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1:10 AM
Uh, yeah, Faux News. Those are the dangers the masks prevented from harming your children. Not shown: aerosol sneezes containing Covid-19.
 
1:23 AM
 
1:48 AM
> "On dit encore parfois aujourd'hui que quelqu'un "parle comme une vache espagnole", bien que l'expression soit dans son intégralité "parler anglais comme une vache espagnole". Cette expression, un peu passée de mode, a bel et bien eu son heure de gloire. Pour le dire simplement, elle signifie "ne pas être bilingue", "ne pas être à l'aise dans une langue étrangère".
> Pour retracer son origine, il faut remonter au 17ème siècle. À cette époque, la formule existe déjà. Sauf qu'à la place des vaches on dit des "vasces", un mot qui désigne les Basques. Les Basques espagnols parlent en effet mal le français. C'est donc une façon peu élégante de se moquer des montagnards des Pyrénées qui passaient la frontière pour les travaux agricoles saisonniers.
> Une autre hypothèse a également pu expliquer la naissance de l'expression. Il ne serait pas question de vache mais de "basse", un mot qui désigne une servante. On parlait de "bassoteuse" pour parler d'une femme de condition médiocre. La référence à l'Espagne vient accentuer la méchanceté de la formule : on disait "payer à l'espagnole" quand on rouait de coups la personne qui venait réclamer l'argent qu'on lui devait.
> Dans d’autres pays, quand on parle mal le français, on utilise des expressions étonnantes. Ainsi dit-on aux Etats-Unis "to murder French". On assassine le français. Quant à nos amis hollandais, ils poussent la logique encore plus loin en disant "het frans radbraken", comprenez "soumettre le français au supplice de la roue". Effectivement, dans ces conditions il vaut mieux parler un français châtié."
@Cerberus Probably I'm just overtired, but I found the quoted bits just above more amusing than I would have expected.
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at beginning of body (41): Judge my accent and pronunciation by FunnyBunnyModl on english.SE
 
2:49 AM
Word of the day: haw (nictitating membrane)
 
3:19 AM
A firehouse in Germany.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:02 AM
@tchrist Quite amusing.
I had to look up "rouer de coups".
I have not heard "het Frans radbraken" (that should be a capital, which, understandably, the French missed). But it makes perfect sense.
A rather cruel affair.
 
5:16 AM
 
 
1 hour later…
6:16 AM
Yekaterinburg today
The last warm days of this year.
Biden is trying to kill us with contrails, but in vain
Heatmap of my runs since 2018
 
7:02 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at beginning of body (40): Judge my accent and pronunciation by FunnyBunnyModl on english.SE
 
@Mitch Well, its probably fine, but I couldnt find such examples in the Internet and I thought this must be wrong
 
@CowperKettle Do you record this on a device that you take with you? Like a pedometer?
 
7:21 AM
@FaheemMitha Yes, on my mobile phone using the Strava app
Strava is an American internet service for tracking human exercise which incorporates social network features. It is mostly used for cycling and running using GPS data. Strava uses a freemium model with some features only available in the paid subscription plan. The service was founded in 2009 by Mark Gainey and Michael Horvath and is based in San Francisco, California. == Overview == Strava records data for a user's activities which can then be shared with the user's followers or shared publicly. If an activity is shared publicly, Strava automatically groups activities that occur at the same time...
 
@CowperKettle Ah, mobile phone. But how does a mobile phone record temperature? Does it have the sensors?
 
7:58 AM
@FaheemMitha No, it's not temperature, it's the number of runs
A heat map (or heatmap) is a data visualization technique that shows magnitude of a phenomenon as color in two dimensions. The variation in color may be by hue or intensity, giving obvious visual cues to the reader about how the phenomenon is clustered or varies over space. There are two fundamentally different categories of heat maps: the cluster heat map and the spatial heat map. In a cluster heat map, magnitudes are laid out into a matrix of fixed cell size whose rows and columns are discrete phenomena and categories, and the sorting of rows and columns is intentional and somewhat arbitrary...
 
 
1 hour later…
9:19 AM
@CowperKettle My mistake. Sorry.
 
 
1 hour later…
10:42 AM
I remember that in Hindi, "my mistake" is "humari galti"
I know that I've known this from 2004, but I'm not sure I'm correct though.
Five people died in a night ascent on Mount Elbrus e1.ru/text/incidents/2021/09/24/70154591
That's odd, because this mountain is considered comparatively safe.
Of course, ascending it in the fall and in the night is much more hazardous, but still it must be a rare occurrence.
A group of 23 was ascending when a blizzard hit the summit, where they were.
One man slipped and broke a bone in his leg, and instead of hurrying down, some people decided to do some manipulations on him first. The chief guide of the commercial trekking firm said that this cost them valuable time, because the blizzard was reducing atmospheric pressure and making the air more rarefied.
With less oxygen in the air, he said, some of them lost the ability to move and froze to death.
I don't know whether that's correct. People usually ascend this particular mountain without bottled oxygen.
> Mount Elbrus, which rises to 5,642 metres (18,510 feet) just north of the border with Georgia, is infamous for sudden changes in weather and climbing conditions.
 
11:25 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at beginning of body (41): FF VII remake script question by Guitar on english.SE
 
11:40 AM
> Russia on Friday recorded its highest daily coronavirus death toll following a spurt in cases linked to the Delta variant and a lacklustre vaccination drive.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:24 PM
@CowperKettle 1) the work is very important and provides a new technique, combining two known techniques, and I suspect it will have better performance than existing techniques and may make feasible problems that weren't bothered with before.
2) 'learning' and 'deep' and 'understanding' and 'reasoning' are outrageous hype terms - they don't mean what you think they mean.
You know the thing about estimates of time it'll take something to work? You double the number and bump up the units. eg If someone says "It'll take me 3 days to complete", what you can expect is that it'll take 6 weeks.
'constraint reasoning' is not very hyped, it sounds boring and kind of is. It is mostly just specifying a problem with logical statements "((A and B) imply C) and (-B or D) and ..." (these are the 'constraints' and running a logic solver on it (usually just assigning all possibilities of T and F to each variable). This is (obviously?) a very slow process - there are more complicated methods that make it not so bad in practice.
You could set up Sudoku very easily this way (just a set of 'constraints' on each cell.
It's not reasoning like humans do at all.
Even logic, which is all these constraint systems are using, is fairly inhuman.
 
2:38 PM
@Cerberus For me there’s a nebulously allusive/elusive/illusive set of connections in that passage hovering just outside my clear perception linking the flurry of blows you mentioned and being broken upon the excruciator’s wheel of pain, or even Fortune’s. I suppose that’s not completely surprising coming from what John Morley called the “country where youths were broken on the wheel for levity in face of an ecclesiastical procession”.
 
@Mitch Thank you for an explanation!
 
 
1 hour later…
3:47 PM
> A sea-fight must either take place tomorrow or not, but it is not necessary that it should take place tomorrow, neither is it necessary that it should not take place, yet it is necessary that it either should or should not take place tomorrow.
 
4:02 PM
David Foster Wallace (February 21, 1962 – September 12, 2008) was an American author of novels, short stories and essays, and a university professor of English and creative writing. Wallace is widely known for his 1996 novel Infinite Jest, which Time magazine cited as one of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005. His posthumous novel, The Pale King (2011), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2012. The Los Angeles Times's David Ulin called Wallace "one of the most influential and innovative writers of the last twenty years".Wallace grew up in Illinois and attended...
Interesting. Never heard of him.
 
4:31 PM
@CowperKettle -Is- there any good writing nowadays?
But that's one of the few names from the past thirty years that I've heard of (in the US).
I actually have read some of his stuff...some non-fiction about describing his experience on a cruise, and his experience as a ranked tennis player. He really loves to write... long long long stuff. Lots of words. Extra words. Are you finished yet? Maybe a few more words. Why not..have a few more words.
But anyway, he's supposedly a big deal. DFW, Franzen, and that other guy... Dave Eggers. Those are the big three from the 90's.
Who are the popular/important writers there now?
I don't know what is good or popular anymore. Except for Marvel superhero movies. It's like the -only- movies there are are Marvel superhero movies.
One guy has a superpower and saves the universe, another discovers he has a superpower and then his girlfriend breaks up with him. Oops gotta go save another universe. And this guy is a god but you know he can't save everybody. And then there's a fist fight between a magician and a fireball and you don't know who's going to win. And then somebody is impaled on a skyscraper... of their own doing.
 
5:33 PM
@CowperKettle DFW’s “Tense Present” article is a classic. harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/… Some people (Lawler) think he's an elitist. I don’t. I love both Infinite Jest and Pale King. Also one of his New Yorker stories, a Christmas story.
2
 
 
1 hour later…
6:58 PM
@Mitch There are many writers writing today. Probably more than ever before, as the world population continues to break records. And many films made too. But one doesn't hear much about them. I suppose because they don't have a marketing department with lots of money.
 
7:23 PM
Speaking of films, Hollywood is quite strange. I was watching "Jurassic World" and its sequel, which I'd never seen before. They are quite watchable, but it's curious how they switch seamlessly between "oh, the wonder of dinosaurs" and "oh look, more people are being eaten by the dinosaurs", without, apparently, any sense of incongruity.
 
@CowperKettle Link to the first story by DFW I ever read, which I found stunning. If you read it, let me know what you think. newyorker.com/magazine/2009/12/14/all-that-2
 
7:37 PM
Ian McEwan, Atonement, is a fascinating novel.
 
There are lots of books. One could type titles all day and barely scratch the surface.
 
In a way about the nature of writers.
 
As I recall, when I still read the New Yorker somewhat regularly, it has a somewhat idiosyncratic approach to fiction.
@Xanne That story reminds of of when my father told me that Pygmalion stood for "male pig". He presumably knew that wasn't true, and it wasn't a very nice thing to say to an impressionable child.
Having said that, Henry Higgins was indeed something of a pig.
 
8:32 PM
@Xanne I've not read it, but based on the Wikipedia description it sounds like a rather characteristic English novel.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:15 PM
@FaheemMitha sure but you don't want to pick up a random book and be disappointed too often, assuming you care for the genre.
The New Yorker tends to have fiction from well known writers (at least to people who know modern literature)
@FaheemMitha screenwriting is weird. Half the movie that shows up on the screen could turn out to be fight choreography or cruising spaceships (again in a particular genre)
 

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