« first day (3919 days earlier)      last day (46 days later) » 

12:00 AM
But not in a game-changing way.
 
12:12 AM
If we ever hit 1918's pattern of 20-somethings dropping dead, more things will change.
 
I don't think anyone expects that of a Corona virus.
 
@Cerberus Only because we have vastly better medical care today than we did 100 years ago.
 
Uhh I don't think so: I think these Corona viruses just hit old people much harder than younger people?
 
H1N1 is a very different virus from SARS-CoV-2.
In lots of ways. One way is that it mutates much faster.
 
12:28 AM
Back in my grandmother's day the flu was killing 2-3 people a day, in a town of 2-3 thousand people.
 
One theory about 1918 is that older people still had partial immunity from an earlier incarnation of that virus. The age cut-off for unfavorable outcomes was pretty stark.
 
Well, it eventually killed my grandmother, who was in her 20s at the time.
 
Somehow it didn't take anyone of that generation from either side of my family.
 
I've not heard of anyone dying in my family either.
 
Only one of my grandparents lived long enough for me to know them.
 
12:31 AM
Hmm.
 
That's how it was with the generation before me, for various reasons. I knew all mine, quite very well in the case of my mom's side.
 
One died of influenza, one of complications from hernia surgery, one in a mine explosion.
 
Such misfortune.
 
Mom's grandmothers didn't live to see her parents meet even.
 
Only one of my grandfathers died of lung cancer before I was born.
 
12:33 AM
And Dad's grandparents were also gone long before he was born.
 
My father was 42 when I was born.
 
My parents were in their 30s.
 
Oh that's why you don't have great-uncles/aunts.
My folks married at 20, as did theirs.
 
I think my last great-aunt died when I was in my early twenties.
And those were of my mother's side, who was 35 when I was born.
 
I had great aunts who lived to be over 100.
 
12:34 AM
20 is young.
 
My uncle, my father's brother, lived well into his 90s.
 
Good.
 
The great-uncle who lives here still gets around pretty well. Lives on his own, drives. We're trying to get him into a better apartment without stairs. He turns 89 this week.
 
Marrying at 20 in two successive generations!
That gets you young great-uncles.
 
And I was the eldest, as was my mom. Which is why I identify more with the previous generation than all the younger cousins.
But being the eldest child across three generations focuses certain things a bit too intensely.
(eldest of eldest of eldest)
No middle-child syndrome in me, that's for sure.
@Cerberus Yes, which in both cases forced them to drop out of college!!
 
12:38 AM
Yikes.
Did they return later?
 
Mom did, became a high school science teacher. Grandpa didn't.
 
My grandmother dropped out because of the war.
I don't think she returned after the war, my mother was born two years post bellum.
 
Mom's grandpa trained as a WWI fighter pilot. He finished training just as the war ended, which as my great-uncle mentioned today, is probably why I'm around today since the mortality rate was about 70% in that job.
 
How many fighter planes where there even, in WWI?
Were there bombers to fight already?
 
@Cerberus Over 200,000.
Well, aircraft.
 
12:43 AM
Uh, what?
I can hardly believe that!
 
> Over the course of the war the countries involved in the fighting produced more than 200,000 aircraft and even more engines. French industry alone accounted for a third of these.

At the end of the war, the Allied nations were out-producing the Germans by nearly five-to-one in terms of aircraft and over seven-to-one in engines. The UK was producing 31 times more aircraft per month than it had owned at the beginning of the conflict and the RAF was not only the first independent air service, but also the largest.
I rather doubt that the Beeb are making up figures. They were there, after all. :)
Honestly, I was amazed too. We talked about all that today.
World War I was the first major conflict involving the large-scale use of aircraft. Tethered observation balloons had already been employed in several wars, and would be used extensively for artillery spotting. Germany employed Zeppelins for reconnaissance over the North Sea and Baltic and also for strategic bombing raids over Britain and the Eastern Front. Aeroplanes were just coming into military use at the outset of the war. Initially, they were used mostly for reconnaissance. Pilots and engineers learned from experience, leading to the development of many specialized types, including fighters...
 
> During the course of the War, German aircraft losses accounted to 27,637 by all causes, while Entente losses numbered over 88,613 lost (52,640 France & 35,973 Great Britain).
I had no idea they had so many!
@tchrist You did? With whom?
 
@Cerberus My uncle, of course.
Talking about his dad.
 
@tchrist My uncle was a bombardier during WWII. He was lucky to survive.
> The US 8th Air Force, which flew daylight missions over Europe, had a 19% death rate, if you survived being shot down, you had a 17% chance of become a POW. As an aside, RAF Bomber Command, which flew the night missions, had 44.5% death rate and a 8% chance of becoming a POW. The average age of a bomber crew member was just 22 years of age.
 
@tchrist Ah, of course.
A good subject to discuss.
 
12:50 AM
My uncle was too young for WW2. Him they sent to Korea.
 
William Frederick Halsey Jr. (October 30, 1882 – August 16, 1959) was a fleet admiral in the United States Navy during World War II. He is one of four individuals to have attained the rank of fleet admiral of the United States Navy, the others being Ernest King, William Leahy, and Chester W. Nimitz. Born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Halsey graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1904. He served in the Great White Fleet and, during World War I, commanded the destroyer USS Shaw. He took command of the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga in 1935 after completing a course in naval aviation, and was...
A distant relative of mine. My uncle even shares his name.
 
@Robusto I think this is a bit simplistic: a much larger proportion of plastic could be recycled.
 
@Cerberus The point is, nobody's going to put in the effort money to do that.
 
I'm not a huge fan of recycling myself, as it is often used to distract people from stuff that really damages the environment substantially, like cars, planes, industry.
@Robusto Well, laws are becoming stricter and stricter.
 
12:59 AM
Maybe on your side of the pond. We're still beholden to Big Oil over here.
 
Both as to what kinds of plastics are allowed in packaging, and as to compulsory recycling.
The most important thing about plastic is that it should not end up in bodies of water.
@Robusto I'm sure it's slowly changing?
@tchrist Well done.
 
Plastic recycling is mostly a scam.
 
@Cerberus I wish I could share your optimism.
I remember my generation inventing the idea of dedicated recycling 50 years ago. It was unheard of then.
Here's a clip from the show Mad Men, which scene takes place in the early '60s. I would have been around the same age as the kids in that clip. And this scene shows what people thought about "conservation" back then.
Nature was where you dumped your trash.
 
A lot of people still think that way.
Edward Abbey threw beer cans in the desert.
 
Maybe if it was in wild nature.
But, in a park like that, I'm sure there were laws against littering.
 
1:11 AM
What's wild nature?
 
A place that doesn't have mowed lawns?
 
We just call that nature here.
Mowed lawns are unnatural. That isn't nature.
 
We have had laws against certain kinds of littering here since the Middle Ages (probably mostly against excrements...).
@tchrist The video seems to be a in a park with a mowed lawn.
But I am busy cutting corners at the moment.
 
@Cerberus There was grass in a lot of public parks. There is a difference between the "nature" of lakeside picnic sites near heavily populated areas and Nature as she exists where you can't drive a car to see her.
 
I would not expect you to be allowed to litter on mowed lawns.
 
1:24 AM
@Robusto "Where the earth and its community of life are untrammelled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain."
Nederland just passed a law that Nature has a right to exist: dailycamera.com/2021/07/13/…
 
@Cerberus There were TV campaigns in the '60s begging people not to litter.
 
> Leaders of the Colorado mountain town Nederland just gave their surrounding 448-square-mile watershed “fundamental and inalienable rights,” ....
 
1:51 AM
Folks, which is the correct one?

A: I recommend you to read this book.
B: I recommend you read this book.
 
2:03 AM
@WhoSaveMeSaveEntireWorld B.
I recommend [that] you read this book.
 
@Robusto Not bad.
 
2:41 AM
> Four out of five vaccinated people said in the poll that they blame the unvaccinated for the rise in cases. While unvaccinated people did not identify a single group as the main cause, they placed some blame on people traveling to the US (37%), Americans traveling abroad (23%), mainstream media (27%), Biden (21%) and the unvaccinated (10%).
Wow.
This feels so Dunning-Kruger.
Only 10% of the unvaccinated correctly identified the main cause for the rise in cases.
 
> people traveling to the US (37%), Americans traveling abroad (23%)
Perhaps these factors are not negligible.
 
Not a huge whole lot of international travel these days.
But it is also the greater fraternization.
Like all those Fourth of July festivities in Provincetown.
 
Yes, sure.
 
But really, it's mostly the unvaccinated who are driving this.
The idea that the media can cause a rise in cases is...curious.
 
Not to mention sororisation.
@tchrist Perhaps they mean the rise is not real?
But it's bed-time.
For you as well?
 
2:52 AM
Yes, going.
 
I've finished my evening ritual.
The sun will rise soon.
Ajuu!
 
@Robusto Thank you very much!
 
@Cerberus I missed giving my family history.
Both my parents died years before I was born in the Belter wars of the early 2200's. Mars had recently asserted its independence and the colonies, though not as well developed, became restless. My grandparents, who were siblings like my parents, were born right around now. I should give my great-grand parents a call that would be wild.
 
 
3 hours later…
6:21 AM
@Mitch So Belter creole is one of your languages? I have always been curious about the incubation problem and the genetic diversity problem. But hey, you got born, didn’t you?
 
7:21 AM
Haha. Heartland Institute newsweek.com/…
 
@CowperKettle Oil industry propaganda?! Where did I get the impression that Newsweek is reputable I have no idea, but all trust in that source is now destroyed
And what I was recommended after the article, dang
Not opening another Newsweek link anymore.
 
@M.A.R. No, they published both sides of the controversy head to head, there is a pandant paper by a climate activist
*pendant
In art, a pendant is one of two paintings, statues, reliefs or other type of works of art intended as a pair. Typically, pendants are related thematically to each other and are displayed in close proximity. For example, pairs of portraits of married couples are very common, as are symmetrically arranged statues flanking an altar. Pendants may be the work of a single artist or of two artists, who in some instances might be in competition with one another. An example of the latter case is the pairing of the marble groups The Triumph of Faith over Idolatry by Jean-Baptiste Théodon and Religio...
 
Dishonest oil industry goon vs. scientific consensus? That's no two sides.
 
Well, for instance, BBC often tries to invite two sides, even when the second side is unwholesome
 
@CowperKettle Then there shouldn't be a page to link to that only involves the dishonest goon's 'opinion' in isolation
But fine, I'll take Hanlon's razor and shave my stubble with it
That he admits the climate is changing is itself surprising
And his weasel language "we humans may have something to do with it"
But "it's been hotter before" is beaten to death.
 
7:45 AM
> "According to this research, from the first Homo erectus, which is currently dated to 2.1 to1.8 million years ago, until 1965, we have lived in a low-carbon dioxide environment -- concentrations were less than 320 parts per million," said Yige Zhang, a co-author of the research study and an assistant professor in the Department of Oceanography in the College of Geosciences.
I googled. He does not lie, he just omits the fact that CO2 levels were never that high in human history
And this omission is quite easy to spot.
So his arguments will only fool the gullible.
Hanlon's razor is a principle or rule of thumb that states "never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity". Known in several other forms, it is a philosophical razor that suggests a way of eliminating unlikely explanations for human behaviour. It is likely named after Robert J. Hanlon, who submitted the statement to a joke book. Similar statements have been recorded since at least the 18th century. == Origin == Inspired by Occam's razor, Hanlon's razor became known as such in 1990 by the Jargon File, a glossary of computer programmer slang, though the phrase itself had...
Philippe Henri Xavier Antoine de Gaulle (born 28 December 1921) is a French retired admiral and senator. He is the eldest son of General Charles de Gaulle, the first President of the French Fifth Republic, and his wife Yvonne; and is the only one of de Gaulle's three children still living. == Early life == De Gaulle was born in Paris on 28 December 1921 and was baptised on 8 June of the following year in the Church of St. Francis Xavier in the 7th Arrondissement. He was educated at the Collège Stanislas de Paris, where his father had also studied, and subsequently joined the French Navy. De Gaulle...
Wow, De Gaulle's son will turn 100 this winter.
 
8:05 AM
@CowperKettle If I give you peer-reviewed facts, leaving out one crucial piece, and then shaping my narrative so it fits my own agenda, which is diametrically opposed to scientific consensus, then that's obviously lying.
What he leaves out is that hundreds of millions of people live in areas that used to be oceans and seas when the poles had no ice. This is regardless of the hundreds of other projections that predict disease, draughts, and famine.
 
nods
 
Oh, he leaves out some other very important detail too. If you recall, I have said earlier (really, restated what I've read) that what's so disruptive about this man-made climate change is the rate of temperature increase. If the same increase happens over a million years, nothing much would change. Evolution would find a way. Nature would find a way. But this rate is too fast for other living beings to adapt.
 
Yes, the rate is very important. But judging by the comments section, readers clearly see through his fudging.
 
The reefs would die. Everything ranging from planktons to insects would die
 
My glycated hemoglobin result just arrived by mail, at 6.1%
 
8:11 AM
@CowperKettle prediabetic?
 
@M.A.R. probably yes ))
 
Above 6.5% is diabetic IIRC
Is it because of the corticosteroids?
 
I have not been taking corticosteroids. Probably just because I've been eating too much.
Although my handheld glucometer usually shows good results, rarely above 8.0
 
Isn't that too high? I'm too lazy to gloss over my class notes
Really, haven't had the course on diabetics yet
 
Diabetics should keep their blood sugar at no higher than 9.0 two hours after a meal ))
But my TSH just came in at almost zero. I'll decrease my thyroxine from 100 to 75 mcg/day.
And will go to the endocrinologist, because it's odd.
 
8:27 AM
@CowperKettle Oh! FBS? Here we usually report the units in mg/dL
I thought you meant HbA1c
FBS for diabetics is IIRC above 126 fasting and like 200 or something postprandial
 
Yes, in Russia we use this system in which the normal range is from 3.3 to 6.6 )) I mean fasting blood sugar.
I have the setting to switch to the other system on my glucometer, but in Russia everybody uses this system.
 
I would have been surprised if you actually used normal ass units
 
My cholesterol (холестерин) is even higher now.
6.85
XC-ЛПНП is low-density lipoproteins, also too high, 4.60
 
Mine is often high too
I wonder if it's because of D insufficiency or something else
 
But TSH (ТТГ) is really low. I never saw it this low. Maybe I now have hyperthyroidism instead of hypothyroidism.
@M.A.R. I'm taking 20 000 IU of vitamin D per week, very handy, keeps the level in the normal range. ))
 
8:35 AM
I've found the best correlation with exercise is with TG
Rather, best inverse correlation
 
Now I'll need to go to the pharmacy and buy thyroxine in the strength 75 mcg/tablet instead of 100 mcg/tablet which I've been using for several years.
@M.A.R. That's odd that with mine 35 km of jogging/week I still have high cholesterol
The line saying Triglycerides (Триглицериды) though is normal, at only 1.12 [Normal Range 0.4-2.2]
 
But what are your TG levels?
Yeah
 
I am confused. I always think that TG is the same as cholesterol
Too complicated.
 
FBS goes a bit down, but TG is the best indicator whether you've been too sedentary it seems
 
My "Atherogeneity index" (Индекс атерогенности) is normal at 2.94 - whatever that may be
 
8:38 AM
Hunh
 
> The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) is a critical index that can be used as a stand-alone index for cardiac risk estimation (from Google)
It says in Russian that the formula is (Cholesterol - high-density lipoproteins)/Low-density lipoproteins.
 
Sounds like it's a measure of how clogged your arteries probably are?
Oh.
 
Yes, judging by its name.
My creatinine decreased to a normal level though.
105.3
It was higher than the upper limit before. It was 118 a month ago. I even did it twice then to recheck.
And my eosinophils plummeted from 12 to 6, which is now at the upper end of normal.
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at beginning of body, potentially bad keyword in body (41): Please help me understand this article. Thanks in advance by Jaideep Singh on english.SE
 
9:22 AM
@Robusto He was a coalminer?
 
 
1 hour later…
10:39 AM
@Robusto Do you also have my email address in case I disappeared from chat and you miss me?
 
 
2 hours later…
12:12 PM
@CowperKettle What it tells you is not what the article thinks it tells you.
It tells you that there is no existential risk to the human race, obviously.
But some would read it as that we may be cast back to praehistoric life...
(Which I also think is nonsense, but anyway.)
@CowperKettle The only good response is forbidding all passenger travel around the world.
And having everyone working in aerial transportation of goods adhere to very strict quarantining, as in China.
 
12:28 PM
@CowperKettle Yep.
@Gigili I don't have it.
 
@tchrist Hospitalisations have begun to decrease as well here, finally.
 
12:55 PM
@Xanne I'm not some skin job, born in a vat.
But most Belters weren't manufactured. Half of them were born on Earth or Mars, and most of the rest are natural birth. The assembly line for Replicants involves a bit of a genetic lottery to protect against monoculture. Even so, with lo-grav, everyone has heart and bone problems.
Time-travel has became affordable now (by only the plain old rich as opposed to the super-rich), some families send their kids back for education. I got here with a scholarship.
 
1:14 PM
> The team found that COVID-19 patients have significantly elevated levels of a protein called galectin-9 in their blood plasma.
A wealth of data and markers, but only numerous studies will show which ones really pertain to the disease process.
 
1:36 PM
@CowperKettle I read that this morning.
@Cerberus Here we keep having states breaking their previous records on number of covid hospitalizations. Yesterday was Nevada's turn.
 
@tchrist They went up quickly here as well, but then declined.
 
I'm back to the point of again mistrusting all prognostications regarding this virus. I'd almost say that only hindsight is twenty-twenty, but we didn't get it right then either. :)
 
2:06 PM
> Ten-year average PM2.5 exposure predictions based on 2000–2009 data and smoothed to broadly represent pollution differences in the Puget Sound region.
One additional mcg of PM2.5 increases the risk of dementia over a 10-year period by 16% medicalxpress.com/news/…
Are we supposed to know.. hm.
I've no idea
In 2000, I listened to Chumbawamba, the album WYSIWYG
And to a lot of ancient rock music
> Send this song to twenty people
Add your name, don't break the cycle
Pass it along by word of mouse
Save the world, don't leave the house
 
2:29 PM
@tchrist I don't know why: so far, it's been mostly within predictions here.
 
2:46 PM
@Robusto That's sad.
 
 
3 hours later…
5:22 PM
In the runup to the Duma elections, thus far 30 opposition candidates have been barred from running under invented pretexts. twitter.com/novaya_gazeta/status/1422967233781944324
No doubt this number will rise. There's still time before September 19th.
Fugging, formerly called Fucking (German: [ˈfʊkɪŋ] (listen); officially renamed in 2021), is an Austrian village in the municipality of Tarsdorf, located in the Innviertel region of western Upper Austria. The village is 33 km (21 mi) north of Salzburg and 4 km (2.5 mi) east of the Inn river, which forms part of the German border. Despite having a population of only 106 in 2020, the village has drawn attention in the English-speaking world for its former name, which was spelled the same as an inflected form of the vulgar English-language word "fuck". Its road signs were a popular visitor attraction...
> The settlement is believed to have been founded in the 6th century AD by Focko, a Bavarian nobleman. The Austrian region during this century was mostly under the domain of the Kingdom of the Ostrogoths, and was populated by a mix of Christians and Pagans. The existence of the village was documented for the first time in 1070, and historical records show that some 20 years later, the lord was recorded in Latin as Adalpertus de Fucingin.
> the local police chief emphasised that "we will not stand for the Fucking signs being removed. It may be very amusing for you British, but Fucking is simply Fucking to us. What is this big Fucking joke? It is puerile."
 
 
4 hours later…
9:39 PM
@Robusto all my attempts are always slapdash. That's how I roll. Except on Shabbos.
 
9:50 PM
Anyway, I think I'm done with it now. Including export of most of the parts. Viola and cello still left, but that's only ten more minutes like, so I can just do it real quick right before uploading. And I'm in no hurry to upload, MuseScore is basically completely dead in summer.
For now I'm just tired and want to watch YouTube and play Cozy Grove.
(Might still upload before the summer ends, or maybe even the week. Just to get it out of my head and move on. Otherwise you just end up meddling with every individual note in the MIDI for six hours on end every single day. And I've already been doing just that for the last ten days like. Ugh.)
 
 
2 hours later…
11:37 PM
@RegDwigнt Send me a link when you're ready with it.
 
Oh. The Open Media website has been banned and is not only available through VPN or Tor.
Putin's RosKomNadzor sent a warning several hours ago to the website, advising them to "delete illegal information" but providing no clues what they mean exactly.
Haha.
Fails to open. Another "extremist" news website.
Opens just fine in Tor Browser.
The latest news is "A company linked to the daugther of Putin's Press Secretary received millions in state contracts from the Moscow City Office". No wonder the website is considered "extremist" now.
> Former press-secretary of pro-Putin "NASHI" youth organization found to own a villa in Spain worth some 50 million rubles.
It's nice how Putin's propagandists constantly lash out against the West, but in the end are discovered owning luxury apartments and houses in the West.
That's clearly extremism on part of the Open Media website.
People in the comments say it's done to prevent intubation and maintain the patient on independent breathing.
 

« first day (3919 days earlier)      last day (46 days later) »