. =P
 
It is 1000% over 50 years. If you average it out it is 20% per year. It does not qualify as hyper inflation I think.
 
4.9% yearly inflation.
 
@SouradeepNanda "big fish in a small fond" is a related phrase
@SouradeepNanda I think starting skiing from th e top of Mt Everest would be the pinnacle of excitement, terror even.
 
2:28 PM
The pinnacle of death.
 
@SouradeepNanda falling from the top of Mt Everest, you'll leave a sizable crater.
@Cerberus The abyss of life
 
Do you think you'll be alive once you reach the ground?
If you ever made it to the top?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 needle sculpture
bungee-surgery
motocross-tattooing
deep sea butterfly and/or stamp collecting
deep sea butterfly-stamp collecting. they're very rare.
 
That reminds me of the craze of lying on an ironing board in dangerous situations
 
cellphone game playing/chat room chatting while driasdfeUUUUUUU...../////tu7645yr
 
2:39 PM
while being a random character generator?
 
Lying on an ironing board?
 
I think
it was a while ago
it could have just been ironing in dangerous places
ah, it was that
Extreme ironing (also called EI) is an extreme sport and a performance art in which people take ironing boards to remote locations and iron items of clothing. According to the Extreme Ironing Bureau, extreme ironing is "the latest danger sport that combines the thrills of an extreme outdoor activity with the satisfaction of a well-pressed shirt." Part of the attraction and interest the media has shown towards extreme ironing seems to center on the issue of whether it is really a sport or not. It is widely considered to be tongue-in-cheek. Some locations where such performances have taken place...
 
Oh yeah, that.
 
Haha.
What kind of energy did he use?
 
I think I confused extreme ironing and planking
 
2:59 PM
Hey...buddy...do you mind if I borrow your phone? Mine was crushed, along with my skull, in that horrendous car accident.
What? No, I was not 'chatting' on my phone at the time of the accident. I was conferring with my counselor about taking up a hobby. I was following the two-second rule, stay two seconds behind the car in front. Also the other two second rule, only look at your cell phone for at most two seconds before looking back at the road.
does some math
does some more math
maybe that should be a four second rule.
 
Oh, is that a rule?
 
F=ma. It's not just a good idea. it's the law.
 
the "staying two second behind the car in front" is
 
@MattE.Эллен that's just crazy.
@MattE.Эллен That bastard just cut me off!! I'll give you the zero second rule!
drives dangerously parallel to that bastard at high speeds
stares daggers at him
 
@Mitch I'm sure you're a good driver. you're a man afterall
 
3:04 PM
Whoops, two second rule!!
@MattE.Эллен Offensive driving is the best driving, I misheard my driving instructor say
 
@Mitch or maybe he was Greek (at least, that's the impression I get from my girlfriend "μαλάκας!")
 
GT says "masturbator"
Your gf calls you that?
 
You mean that's not a Greek wedding toast?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 not me! other drivers
 
3:35 PM
 
@caub Nice!
France, less than 300 years old?
Some great cultural differences.
I knew people stayed with their parents longer in the south, but this many?
 
4:02 PM
could be culture, could be economics
then again don't the southern countries currently have even lower birth rate than the northern, counter to tradition?
 
Why economics?
It's culture.
Yes, they have low birth rates.
 
The history chat room is empty and that's sad :(
 
Both Catholics and Calvinists used to encourage high birth rates.
 
Speaking of Christians, I was reading about Christianity in colonial America.
It's super interesting! A real melting pot of denominations and dogmas.
But the most interesting thing I read, is that a sermon by Jonathan Edwards entitled "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" helped spur on the Great Awakening.
 
Which made people even more religious?
 
4:14 PM
The political experience that colonists gained from the Great Awakening, where they broke from the Church of England, helped give them the means and rationale for the Revolution.
 
@ktm5124 That is a particularly interesting one.
 
It's where separation of church and state comes from. First, we broke from the Church of England. Then we broke from England.
 
The term Great Awakening can refer to several periods of religious revival in American religious history. Historians and theologians identify three or four waves of increased religious enthusiasm occurring between the early 18th century and the late 19th century. Each of these "Great Awakenings" was characterized by widespread revivals led by evangelical Protestant ministers, a sharp increase of interest in religion, a profound sense of conviction and redemption on the part of those affected, an increase in evangelical church membership, and the formation of new religious movements and denominations...
So, yes, more religious.
Tragic.
 
Yes, definitely more religious.
But the more subtle effect was the political experience gained: for example, petitioning, organizing, uniting.
 
Ugh
 
4:17 PM
Furthermore, the conviction that conscience comes before authority.
 
I guess we won't be having any of those anymore.
 
What? revolutions?
 
@ktm5124 Doesn't the separation of church and state come from the fact that many of the people in America were literally fleeing religious persecution by the governments of Europe?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Actually, no.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Early on in colonial times, church and state were strongly interwoven.
For example, church attendance was mandatory.
Ironically, there was a lot of religious persecution in the colonies, the exception being Pennsylvania which was a shining light.
Quakers were hanged by Puritans.
Baptists were beaten by mobs, etc.
 
@ktm5124 Awakenings
 
4:21 PM
The Establishment Clause of the Religion Clause is the first of several pronouncements in the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, stating, Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof... The Establishment Clause was written by Congressman Fisher Ames in 1789, who derived it from discussions in the First Congress of various drafts that would become the amendments comprising the Bill of Rights. The second half of the Establishment Clause includes the Free Exercise Clause, which guarantees freedom from governmenta...
 
Zombies are getting cliched.
 
> The Establishment Clause addressed the concerns of members of minority faiths who did not want the federal government to establish a state religion for the entire nation. The Baptists in Virginia, for example, had suffered discrimination prior to the disestablishment of the Anglican church in 1786.
 
@Mr. We are talking about colonial America, pre-1776.
 
@ktm5124 Pre 1776 there was separation of church and state? in which states?
 
@Mr. Shiny You also have to consider the events leading up to the establishment of the first amendment.
I think Bushel's Case is relevant here.
 
4:23 PM
Yes, there were a string of events leading up to it. The Great Awakening actually helped lead the colonists to that point.
 
@Tonepoet Yes, I would think centuries of religious oppression in pretty much every European country could constitute "events leading up to the first amendment", would you not?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I rather think it is because they had too many different denominations there, so they couldn't decide on a state religion and force it on people as could be done in many European countries.
 
Some more than others though.
 
They had 5s, 10s, 20s, all of the denominations!
 
William Penn is the man for whom the state of Pennsylvania is named.
 
4:25 PM
@Cerberus But many many colonists came to America specifically because they were of a particular religion that had been persecuted in Europe. You'd think that, given the opportunity, they'd want to avoid a government-mandated religion.
 
Even though orthodox Portestantism dominated the USA, it was not uniform enough to agree on a religious leader and clerical structures. Orthodoc Protestants are that way; in my country, we quip that every family is its own church in rural villages.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 That is the standard story we are taught in school.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Sure, there were those. But surprisingly often the persecuted turn to persecution once in power.
 
@Cerberus I had the vague impression that before the first 'awakening', American colonists as a whole weren't particularly religious. Yes, there were a number of break off sects (puritans, methodists, quakers, etc) but most people were leaving crap back home, and religion wasn't the top of the list once there.
 
More importantly the Bill of Rights was never intended to be applied against state governments. That's just a consequence of the 14th amendment.
 
4:26 PM
@Cerberus Well, true, but as you say, there was no dominant group, and the lessons of "your group might not always be dominant" had been well-learned by Catholics and Anglicans in England.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Like the Dutch Protestants...we protested against our oppression by the Catholic Spaniards, but then we began oppressing our own Catholics as soon as the Spaniards were gone, while telling everyone how tolerant we were.
 
The tenth amendment in particular is just telling the feds. to butt out of those matters.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Let's not forget to consider the Articles of Confederation.
 
Yeah exactly. The persecuted became the persecutors. Puritans were hanging Quakers. Anglicans were beating Baptists.
 
@KitZ.Fox That's more baptist than a three dollar bill!
 
4:27 PM
@Mitch Hmm you think so? That's interesting.
 
States' rights have always been more important than fed rights.
 
@Cerberus The pigs become more human-like at the end of Animal Farm.
 
People rarely learn from history. Not even from things that happened during their own lives.
 
@Cerberus I mean, sure, not everyone learns from history. But one of the best things of the US constitution is how it tries to be a founding document for a country that has actually learned from history.
 
@Mitch Hah, exactly! The Commies did it too.
 
4:29 PM
Why are pigs so discriminated against? They're pretty clever and are pretty cute.
Sorry ugly people.
 
Before everyone got all crazy about how some documents should never, ever change.
Like they don't know what "amendment" means.
 
@KitZ.Fox I gotta admit, I'm not as familiar with those.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Oh, constitutions are often inspired by enlightened ideas. The documents around the foundation of the Dutch Republic were also officially very tolerant and all. But it is true that the American constitution was inspired by the best, untainted ideas of the French (or broader) Enlightenment.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Nine years of the US, until the Constitution replaced them.
 
@Mitch squealy
 
4:31 PM
Which beefed up centralized government and regulated interstate commerce, etc.
 
@KitZ.Fox yeah I'm just not familiar with what they say
 
@ktm5124 The Quakers looking sideways at the Buddhists. The Buddhists being non-committal about the Taoists. The Shakers? Just leave them alone, it'll take care of itself.
 
Also keep in mind that The Constitution was an illegal document under The Articles of the Confederation.
 
lol, "Illegal document"... what a weird concept
 
@Cerberus Experience is the teacher of fools
@Cerberus I don't know. I like it as a story. Maybe it's true.
 
4:33 PM
Then again, the French Revolution also attempted to found a government on very enlightened ideas. Then the Terror came. But still, some ideas did succeed, or re-succeeded after the fall of the restoration in the 19th century.
 
@KitZ.Fox or 'errata'
 
@Mitch Of former fools, then?
The wise may claim to learn from advice, but do they truly learn?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 It's difficult to explain but it has provisions meant to prevent diplomatic coalitions and requires a unanimous vote from the states to amend.
 
@Mitch Hmm well, it would be interesting.
 
@Cerberus In its context, I even appreciate the 2nd Amendment, for how it attempts to preserve liberty and limit government.
 
4:34 PM
Meanwhile, The Constitution states it goes into effect when 3/4ths of the states ratify it, which is obviously not unanimous...
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I don't know it, but I'm sure there are many good things in it, for its time.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 There was this hired-killer who could take a newspaper and roll it up origami like in such a way that he could stab you dead. That's an illegal document.
 
@Cerberus it basically says that sometimes, you need to murder the tyrants in order to restore freedom, so the government isn't allowed to disarm the people.
But the way it's interpreted leads to gun proliferation in a society that loves its guns.
 
But how many new (not slowly changed) constitutions have you seen that were tyrannical and intolerant?
 
starts writing one just to prove Cerb wrong
 
4:36 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Just as burkha's were meant to protect women, or so I've heard. It may have been a good idea at the time.
@Mitch You will write the ELU constitution?
 
@Cerberus Constitutions aren't always documents.
 
Well, you can use the word in a more general sense, is that what you mean?
 
@Cerberus I'll be honest, reading constitutions isn't my hobby. But my impression is that new ones tend to either be ignored or worded in such a way that they don't provide real guarantees. Most new countries these days start off in a rocky place.
 
Sometimes it's as simple as "We have the guns so we make the rules and you had better listen if you don't want a hole somewhere a hole doesn't belong."
 
That's what Foucault would say. Power-Knowledge.
 
4:38 PM
@Cerberus protect women? really? I've never heard that.
 
The reason it's called constitutional law is because it establishes the constituency of government.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 That depends; but they're always very enlightened and noble.
@Tonepoet I would not call that a constitution, at least not in this sense.
 
@Cerberus I guess? Usually they try to sound that way anyway
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Yes: when rape or semi-rape was a problem, it was thought safer for women if they hid in public from potentially violent men, or at least if they hid parts of their body.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Exactly.
 
@Cerberus tempora mutantur
 
4:42 PM
Ita!
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 By the way, have you read about Ortega's latest move?
 
@Cerberus No. Who is Ortega
 
The ruler of Nicaragua.
He had the electoral committee disqualify all opposition members from the upcoming elections a while ago.
But now he has made his wife his running mate.
 
And he explained it thus:
I am ensuring gender equality.
 
@Cerberus It's the simplest form of implied constitution that I can suppose. The U.S.A's. constitution is different in that it's an express constitution. The U.K. has an implied constitution though. I've been reading about it in The Blackstone Institute's Modern American Law, Vol. 16 Constitutional Law and Eminent Domain. You folk might be interested in it. My copy of the book has a final copyright date of 1921, so it's in the public domain under U.S. law.
 
4:47 PM
So he is really very progressive.
 
I saw it on Google Books once but it's tricky for me to find. Let's see if I can do so now.
 
@Tonepoet Well, I think that stretches the term constitution rather too far.
You can use the word constitution in a very general sense, as in, the way a state is made up.
But then you should leave any notion of documents behind, so no "implied".
 
Tacit perhaps is a better word?
 
I don't think so.
Either you use it in the narrow sense, "a binding document that determines how the state is organised", or in the general sense, "the way the state is organised".
Or that is how I would use the word.
An "implied constitution" smacks of Americanism, even though no doubt not intended that way.
Or the -ism of some other country with a very important constitution.
By the way, is the word "smack" ever used in the same sense outside that particular expression?
 
In the sense the book describes, it is the law that dictates the relationship between the government and its subjects, in a generalized sense.
 
4:55 PM
I would call the general concept a constitution, or a particular document explicitly so titled, but not the laws themselves that determine this general constition, if they are not named a "constitution".
 
@Tonepoet Are you in law school? Or a lawyer?
 
@ktm5124 No, but I take an interest in the subject.
 
The reason is that it suggests that a "real" constitution is a very powerful document, whereas in reality the constitution is only very powerful in some countries that have an official constitution, but not in others that have one.
 
@Tonepoet I'm interested in learning more about law too.
 
Weaker constitution are still "real" constitutions.
 
4:57 PM
So in simple terms, what is the difference between an implied constitution and an express one?
 
What Tonepoet means by an implied constitution is laws that are not called a constitution but that behave much like the American constitution.
 
I see.
 
Consider, for example, the Dutch constitution.
There isn't much in it.
 
Is that implied also?
Hah.
 
@Cerberus Writing up the intolerance enforcement provisions now.
 
4:59 PM
It only contains the most basic rules, and a few general articles about human rights.
 
@Cerberus You should move here. Then you too will have constitutional rights.
 
@ktm5124 It has some advantages, yes.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Exactly. Tibet. Or the exposed parts of Spitzbergen
 

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