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12:33 AM
@Mitch Stop making a speculateable spectacle of yourself.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:52 AM
@Robusto htaccess, that most accursed of all files.
 
@alphabet Oh, indeed.
 
@Robusto Install nginx and perform an exorcism.
 
I haven't used that before. Seems like I'm stuck with Apache here.
Hmm, looks pretty nice, though.
 
2:13 AM
@Mitch I'm not sure.
I would probably write: dolor tuus est me videre.
But alternatives may be fine too.
It is also hard to say because I don't really understand what it is supposed to convey, so I can't really say whether this would be idiomatic at all.
 
@Cerberus A college prof told me (us, the class) that word order didn't matter in Latin. Is that true, or is Latin word order related to emphasis?
 
@Robusto Yeah, it matters less than in languages which have little inflexion, like English; but it can still matter, sometimes to convey emphasis or other pragmatic functions, at other times to indicate which words belong together, etc.
In poetry, word order is very loose, but that may be considered a kind of 'game'; in regular prose, it is much less loose.
 
@Cerberus As in English poetry.
 
@Robusto Yes, but far more extremely so.
> Aeneid
verse 1: Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris
verse 2: Italiam, fato profugus, Laviniaque venit
verse 3: litora, ...
> verse 1 = arms and man I sing about, of Troy who first from the shores
verse 2 = to Italy, fleeing fate, and to the Lavinian came
verse 3 = coasts, ...
Now gues which noun "of Troy" belongs to.
And which "Lavinian".
 
2:26 AM
Note: the raccoon, as other news sources point out, was never even tested for rabies. Clearly an excuse invented by the cops to cover up anti-raccoon violence.
 
I wonder where they sleep during winters, raccoons.
They probably only can survive in very warm climates
 
They have fur?
 
> Cheryl Coakley-Rivera of the Hampden County Registry of Deeds told us, “That’s some sick stuff right there for whatever reason. He had an audience and he just wanted to show off like a bully, like a high school bully.”
 
@Robusto By the way, in the video you posted about analytic languages, the first Latin I see while skipping through the video is this:
 
> Coakley-Rivera doesn’t believe the story, as she claims the animal was believed to be blind, not rabid, and would appear around the department regularly to be fed.
 
2:31 AM
Very weird mistake.
I mean, besides the typo in English.
 
> She said, “There was no public safety threat. We had police officers right there, they didn’t perceive it, they didn’t shoot it. In order for someone to do that, run over a harmless helpless, raccoon that’s blind, and he knows its blind, he knows it’s been there before, he knows it’s not a threat, he took it upon himself to run it over and over again.
 
A plural noun with a singular adjective, nobody would ever make this mistake who knew those words in the first place.
 
Apparently there's video confirming that the police statement is a fabrication. Only thanks to a cellphone video from a bystander can we determine that this was a brutal case of stripesist police brutality.
 
2:47 AM
> The Russian government spent about $353.8 billion (32.4 trillion rubles) in 2023, up from a little more than 31 trillion rubles in 2022. But those numbers far outstrip prewar levels of spending. The federal budget in 2021 was only $270 billion (24.8 trillion rubles).
So, $80 billions more per year
The second line of the Yekaterinburg subway, long-awaited but not under construction yet, would have cost $1 billion.
The estimated cost of a Bering Strait tunnel is $70 billion.
We could've had a rail link to the USA.
 
It is saddening.
Worse than a waste of money.
 
3:09 AM
@Cerberus The man?
@CowperKettle With dynamite at both ends.
 
@Robusto Nope, to the shores.
So the placement of Troiae there is quite arbitrary, probably just for the metre.
 
3:24 AM
Yeah, it doesn't really work in English then.
 
@CowperKettle it would be awesome.
 
Not saying English-speaking poets don't rearrange word order to improve scansion, but it's a bit more obvious.
 
@Robusto Yup, Latin has very free word order in poetry.
 
But realistically, there are too many sanctions by the US on Russia to make such a connection financially worthwhile.
 
@Robusto Yes, the lack of inflexion makes it harder to know which word belongs to which, if you don't word order to show that either.
 
3:26 AM
Very free word order in poetry Latin has.
 
@CowperKettle do the existing subway lines in Yekaterinburg converge downtown to an underground mall? So that in winter you can walk around a small part of downtown but underground and warm?
@jlliagre is anything in not Latin goes it.
Etiam capillus habet suam suus umbram unus.
I mean you can totally figure out what goes where but nobody would actually do that.
Except maybe Virgil.
@Cerberus I think there's a lot that is intentionally not being said in the Spanish that more easily converts to Latin but is just not idiomatic in English
So to speculate I think they are saying (preserving as much grammar as is allowed: 'Your disappointment is in watching me (pass you)'
 
@Mitch Quite possibly.
@Mitch I don't quite understand the message in this, though.
 
Or only the sentiment transferred to a mostly common phrase that only connects in spirit: 'Eat.my dust'
 
3:43 AM
Hmm.
 
@Cerberus it is somewhat juvenile. 'everything is a race, and I am going faster than you, and you must take a blow to your self esteem when you see my back because I am passing you'
 
I still seem to lack the cultural baggage to understand what that is about.
It's probably not important...
 
@Cerberus so what is the correct grammar? Domibus nostrīs? Domibus nostribus?
 
@Mitch The former. Possibly the latter in some dialect or archaic Latin or Mediaeval or something.
 
@Cerberus it is totally not important but the grammar question is fun.
 
3:46 AM
Right!
 
Kids these days
 
@Mitch Mi dolor es leerte.
 
@Cerberus shores of Troy, coasts of Lavinia?
@jlliagre snirt
I get that a lot
 
@Mitch Ding!
You can see how disconnected it is.
 
@Mitch There is a connection to a huge mall, probably the largest in the city, from one of the stations
«Гри́нвич» — крупнейший по площади торгово-развлекательный комплекс в Екатеринбурге. Здания расположены в квадрате улиц Радищева, 8 Марта и Куйбышева, с каждой из которых имеется отдельный вход. В 2019 году был построен ряд тоннелей и переходов, соединивших комплекс со станцией метро «Геологическая». Общая торговая площадь составляет 265 тыс. м². == История == В 1972 году на месте будущего торгового центра в доме № 46 по улице 8 Марта открылся первый в городе универсам с самообслуживанием, получивший в начале 1990-х годов название «Мария». К концу 1990-х годов из-за финансовых трудностей владельцы...
 
3:58 AM
@Cerberus it's almost as bad as Finnegans Wake
Almost
 
@CowperKettle Oh, that building looks pretty nice.
The big letters are a bit tacky, though.
@Mitch Scary! Not sure I have ever read anything from it.
 
@Cerberus I get a page in and it's like your brain has done a hundred pushups with someone sitting on your back
 
Good!
 
And you need a French, German and Irish dictionary.
Also you have to have read everything ever written. And memorized it.
And that's just for the acknowledgements.
 
Good.
 
4:08 AM
@Cerberus Some workers from Central Asia died constructing it, but the oligarch owners wheedled out of responsibility
 
Ugh.
 
Still, for a new building, it is much better than what they build here.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:15 AM
Why is the OL&G entry for *broccoli*—/ˈbräk(ə)lē ˌrāp/—pronounced broccoli rape? IDGI…
 
6:52 AM
 
 
2 hours later…
8:55 AM
@Robusto I think it would be more surprising if critics said his grip on power is firm and strong
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at end of answer, potentially bad ns for domain in answer (63): Problem in IELTS Reading‭ by Marita‭ on english.SE
 
9:36 AM
I tried Copilot in phone to generate some images. These are the results.
 
10:04 AM
@Robusto When Lenin and his Bolsheviks took power in 1917, his friend Gorky said that they would hold it for a couple of months at most, and then would lose it
I'm making typos. Lening.
I find the poem bleak, but since Robusto likes it, I'll try out memorizing it. Some poems seem better after memorization
I prefer rhyming poems
 
 
4 hours later…
2:10 PM
@Mitch when you go back that far in history, it depends on how one defines "science."
🧐
 
 
1 hour later…
3:26 PM
India's first astronauts, to be launched this year
 
4:01 PM
@HippoSawrUs It's hideous what they do to broccoli these days.
BTW, it should be pronounced broccoli RAHB.
Rhymes with rob.
@CowperKettle Yes, and it's supposed to be bleak. Winter is bleak.
Me, I think Stevens nailed it.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:34 PM
Can some illuminata/o tell me how to put in angle brackets with a letter inside <s> in an answer text box so that the info does not revert or fail over to the coding (invisible) of a link? Thanks!
 
@Lambie backslashes: \<s> ? Honestly I don't know what you're asking
 
5:53 PM
@Laurel You know Laurel, so often here on SE sites, I have asked questions in META, and not gotten answer because people say the same thing. Yet, I reread myself and think: How could I be clearer?? I will ask this again:
I need to type a letter between angle brackets in a text box in ELL. When I do that, the brackets with the letter between them, vamoose, they disappear. So, if I type: <s>, which works HERE, THERE it disappears from view. Is that clearer?
In all the formatting information I was able to find for SE, they only address basic HTML. So....
 
6:12 PM
@Lambie Try <s> which will format it to code.
That is, backtick before and after. The backtick is under the tilde on your keyboard.
 
6:28 PM
@Jakobian Thank you!
@Robusto Thank you!
 
@Robusto Aha, I tried that USING THE WRONG KEY. Now, I will try it with the one under the tilde. Geesus. I will try it.
 
@M.A.R. Thank you!
@alphabet Thank you!
 
@Robusto It worked fine. THANK YOU!
 
@Lambie You're welcome!
 
6:56 PM
> A software engineer is standing at a bus stop smoking a cigarette. A woman, also waiting for the bus, is annoyed by the cigarette smoke wafting her way. Finally she says, "You know those things will kill you, right? Haven't you read the warnings on the pack?"
The engineer takes another drag and says, "Sorry, lady, but I'm a programmer. We only pay attention to errors."
An oldie but a goodie.
 
@Vikas Harry Potter and the Gulab of Jamun
 
It seems like Copilot / GPT / DALL-E don't allow political inputs. Not good.
 
@Vikas I think you'd be way more upset with all those if the did allow political prompts
@Lambie Just so you know, I still don't know what you're talking about.
Are you saying that under some circumstances <s> disappears when you enter it, and others it shows, and you want to make it show but don't know how?
I would never have guessed the ` mark.
@Robusto It's not that funny because it is true.
Also students don't do something unless they get graded on it.
Also don't gather rolling stones in moss houses.
We'll burn that bridge when we come to it.
 
7:15 PM
A stitch in time saves exsanguination.
 
Speech is silver but we must keep silent about it.
 
All that glitters is not disco outfits.
 
Make hay while the sun is in your eyes.
 
The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy typist.
 
Absence makes the heart contemptible.
 
7:18 PM
Familiarity breeds children.
 
He who laughs last gets the worm.
 
Beauty is in the eye of the lustful.
 
@Lambie Angle brackets are used in HTML code, so <s> makes the post editor think you want to write code. The chat editor doesn't support any HTML code so it doesn't happen here. You have to escape it, using the backslash like I said, or put it in a code span (used for code that shouldn't be interpreted as such) like Robusto said
 
You're never too old to teach an old dog new tricks.
 
Bad taste makes waste.
 
7:22 PM
@Laurel I know that and said that. "so it doesn't revert to coding". Thanks though.
 
Not enough sailors spoil the broth.
 
Wordle 985 5/6

⬛⬛⬛🟨⬛
🟨⬛⬛🟨⬛
⬛⬛🟨⬛⬛
🟨🟨🟨⬛🟩
🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩
 
One must suffer to be in the eye of the beholder.
 
Red eye at morning, sailors have hangovers.
 
Beats a poke in the eye with a sharp pig.
 
7:26 PM
Hey Mitchie, I heard an NPR lady say: pregnant people. Is that the new PC way to say it?
 
You can't have your cake.
@Lambie Yes, I heard similar the other day.
Uterined people?
I had a five minute argument with myself over 'unhoused' as a replacement for 'homeless'.
I discovered that 'ridiculous' is not the debate clincher i thought it was.
Also, why all the hate for freemasonry?
Have you seen what regular services charge for tuckpointing?
haha ... because... haha... well I still don't get it.
 
7:43 PM
Daily Octordle #766
🕛3️⃣
4️⃣🔟
9️⃣6️⃣
🕚8️⃣
Score: 63
 
8:38 PM
@Mitch When everybody gets so worked up over pronouns, and the whole feminist thing (read there plus that), how is it that in the states, everyone wants the masculine? As in actor? Why, if you can feminize and your are a woman/girl, can't you have actress? That has always bugged me...
 
8:58 PM
Fun fact: Korean math teachers refer to capital letters as "large" letters.
 
9:52 PM
@Lambie You'd have to ask the bishop about that.
haha couldn't resist.
@Lambie also it's weird because they're trying to erase gender on the one hand, but uplift it in another (there's still a category for ... female actors separate from the male ones). That seems fair, but big whoop on the word.
Also, I think it is 'woman actor', which again I don't see the problem with 'female'.
Also, it's probably vagina'd person. Does anybody say penis person?
 
@Robusto No, winter can be great
@DannyuNDos Russians also say "large letters", although there is a special term "propisniye bukvy"
> Il faut avoir l'esprit hivernal
Pour regarder le gel et les branches
Des pins croûtés de neige
 
@CowperKettle Sure, it can be great. And there are times when it is bleak. It is the bleakness that the poem captures. Not every poem is about every aspect of everything, nor any painting, novel, or piece of music.
15 hours ago, by CowperKettle
user image
I guess you really like this one, huh?
 
10:09 PM
Oops
 
10:21 PM
Spring started 3 hours and 21 minutes ago
 
@CowperKettle But I think you're missing the point of the poem. It's not that winter can be bleak, but that "The Snow Man" observes the winter scene without thinking of "any misery in the sound of the wind." He is the observer who merely takes it all in, without transforming it into anything previously imagined.
 
Ah!
> A lithotomy set presented to David Wark, lecturer of anatomy & surgery in Glasgow, c.1833-34. The set was a gift from his students who praise the "highly satisfactory manner in which he has discharged his duty towards them".
 
@CowperKettle damning with faint praise?
Or classic understatement?
 
@Mitch It was probably a very cool gift. Extra high-tech
 
@CowperKettle I wonder what much more modest instruments he was using before that
 
10:32 PM
At the bottom of this plaque, if you look carefully, you may see the various "share on social media" buttons.
 
Al-Zahrawi invented a non-invasive instrument for this, in the 10th century, and it was improved by a French surgeon, Jean Civiale, in the early 19th century.
 
@Conrado wow
 
> He found that the new lithotripsy method had had 7 deaths in 307 operations (2.2%), while the old lithotomy method had 1,024 deaths in 5,443 operations (18.8%). For this study, he received in 1836 the Montyon Prize from the Academy.
 
For some reason, I read the Monty Python Prize...
 
@jlliagre same
Our eyes (or brain) are broken in the same way
 
10:37 PM
I guess so.
 
That kind of margin differential is significant enough to deserve prizes (whichever prize it was).
 
~20% for death is not a chance I'd want to take
 
Unless the alternative is 100% chance of death.
 
Yes.but also what about the 80% survivors .. is the recovery full or do they have a lot ... gI problems afterwards?
 
18.8-2.2=16.6%. The extra death rate is precisely equal to the russian roulette first trial "win" odds. Bizarre...
 
10:53 PM
The patients should just point the gun at their abdomen and get the same results
 
11:08 PM
Is English /j/ alveolo-palatal or just palatal?
Judging by how it contrasts with /i/, I'm still under impression that it's alveolo-palatal.
Likewise, I think English /w/ is more labialized than /u/.
 
@DannyuNDos My English /w/ is, but not enough to be fricative to the degree that Spanish /v/ is.
 
I thought Spanish doesn't have /v/?
 
I'm sorry, you're right. It's the /b/ sound
 
El V de vaca.
 
The v letter and the b letters are used to represent it: a bilabial voiced fricative.
And sometimes the w letter, which is not native to the Spanish alphabet, and is only used in imported words.
Our local cementary had a hand-lettered sign for many years: No Votar Basura .
Do not vote garbage.
But it is read identically to No Botar Basura : Do not throw garbage [here].
Excellent advice either way, although it is not clear sometimes whether people read it at all, much less heed it.
 
11:32 PM
@Conrado My mistake, es la uve de vaca.
 
Yes, but coloquially it is still often called la v de vaca , as opposed to la b de burro .
 
Yes, that's what I used to hear.
 
I'd say "bravo" or "victor" in that context tho.
 
@DannyuNDos ¡Gringo! ;-)
 
11:59 PM
A spelling alphabet (also called by various other names) is a set of words used to represent the letters of an alphabet in oral communication, especially over a two-way radio or telephone. The words chosen to represent the letters sound sufficiently different from each other to clearly differentiate them. This avoids any confusion that could easily otherwise result from the names of letters that sound similar, except for some small difference easily missed or easily degraded by the imperfect sound quality of the apparatus. For example, in the Latin alphabet, the letters B, P, and D ("bee", "pee...
 

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