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1:03 AM
@M.A.R. eben, je, doch, so, na
@M.A.R. it seems extremely implausible that it is ... biotic?
 
 
1 hour later…
2:07 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Few unique characters in answer (87): Can protagonist be an antagonist, and vise versa? by phatmong on english.SE
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted user (71): Key Quotes from "The Crucible" by phatmong on english.SE
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted user (71): Key Quotes from "The Crucible" by phatmong on english.SE
 
 
5 hours later…
6:43 AM
I'm not panicking. This is how I normally run away.
 
 
1 hour later…
8:07 AM
> 11 ways to fix America’s fundamentally broken democracy:

1) First things first: Get rid of the filibuster
2) Stop voting rights violations before they happen
3) Eliminate registration as an obstacle to voting
4) Make it as easy as possible to vote
5) Stop running elections on the cheap
6) A tax credit for all voters
7) Fix Senate malapportionment
8) Allow the states to neutralize the Electoral College
9) Stop gerrymandering
10) Public financing for candidates
11) Prevent Trump’s judges from sabotaging voting reforms
 
@Mitch Phosphine is just a biosignature that's less error-prone. Especially in the amounts detected. If we knew all about the chemistry at Venus and were certain the source could not be chemical the enthusiasm would've been wholly warranted, but I think there's no reason not to assume our knowledge is very lacking in that regard.
Of course, it could also be some miscalibration or other error, which would be a very big bummer.
But investigating it will at the very least give us something we didn't know of before. With all the weirdos at the bottom of the oceans and acidic volcanoes and what else, I dunno what to expect from organisms, how unlikely it'd be for them to be floating in mid-air
 
9:19 AM
> There had to be something she could do besides sit there at the table with her head in her hands and wait for news.
> Don't you two have something you need to do besides sitting here and questioning me about what I did this past weekend with my wife in bed?
I'm a little surprised.
 
10:05 AM
> In case of delay in delivery of the Products for more than thirty (30) working days, the Buyer shall be entitled to unilaterally refuse the ordered Products by notifying the Supplier in writing.
Is it okay - to refuse the products? It seems to me that reject the products might be more natura.
 
 
3 hours later…
12:38 PM
@Færd Both sound OK to me.
The infinitive was originally a noun, by the way.
Not so dissimilar from the gerund.
@Færd Not bad. But my number one would be: get rid of 'first past the post' everywhere.
Number two: make the presidency a mostly ceremonial function.
Putting that much power in the hands of one person is no good.
It is its own, extreme expression of 'first past the post'. The winner gets all power, all other parties get zero power.
 
@CowperKettle No, refuse is the correct word there. It means to refuse physically to take delivery of the products (in case the supplier tries to send them after the due date).
 
1:26 PM
@Robusto Thank you!
It's getting cold. +9 C today, and drizzle that have turned to rain which will continue till the end of the next day
 
@M.A.R. But as far as complexity of theories goes, I feel it would be more plausible that there is a non-biotic source of phosphene than there is an analog to the terrestrial animal gut production of it.
But, then again, that would make a boring headline. 'Obscure chemical discovered on Venus'.
I can't complain about them ginning up the headline because science in the new always = cool, and it really doesn't affect us daily (unlike vaccine or treatment hype currently).
But I'm always annoyed by 'life on other planets' idea because it's always couched (or maybe I just hear it that way) in terms of 'life may have come from other planets' and that doesn't explain anything -at all-.
It just kicks the can down the road.
So where did -that- life come from?
@Færd It's hard for me to tell those apart. like they're both some kind of ellipsis, or maybe 'besides' can be a preposition or an adverb. double the frequency isn't so different...I'd think it weird if it was 10 to 1.
 
1:43 PM
God created life in the form of farting venusian bacteries. After the bacteries sinned, some of them were exiled to Earth.
 
That sounds like the start of a scifi novel written together by CS Lewis and Gary Larsen.
 
2:27 PM
I liked books by CS Lewis, I read them about 15 years ago.
I had a friend who loved his philosophical books, or whatever they are called; his religious philosophy works.
 
2:45 PM
if you can smell my colon as I walk by, I apologise, I had spicy food last night
 
If you can smell my colon as I walk by: there's something wrong with you, you are smelling punctuation!
 
Synaesthesia
 
Synesthesia or synaesthesia is a perceptual phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway. People who report a lifelong history of such experiences are known as synesthetes. Awareness of synesthetic perceptions varies from person to person. In one common form of synesthesia, known as grapheme–color synesthesia or color–graphemic synesthesia, letters or numbers are perceived as inherently colored. In spatial-sequence, or number form synesthesia, numbers, months of the year, or days of the week elicit...
 
i can't understand why people like the smell of colon, to me it's just offal
6
 
That is absolutely brilliant awful!
Sorry, offal.
 
3:03 PM
:D
 
3:18 PM
> Heralded as a “Swedish project for truly sustainable shipping,” the wPCC is currently being developed by the consortium and is expected to be sailing by the end of 2024.
Looks cool
Will be able to transport 6000 automobiles
 
interesting
 
it looks good. I hope it works.
 
3:35 PM
@Robusto and @tchrist for your listening and reading-along pleasure:
Wait a couple seconds for it all to load. Then click play and wait for another ten seconds for the musicians to play the first note.
Lazy musicians.
 
@Cerberus Ha. That worked. Thank you
 
3:51 PM
@CowperKettle well, submarines can already stay in water for decades. I think the reason most ships can't is because refuels were cheaper
@CowperKettle ew, disgusting fetish of the year
@Mitch if life in Venus is still at the anaerobic stage it might not mean much in the temporal sense but it wouldn't give the alien life theory much credence I think.
I've heard the "maybe life is alien" theory before but I never gave too much thought to it. It seemed like wishful thinking at best and pseudoscience at worst. No way would some random chemicals on a few asteroids or meteors which I think form the entire theoretical foundation of the theory suddenly reach that conclusion. Occam's razor is important to follow in these things.
Well, semi random.
And incidentally, I'm aware that Occam's Gillette would predict the phosphine would have a chemical source
 
@M.A.R. ummm... actually it's a perfectly reasonable theory as far as I know and can tell. We know that certain complex organic chemicals are found (and have been found) on meteorites. Including amino acids.
 
@terdon and don't the simple models about how amino acids formed in the pre-life Earth adequately explain their formation? AFAIK the biggest mystery is getting to complex RNAs, not whether natural phenomena could reliably produce amino acids and that next step that I forgot
 
@M.A.R. I'm not sure. As far as I know, they do go a long way towards explaining the emergence of complex chemicals, yes. But the fact that we know for certain that some complex molecules exist on meteorites cannot be ignored either.
 
So if we've found RNA on asteroids that'd be a really interesting checkpoint, but ATM it sounds like investigating simple biomolecules on asteroids would tell us a few things but very unlikely what we're looking for there
It sounds to me a bit like the faster than light theories that are compatible with the current physics. Good for sci fi writers, but don't mean much for scientists, at least yet
 
4:07 PM
> The delivery shall be made by self-pickup (self-delivery) of the Products from the Supplier's warehouse (the warehouse address is specified in the Invoice/specification).
I think I should edit that to collection by Supplier, meaning the Supplier himself must go and collect the bought products.
The Russian term самовывоз basically means self-outhauling, but it could be replaced with collection.
 
"Delivery will be in the form of collection by Supplier"?
 
The Multitran dictionary provides a bevy of proposed translations for Russian самовывоз and many of them seem awkward multitran.com/…
Will call refers to a method of delivery for purchased goods where the customer picks up the goods at the seller's place of business, primarily in North American commerce. It may also refer to the department within a business where goods are staged for customer pick up. An equivalent service for goods which are paid for in installments then retrieved once fully paid, which was common before credit cards became available, is called layaway, and is still used among those without access to credit cards. The word "call" is a shortened form of "call for", which means "to come and get", so "will call...
Interesting term, never heard of it.
 
A Robert Zemeckis movie
Good Will Call
Starring Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts, Robin Williams
Been online for too long. BBL
 
Have a good offline time!
Go for a jog!
 
@Mitch Maybe!
 
4:15 PM
Or for a lawn tennis match.
 
@Cerberus I didn't know that!
@Cerberus yeah but I think the article tried to be practical and politically feasible in the short term. Like, it could say "get rid of the Electoral College" but it didn't; rather, it showed the way to its abolition: "Allow the states to neutralize the Electoral College".
@Cerberus I think if the Senate seats weren't so extremely malapportioned and some other checks and balances weren't castrated by undemocratic influences, there would be more effective power-sharing in the US government.
 
@Færd Fair enough.
@Færd Perhaps a little bit.
But I think it won't improve significantly as long as winner-take-all remains in force.
 
@M.A.R. RNA has a very, very short half-life, so that's unlikely to ever happen.
 
While it does, there is absolutely no incentive to coöperate with the other party.
You win everything, so you can ignore the other side.
The next time, you win or lose, but having assisted the former underdog won't help you either way.
 
4:33 PM
@Cerberus That's an interesting point. I need to look more into it.
But it's mostly the presidency, right?
 
@Færd Also parliament.
The only time you really need to coöperate is when the same party does not control both houses of parliament and the presidency.
 
And if the field of political activism isn't only the backyard of party elites and market forces, then cooperation could occur on that level too, even in the presidential and Congress/Senate elections.
 
I'm not sure I understand.
 
There have been noteworthy instances of cooperation within the Senate and the Congress in the past years. They have handed some powers to the president, which should be reclaimed.
 
There have been instances, but they are becoming fewer and fewer.
Whereas, in a pluralistic system, there is lots of coöperation all the time.
 
4:36 PM
That's also because one party doesn't need to secure the majority of the votes to remain in power.
 
Of course a coalition government with majorities in both houses will still force its will upon the rest, but to a lesser degree, and more reasonably: they know they may need to form a coalition with some opposition parties next time.
 
They get to be irresponsible to most people's demands with impunity.
@Cerberus Hmm.
 
@Færd I'm not sure I understand this either.
 
@Cerberus If you can win the office without having to win the popular vote, then you get to distance your goals from what the nation demands of you.
And leave less room for cooperation.
 
@Færd Okay, but, in practice, you have to get pretty close to the majority of the popular vote to win.
So I'm not entirely sure whether the difference between 48.9% (Trump 2016) and 50% is all that important.
 
4:41 PM
@Cerberus Cooperation can occur between elected officials, and also between grassroots organizations, popular movements, etc.
It's not only the former thta matters.
 
Yes, it can.
And, yes, elected politicians aren't the only thing that matters.
But it matters a lot.
And the money invested in their campaigns, the polarisation, tends to poison civil society as well, in the longer term.
 
So cooperation can occur in a first-past-the-post system if democratic forces from below are not debilitated thru things like big business buying officials into office.
 
Civil society can be understood as the "third sector" of society, distinct from government and business, and including the family and the private sphere. By other authors, civil society is used in the sense of 1) the aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens or 2) individuals and organizations in a society which are independent of the government.Sometimes the term civil society is used in the more general sense of "the elements such as freedom of speech, an independent judiciary, etc, that make up a democratic society" (Collins English...
 
@Cerberus Yeah that money could be regulated
 
@Færd Yeah, that is another big problem.
 
4:44 PM
Is the German "so" like the English "so" in "I think so"? (I know the other "therefore" usage is English-only)
 
@M.A.R. It can be.
Though that usage is less common than in English.
For example, you could not translate that using so in German.
Ich denke so / so denke ich means something else.
 
@Færd It can, but polarisation, caused by a bipartisan system, caused by first past the post, works strongly against it.
 
@Cerberus You may well be right. I'm going to look for concrete studies on this sometime.
One thing that's a bit fuzzier in parliamentary systems than in presidential ones is separation of powers, I guess.
 
@M.A.R. Wow, look at those minorities in the Democratic representatives. Many more than expected, considering the average level of education and other socio-economic means among minorities.
@Færd Yeah, that is an issue.
 
4:49 PM
Oh! Now I see where "Mary is so tall as Kim" comes from. It's these little Eureka's that make learning a related language so fun
 
> The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has granted emergency approval for the use of a coronavirus vaccine, six weeks after human trials in the Gulf state started.
 
@CowperKettle what do these emergency approvals skip? Just paperwork?
 
In another news report,
 
A coalition government is often at least partly manned by politicians from the coalition parties. And the other ministers are normally affiliated with the coalition parties here.
 
> Wu Guizhen, head of biosafety at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, said she expected Chinese vaccines for Covid-19 would soon be available to the public as soon as November or December.
@M.A.R. They might overlook some rare side effects
 
4:51 PM
@M.A.R. Yeah, syntax becomes so much more transparent when you keep an eye on other languages and historic usage for comparison.
 
I read somewhere that it usually takes 2 full years for a fast-track development of a vaccine.
 
@Cerberus You mean unelected politicians sway the government?
 
With covid, this has been compressed from 2 years to several months.
 
The big problem with rushing vaccines is that it may undermine the people's trust in vaccination as a whole, if, say, there turns out to be a serious side-effect that affects one in ten thousand. You could have thousands of dead amongst vaccinated but otherwise healthy people. And what if the effect only manifests itself after one year?
 
@Cerberus Yeah that shaky trust shouldn't be taken for granted.
 
4:53 PM
@Færd I was expanding on your point: the line between government and coalition majority in parliament is often blurred. Our ministers are almost all affiliated with the coalition parties.
 
Ah.
 
@Cerberus this. Definitely this.
 
America used some sort of vaccination programme to track down Bin Laden (I think?), which made many people distrust medical personnel in some regions.
 
:|
 
> CIA organised fake vaccination drive to get Osama bin Laden's family DNA

Senior Pakistani doctor who organised vaccine programme in Abbottabad arrested by ISI for working with US agents
Was that really worth it?
 
4:56 PM
Probably not.
But we're talking about the Mafia Don.
So responsibilty is less of an issue.
 
Who?
 
The US government.
 
Yeah.
 
Oh by the way, speaking of cooperation, the two parties have often had remarkable cooperation on foreign policy, the military industrial complex, etc.
 
Yeah it is still possible.
But getting worse.
 
5:00 PM
Hmm yeah in some areas
@M.A.R. Nice
 
5:16 PM
@CowperKettle I've only ever seen the phrase 'Will Call', just those two words, in the lobby of a theater (live not cinema) or orchestra. There's one (or more) ticket counters to get a ticket to the performance, but often there's a single window/teller labeled 'Will Call' where you can pick up tickets that were purchased ahead of time. That's the only place I've ever ever seen those two words by themselves like that.
And it sounds weird... the elision is not usually how you expect English to work. You're left wondering who 'will call' what? Why are they calling because you're just picking up.a ticket? And why 'will' because if a call was made, it was done already in the past. It looks like it is supposed to make sense, but nothing really does.
 
@Mitch I also don't understand the meaning of Will Call. I thought the word Call meant visit, as in "I, the customer, will visit this location to pick up my ordered ticket/loaf of bread/etc."
 
5:55 PM
> 8 January 1846: Line from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to Lancaster, Pennsylvania opens. The first telegram from Harrisburg to Lancaster was "Why don't you write, you rascals?"
 
6:20 PM
@CowperKettle OK, that makes some sense, but still, didn't you visit already to place the order and why didn't you pick it up then? Which is to say it needs a lot of backstory to make it sound natural to me. Maybe when the phrase was originally used it made a lot more sense in context with technology then.
@tchrist @Robusto It is a 'clear' day this afternoon in the Boston area, but It's not a very deep shade of blue, very very light pastel blue. maybe it's particulate from fires out west finally reaching here. If I hadn't known about the fires, I probably wouldn't notice. Will check again later towards sunset.
 
6:55 PM
@Mitch It's pretty general all over the US now.
@RegDwigнt Noice. Good hearing real musicians on MuseScore. Real violins instead of General MIDI facsimiles.
 
What is green?
 
So, what is the Christian god's favorite chord? Why, Gsus!
@Cerberus Test stations showing clear air (clear meaning below a certain level of pollutants).
 
Ah, OK.
So it's all in the west.
 
@Cerberus The worst stuff is in the west, yes.
Green doesn't mean pure. It just means below a certain level.
I.e., not dangerous to most people.
 
Right.
 
@Mitch Image not found.
 
Forbidden
 
Verboten?
 
mah dudes, give me a second!
 
Apparently.
 
7:11 PM
hm...mp4's not allowed?
how do you do animated gifs?
 
Yeah, Reddit is probably blocking embedded loading of images.
Or it is blocking access to the gif via a direct link.
 
reddit seems to only allow downloading as mp4
and there's a whole rigamarole to converting mp4 to gif (and QuickPlayer on my Mac doesn't do it)
Anyway what the picture shows is an animation of a map like Robusto's with the pattern of smoke moving eastward
 
I didn't know smoke could travel that far.
 
7:40 PM
@Robusto from that I take it you click on Adam Neely's videos as soon as they come out.
That one sure was all full of Gsuses. A nice subplot.
In other news, earlier today through vanity-googling I actually bumped into a piece of mine on YouTube.
As in, not myself playing it on my own channel.
But someone else's arrangement of it. ("Experimental remix", they call it.)
And not a live performance, either. All a MIDI facsimile all the time.
But still.
I now know what it feels like to be rich and famous. Yay!
 
@RegDwigнt Not exactly. I waited a day this time.
 
Oh.
I thought it said like "thirty minutes ago" when I watched it an hour ago.
I struggle with reading.
 
I see. That's why we go over this stuff.
 
Sorry, can't read that.
Is that French?
 
French toast.
 
7:50 PM
That I can read.
It often has pictures of Gsus on it, too.
 
Gsus saves.
 
Yes. That way you can actually have your Gsus and eat it, too.
 
Perhaps. Perhaps, perhaps.
 
(Nice.)
 
7:52 PM
If you can't make your mind up we'll never get started.
 
What do you call the wrinkle at the top of a tie? I think it has a name.
 
There's a wrinkle at the top of a tie?
 
I'm trying to show someone over the internet how to tie a tie for a wedding.
 
checks all the ties in the house
@Robusto by the way, that is one hell of a video description
Best video description, ever, actually.
> cover and song
Is all it says.
For once, someone on the Internet is actually 100% correct.
 
7:57 PM
Anyway, why are you trying to explain it yourself. There's tons of images for every knot I should think.
 
Looks like a windsor to me.
 
It is.
What do you call the crease that goes under the knot?
 
Yes I see what you mean now. I thought maybe you meant the wrinkle that sometimes forms at the very top of the horizontal bit.
Well, good question, for I am sure it absolutely does have a name.
 
No. The one that goes underneath.
 
7:58 PM
Probably French.
That would be a good SWR for once.
Maybe save it up for Christmas.
But I don't know the answer right now.
 
It's called a dimple.
I originally Googled "wrinkle at the top of a tie" and that failed, but "crease at the top of a tie" worked.
 
Hm. Well that's a bit anticlimactic. But it is French.
As is anticlimactic, for that matter.
> c. 1400, "natural transient small dent in some soft part of the human body," especially that produced in the cheek of a young person by the act of smiling, perhaps from an Old English as a word meaning "pothole," perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *dumpilaz, which has yielded words in other languages meaning "small pit, little pool" (such as German Tümpel "pool," Middle Low German dümpelen, Dutch dompelen "to plunge").
See. Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps.
I say it's French.
Protogermans didn't wear no ties.
 
Oh is it the one where he said science was wrong?
I saw that bit on the German evening news an hour ago.
 
He said it would just get cooler. Be patient.
Like he said Covid would just "go away."
How's that workin' out for ya, Don?
 
8:05 PM
Yes, and then someone had the balls to say "but not according to science".
And he fucking smiled and said that he was right and science wasn't.
> Where did you take your inspiration from for this piece?
Someone asking me that just now. The fuck is that question. The fuck can you answer.
I sat at my instrument and played the first eight bars.
Then realized it would be better if there were a couple more bars after that.
And then you just go A-B-C-B-A, and add a coda.
But you can't answer that. You have to answer some shit like "I looked out of the window and the leaves were falling". Or "I felt this or that or something".
I need to become Shostakovich real quick. Nobody ever asked him that.
 
@RegDwigнt If you knew that you could reproduce it. And you can't. Or at least I can't.
Inspiration just comes.
 
Yeah. The music is in the air. If it isn't in the air, it isn't anywhere else, either.
You can't just look up your sleeve or under the sofa. Or out of the window.
It's always nice to say that you did, but you really didn't.
 
It can't be cultured like pearls.
 
Pearls can be cultured as pearls
checkmate athesits!
 
Well you can take a seed. Indeed that's what I always do. Just play three notes. Any notes. Sometimes only two. Sometimes even just one.
But the thing is, no seed will grow without water and air and sunlight.
It needs to want to grow. If it wants to, you just follow it wherever it takes you. Again, it's in the air.
You can play the same note 13 times in a row, and it won't want to go anywhere.
Or you can play the same note 13 times in a row, and out of it blossoms the 2nd movement of Beethoven's 7th.
 
8:20 PM
I just successfully taught someone how to tie a tie. Over the Internet. My work here is done.
 
That is impressive indeed. That's like teaching someone the bassoon over the internet.
 
@RegDwigнt 'dame pleine', ' dumpling'
 
Less work than bassoon, though.
 
It's so obvious
 
@Mitch The opera ain't over till the dumpling sings.
 
8:22 PM
@Robusto I think you will find that many people when presented with the choice might beg to differ.
@Mitch remplis ta dame vide, vide ta dame pleine ?
 
The opera ain't over till the "full lady" sings.
 
haha
Well there you go.
Etymology 101. Only here in this room, one night only.
Sep 10 at 12:44, by RegDwigнt
Walk in, walk in, everyone watch the show.
 
Why I don't mind if I do hammond my organ for a bit.
 
Roll up! Roll up! Roll up! See the show!
 
8:31 PM
Yeah and it sounds like one heck of a show alright. I'd totally see it. Where can I see it now.
 
I think you have to be in a wheelchair. Otherwise why "Roll up!"?
 
Maybe they do mean your sleeves?
Or a tie, even.
 
Sleeves? It's a "hands on" show?
 
Well I've not seen it yet, so your guess is as good as mine.
> I do not own this song.
Another great video description.
This day will go down in history as the day of great video descriptions.
In unrelated questions, just how long is this track. It can't possibly go for the full thirty minutes, can it now.
 
Why not?
On the original Brain Salad Surgery album it was cut in two because it couldn't fit on one side.
Another reason vinyl sucks.
 
8:37 PM
I'm not arguing against it doing so. I'm wondering if it will.
This sounds from that era where every song was 11 minutes long. Even Elton John songs.
 
There are three movements, if that is what you mean.
 
Also, they're now promising a queen covered in vaseline, so they do keep the intrigue up, so it's fine.
@Robusto yes the first one just ended for me. With a couple chords that could straight up be in John Miles' Music.
And now it's all jazz piano all the time.
 
Curiously, no Cardi B in it at all.
 
I've successfully avoided everything about her but her name.
So this could be a 100% copy of one of her pieces, and I wouldn't know.
> [someone] posted discussion "My Song" to group "Counterpoint and Fugue"
Hello, this is my first Fugue. Please let me know your thoughts, or add some constructive Criticism.
Jesus Christ, I need popcorn.
That's the only group on all of MuseScore where some of the people actually know what they're doing.
And that's this guy's business card he's showing there. Calling a Fugue a Song.
This won't go down well.
 
@RegDwigнt Perhaps you mean "Gsus Christ, I need popcorn"?
 
8:48 PM
Yes sorry my Anglish is not gut.
 
You missed my Gemütlichkeit joke, btw.
 
I sure must've, seeing how I have no idea what you're on about.
Also, why is Emerson now playing In the Navy by the Village People.
Is it part of the show?
 
It's a dynamo!
 
yesterday, by Robusto
@M.A.R. Yet only one for Gemütlichkeit. And all the languages have to share it.
 
8:52 PM
I searched for the word just now but nothing came up.
0 messages found.
 
I don't think the search can speak German.
 
I don't think the search can search.
 
Instead I searched for "languages" and found it.
 
That's cheating.
 
That's me.
 
8:53 PM
How'm I s'posta know.
Anyway. I have no idea what @M.A.R. is on about there.
German has the normal number of words for these things.
 
@RegDwigнt Neither did I. But I decided to riff on it anyway.
 
And almost no words for anything else.
They have like three words in total, and then they just combine them in all kinds of different ways.
Well the finale is unexpected. Are they playing Pong now or what. Or is this Space Invaders.
Anyway. That was a quality 29 minutes 35. But I guess I should start preparing for tomorrow.
We are still playing the Bach double violin concerto, but last week on top of that my teacher said she remembered 44 (!) pieces by Bartok that we must also play. All at once.
And then literally a day later I discovered those 5 pieces by Shostakovich.
And then a couple piano etudes by Lack, which I now also want to play on the violin.
And that piece of mine that someone else arranged for strings.
That will be a busy one hour tomorrow.
Oh, by the way, the other week I ran into a hilarious tempo marking. Also in Bartok, but not in any of those 44 pieces. Was some etude in an old piano book of mine that I had as a kid.
It said "quasi a tempo".
I sat there literally laughing for a good twenty seconds.
 
Sort of back to the tempo?
 
Well the editor was helpful with his own interpretation, by providing his M.M.s.
He said go to 146 instead of the 162 that would be tempo primo.
But the thing is, I have no idea if that's what it actually means, plus the passage in question is completely unremarkable. Both technically and musically. He may as well be trolling, for all the sense that it makes.
And you know you can't put it past Bartok that he's just fucking trolling you.
He could write "spaghetti with meatballs" over a random bar somewhere and you'd just have to nod approvingly.
 
@RegDwigнt For science!
 
9:18 PM
Do note the fingering as well.
Trolling is a art.
Anyway, nice talking to you but I shall be off for now.
Nighty-night.
 
CYA
@RegDwigнt Dafuq? What's wrong with 5-3, 4-2, 3-1? Unless it's supposed to sound very detached, perhaps?
In which case there are markings for that.
 
 
2 hours later…
11:08 PM
@Robusto and @tchrist Confirmed from the ground...boston area unnaturally hazy well above the horizon, orange-red sun at tree top level, not visible just below.
 
11:50 PM
@Mitch Them's the signs.
@skullpatrol It just gets worse and worse.
 

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