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12:57 AM
Hey >3K rep SO users, can someone send this to oblivion?
 
 
17 hours later…
5:57 PM
Good evening!
I am fairly new to Linux and I have question regarding users. When I use the useradd command I don't specify a password. I must use the passwd afterwards. Does this mean that the user is disabled until it is done?
 
slm
6:13 PM
@LuckyLuke - yes they're effectively disabled since they don't have a password to gain access to their account.
 
6:53 PM
hello
anybody here?
 
slm
@LuckyLuke - see my comments on the Q
 
yep
 
slm
Not able to talk at length, in and out.
 
ok
Do I use sudo postgres then?
 
slm
no, sudo is the command to elevate your credentials. You give it commands you want to run. In this case the command is "su - postgres"
 
7:08 PM
If I do su - postgres it asks for a password?
 
slm
su - postgres by itself requires postgres' password. When you do `sudo su - postgres it requires your password to prove that you're you.
once you prove it's you, then it will "remember" this for like 5 minutes, and then ask you again.
 
Sorry for asking a dumb question now: But why does sudo su - postgres work? Is it because I prove I have root access?
 
slm
you have sudo rights to run commands. Look in the file /etc/sudoers. Your username is listed there as having rights, most likely the ability to do anything as root.
sudo more /etc/sudoers
A line like this: saml ALL=(ALL) ALL, where saml is the user name
it says I have all rights to run anything
man sudoers for more info
 
Yes
 
slm
@LuckyLuke - if that wasn't clear to you feel free to add some details to one of the answers making it clearer. It's likely not clear to others that will happen upon your Q&A
 
7:18 PM
I am unsure if I understand why sudo su - postgres require my password instead of the postgres password. Is the end result that I run the command as postgres or root?
 
you must read it as separated process..
sudo = you become root
as root you execute su to change user to postgres
is like doing sudo -i then su - postgress
just that with sudo you can do it all in a single line
 
slm
I have to leave, if you have further Q's post them here and either I'll get them later or someone else can.
When you run commands via sudo you're root, you just don't know root password.
ex:
$ sudo whoami
root
 
7:53 PM
@Braiam Thank you
@slm Thank you
I think I understand it a little better
I will try to read some more on it too
 
 
2 hours later…
9:29 PM
@Braiam tosses nickel at you yes, here's a nickel, kid. get yourself a real shell. go zsh.
 
slm
Uh I don't use zsh
 
@strugee the worse that I've seen is the Ctrl + arrows doesn't work :(
 
that was a thin reference to the Dilbert comic strip on Unix, btw
@Braiam what were you expecting them to do? also, the default zsh configuration is much more dismal than bash's
you should try oh-my-zsh. github.com/robbyrussell/oh-my-zsh, if there's no typos
honestly zsh is crazy awesome. the only feature it doesn't have is smallness. it's so clever, it will learn hostnames you type in front of ssh and autocomplete them in the future
 
slm
Bash does that too, the host names in front of commands
I use that every day
scp ssh etc. they all have hostnames in front of them
I seem to remember going down the zsh road before and being like meh, I know there are all the extras that Gilles and Stephane tout wrt wildcards and I appreciate that but unlearning Bash at this point is more work, IMO
 
9:46 PM
@slm yeah, I get that. tbh, I mostly like it for the community frameworks (e.g. oh-my-zsh). I've never really bothered to customize my shell manually...
 
slm
If it's a machine that you control you can use zsh, but I deal with a daily barage of other OSes and distros etc. and they all typically go with Bash as the default in /etc/passwd, so my hands a little forced in that regard.
 
the other thing I like is that when you tab-complete it doesn't leave turds on your console and then give you a second prompt
 
slm
@strugee - yeah I used to customize my env. but then I'd go through an update and it would all be lost so going w/ the defaults is just easier. Even using aliases I find vane attempts b/c I'll be on some other machine that won't have them and then I"m like WTF was that command?
but I realize I'm making excuses for a subpar shell in comparison, but I deal w/ Windows too and it's a subpar OS
2
 
I never really work with systems that aren't my own but yeah, I can see how that would be a problem. I've never seen any distro with zsh as the default, and there's probably a reason for that
@slm that's why I version-control my dotfiles. I work with about 4-6 installs on different occasions, never have any problems. I keep everything in ~/config and then symlink everything
 
slm
That's really the major reason to me, and why we get so many Q's here too, think of the more elegant solutions that Steph. or Gilles put out wrt to the wildcard expansions and we have to bend through hoops with sed/awk/etc. when the shell could simply do it
 
9:49 PM
wrt Windows: same. I use Cygwin.
 
slm
@strugee - might be worth a Q&A for you to write that up
 
@slm write what up?
 
slm
I just scp and use Sparkleshare to maintain my files that I rsync from there
your setup, how you do it
 
ah
 
slm
i'd be interested
I use etckeeper for systems but neglect my homedirs
 
9:50 PM
something like "how do I sync dotfiles with version control?"
 
slm
yeah w/ a slant to homedir files
answer it with your setup
 
I think we already have this question
I still have my dotfiles under cvs, but I recommend a dcvs to anyone starting now
I'll probably switch in the next decade or so
 
slm
I think it might be here as well, but search for it first anyway, if it's not there then ask, otherwise add your answer to that Q if it does and doesn't have your A
 
@slm yeah I've used etckeeper on two systems - one an Ubuntu Server, and another an Arch box that replaced the Ubuntu Server box. it was OK on Ubuntu but on Arch it killed, since there aren't hooks in pacman
 
slm
Yeah that's the trouble w/ it
 
9:59 PM
@Gilles were you thinking of this:
48
Q: Tips for putting ~ under source control

Dan McClainI want to put my home directory (~) under source control (git, in this case), as I have many setting files (.gitconfig, .gitignore, .emacs, etc.) in there I would like to carry across machines, and having them in git would make it nice for retrieving them. My main machine is my MacBook, and th...

?
@slm: zsh will suggest corrections to commands too e.g. sl (if you don't have the actual sl installed) gets you "correct sl to ls? [nyae]? "
 
@strugee yes
 
ah
 
slm
@Gilles @terdon - CVS, I still use RCS, I use that for etc and sometimes for home dir items
@strugee CVS, I still use RCS, I use that for etc and sometimes for home dir items
 
10:17 PM
looks like other people use my setup, pretty much. I basically have @Gilles' setup here: unix.stackexchange.com/a/1884/29146
except I don't have system-specific folders. I just write portable scripts
 
slm
@strugee - yeah Gilles approach is how I do it as well.
 
@slm except you rsync ~/lib or ~/configs or ~/foo, instead of version control, right?
 
slm
I use several methods, this is one. Depends. At home I generally just rsync the contents since I'm using rcs
at work I use SVN and git for things
but it's all organic, kind of a mess 8-)
but the point is that I keep things backed up and under VCS
things I care about
i've also used dropbox and sparkleshare to get the DB off of the box
 
ah, makes sense. i just use git no matter what :)
 
slm
Yeah if I were to start over I would standardize on that
 
10:25 PM
haha the guy who asked that question has 352 rep and all of it is from that question (except for the base 100)
 
slm
problem is there are many things already in flight over time you start to accumulate all these "tests" of methods
 
?
 
slm
yeah i see ppl here from time to time that have literally 1 Q that makes up all their rep
 
do you mean things like "oh, I'll try foo for this project and see how it goes" accumulate?
 
slm
I mean I've tried many of these methods, RCS, CVS, SVN, GIT, etc. and am currently using all of them in some form, mainly b/c I'm too lazy to switch them out.
yup
 
10:26 PM
heh
 
slm
I love to try things out
but hate to commit
it's a blessing and a curse
 
yeah I'm a complete neophile
except with GNOME 3
 
slm
sometime the experience becomes an anchor
you're only like 14-18, right?
I'm 40, so 30+ yrs. of collecting crap
 
yeah I'm 15 so I really like to hear people talk about things they still have from decades ago because then I get to chuckle to myself and say, "that'll never happen to me!"
knowing all the while that, well, of course it will
 
slm
it always happens, I'm a bit of a packrat so that magnifies the problem
I have several TB's of files on my NAS that are old RPMs tarballs etc. I have literally no idea what they are
 
10:38 PM
yeah I have like 25 CDs that I have lying around - a couple Arch images, a bunch of Ubuntu images (some different flavored of the same version), a couple Plan 9 images and some misc stuff
I should get rid of them. but, I won't.
 
slm
That's how it starts 8-)
I wish I had these resources available when I was 15, you're lucky!
@strugee - You focusing on any particular things or just learning as much as you can?
 
11:00 PM
@slm mostly just learning as much as I can. I either want to hack on or sysadmin for GNU or Mozilla when I grow up
it's interesting to grow up right now because computers are old, but not that old. history is still being made. people (read: governments and Hollywood) are still trying to figure out how to deal with the internet
maybe I'll go into academia. the Mach kernel and Plan 9 are fascinating
 
11:24 PM
oh, and on the subject of having resources - you should read Alex Payne's article On The iPad. it's a great read.
 

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