« first day (3139 days earlier)      last day (71 days later) » 

7:18 AM
> Origin of regurgitate:
Late 16th century from medieval Latin regurgitat-, from the verb regurgitare, from Latin re- ‘again, back’ + gurges, gurgit- ‘whirlpool’.
You would think it was cognate with gurgle, but maybe not. Are there other English cognates coming from that root?
Voracious comes unexpectedly close:
> History and Etymology for voracious
Latin vorac-, vorax, from vorare to devour; akin to Old English ācweorran to guzzle, Latin gurges whirlpool, Greek bibrōskein to devour
Then so does vortex, probably.
 
 
2 hours later…
9:11 AM
No idea. I only know that water, whiskey, vodka, hydrant, and Undine all come from the same root.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:54 AM
@RegDwigнt I like the whole Undine concept. Gives peeing in the pool a whole new meaning.
 
 
11 hours later…
9:35 PM
@RegDwigнt Hmm interesting.
> gurgle (v.)

early 15c., medical term for "gurgling heard in the abdomen," a native, echoic formation, or ultimately from Latin gurguliare, perhaps via Dutch, German gurgeln.
It is possible for the Latin root to be onomatopoeic as well.
By the way, vortex is from verto "to turn", cf. version.
Which I don't think is related.
 

« first day (3139 days earlier)      last day (71 days later) »