« first day (3909 days earlier)      last day (55 days later) » 

12:01 AM
My only complaint during breakfast was that the outside area where I was eating breakfast seemed to have already been scheduled as a kindergarten playground for hyperactive chipmunks and rabbits.
 
Rabbits wreck a garden. But a good-sized cat can help.
 
I threatened them with being the main ingredient of a stew but 1) they don't pay attention and 2) I wouldn't do it because when they're not cavorting within sight of either of my half closed eyes, they cavort in the neighborhood of possums, raccoons, and ground hogs. And we all know what they're like.
 
That sounds very bucolic. I used to live in the woods with such creatures, as well as coyotes, bobcats, and the like.
A skink once had a litter in the crawl space under my guest house.
Skunk, that is.
 
@Xanne Both sound cute, if not exactly in the same way
Possums are ugly right?
but their babies are super cute right?
but they look almost identical to the adults right?
How does that work?
 
She took them out walking in the evening, and the followed her in a line.
 
12:10 AM
Nice.
 
A Virginia opossum?
 
Did any dogs notice?
 
With a snout nose?
 
@Xanne THere's more than one kind?
 
There were no dogs around there then. The dogs chase the deer away; the cats take care of mice and moles. And rats.
I miss the foxes.
Mitch, I don’t know how many kinds—I just looked them up in a book of mammals when I saw them.
You must have birds, too. I miss the birds.
From hummingbird to hawk.
 
12:30 AM
@Xanne Oh...that does sound familiar...like they're just called Virginia possums even if they don't just come from there.
@Xanne I suppose. I -hear- them. I would have thought they'd have moved on by now being mid summer. But they're still talking.
I did see a little yellow bird the other day. just zipped through
 
Pathos, bathos, how did that happen?
@Mitch I think I need to set up some attractions for the birds. I haven’t seen anything but a small owl for a while.
Did you know it’s illegal to possess a feather of a wild bird? (federal law) You may pick it up for identification, but not keep it.
 
attractions? like bird food? or a thing to sit on that birds would like?
@Xanne that seems draconian
 
@Mitch Yes, food and water. There are plants but few flowers. They need flowers too.
The law discourages, I assume, killing birds for their feathers.
Many bird feathers are indistinguishable, but I think a set of bald eagle feathers might be collectable.
Or condor feathers.
 
@Robusto Looks like it's all uphill from here. The ensemble projection of the composite model the CDC is working with says this won't peak until October. And we won't get back down to today's level of daily deaths until January.
 
12:46 AM
The possession of feathers and other parts of native North American birds without a permit is prohibited by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). This protects wild birds by preventing their killing by collectors and the commercial trade in their feathers, and extends to all feathers, regardless of how they were obtained. There is no exemption for molted feathers or those taken from road- or window-killed birds. More information on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the list of MBTA-protected species can be found here.
There are exceptions for Native Americans.
 
OK how about chicken feathers?
 
The most likely scenario sees 60,000 cases a day at peak, and 850 deaths. The worst-case scenario they looked at is 240,000 new cases and 4,000 new deaths per day at peak.
@Mitch They don't migrate. Always get hit on the highway.
 
I bet they make 2x4's out of them
 
@Xanne My cats collect bird feathers, in a manner of speaking.
 
@Mitch I think that’s okay—they’re not wild.
 
12:49 AM
> Alcala was sometimes referred to as The Dating Game Killer because of his 1978 appearance on the television show The Dating Game in the midst of his murder spree.
He was arrested as early as 1971, then allowed to go free
 
@Xanne Yeah, only 1024 + 64 + 4 + 1 species are covered.
 
@tchrist I had a cat that collected squirrel tails.
 
cripes
 
@CowperKettle We'll never know how many he killed.
 
But did he call his mother?
 
12:54 AM
She was just showing off. She was a gteat hunter.
 
I just learned that he died, from the news. I never heard of him, since he's not known in Russia.
> During his incarceration between the second and third trials, Alcala wrote and self-published a book, You, the Jury, in which he claimed innocence in the Samsoe case and suggested a different suspect.
 
1:14 AM
One of his diagnoses was “borderline personality disorder.”
 
@tchrist Well, that totally sucks.
And we have the idiots who refuse to get vaccinated to thank for that.
 
1:35 AM
@Robusto It's decidedly grim. A staggering number of people are about to die. Needlessly. It's all from the insane neo-Republican messaging.
 
 
1 hour later…
2:39 AM
> Paronomasia, id est denominatio on Lyden. Þis hiw byð gesett on myslicum andgite, swylce ic þis do to bisne: amans and amens.
 
Word of the day: transvaccinated - a person who has not been vaccinated but self-identifies as vaccinated
> In healthy neonates, ketone bodies supply about 10% of the energy consumed by the brain, a biochemical readiness that protects them against hypoglycemia [[8]].
 
3:17 AM
> Wrap rage, also called package rage, is the common name for heightened levels of anger and frustration resulting from the inability to open packaging, particularly some heat-sealed plastic blister packs and clamshells.
 
3:51 AM
> Results showed that use of statins prior to admission was linked to a greater than 40% reduction in mortality and a greater than 25% reduction in risk of developing a severe outcome.
However, this is an observational study of covid patients, and such studies often turn out to be skewed
 
 
4 hours later…
7:49 AM
> The lawmaker’s wife, Cindy Johansen, who is the corresponding secretary-officer for the Aroostook County Republicans, shared on social media that she is sick with COVID-19.
> Neither Chris Johansen nor his wife have received a coronavirus vaccination.

Cindy Johansen posted to her Facebook on July 16 that she had not been feeling well. “Feeling like I’m going to pass out. Have passed out on garage floor, legs were like rubber,” she said.
 
8:09 AM
Word of the day: covid cave syndrome. Probably moral panic. scientificamerican.com/article/…
 
8:20 AM
Dave Chappelle & …
 
 
2 hours later…
10:55 AM
@CowperKettle what if he was one of the lizard people?
 
Hehe
 
 
2 hours later…
12:46 PM
 
> Emerging into the light after a year locked inside is proving to be a difficult transition for some people.
"Locked inside": where were people really locked inside for a long time?
 
I also doubt that
I ran a total distance of 2040 km in 2020
Woke up early, at 5 am in the summer, and took 15 km jogs.
 
Impressive.
 
1:03 PM
@tchrist The horse-shoe was bent down by closing nightclubs again, forbidding festivals, and closing cafés at midnight.
Even hospitalizations no longer seem to be increasing.
 
@Cerberus Then I bet that's exactly what they consider "being locked inside".
 
Hardly any deaths, because it's mostly young people.
 
By café do you mean bar or restaurant?
 
@tchrist Then that is simply incorrect. People should use words to mean what they mean.
 
They just mean that couldn't do the things they wanted to do.
 
1:06 PM
@tchrist Bar: restaurants werd never the issue, because people sit down, rather than screaming into each other's ears over loud 'music'.
 
And, having no other notion of "going out" than clubbing, consider themselves "locked inside" if they can't go clubbing, not if they can't go outside.
 
They can take walks, shop, visit friends, play sports, etc.
 
@Cerberus That's what I was suspecting. Here a café often shuts down around 1:30pm or 2pm because it was only for breakfast and lunch. It's not a booze place.
 
Right.
 
@Cerberus Visit friends outside from a stone's throw away, perhaps. :)
 
1:09 PM
Whatever local regulations allowed from moment to moment.
 
I think our horse shoe will end up causing many deaths. It's filling up hospitals again.
 
With young people or others?
 
We aren't yet setting massive deaths again, though.
@Cerberus Not completely positive on that, and haven't waded into the Florida data to be sure (especially since Florida deliberately hides demographic data you'd need). But anecdotally there are more young people this time.
 
Ever since May or June last year, we never stopped seeing friends, either in gardens or parks in summer, or inside at home. The maximum group sizes just went up and down.
@tchrist Then let's hope it's the same as here.
 
"Inside at home" was the source of much spread. They proved that with the birthday-party data.
 
1:13 PM
Yes, but some things are worth the risk.
No real parties, just a quiet dinner with 1 (December) or a varying number of friends.
 
Christmas.
 
At Christmas, boyfriend and I visited my parents.
And his parents visited us.
No larger groups.
And we were as careful as we could.
No more than two households together.
But my parents continued to babysit my nieces and my friend's children.
 
Children bring things home.
 
Indeed.
And they babysit my nieces at my brother's house in The Hague. They also stay the night.
We've had one or two scares there, when people at their day care caught the disease.
 
That's scary.
 
1:20 PM
And the parents of the other children they babysit got infected themselves.
 
My step-grandmother was recovering from some injury in a nursing home for a while before moving back to her own house, and there were cases there that scared us a lot.
 
It must be difficult to contain in such a place.
 
@Cerberus Dodged the bullet.
 
Yes.
At Christmas, my mother was coughing.
"Oh, don't worry, I have that all the time, little viruses from the grandchildren."
So comforting.
Oh, and she never got tested, because surely it was just a cold.
 
My mother had to forbid visits from the ever-sick grandchildren for a while.
 
1:23 PM
Wise.
Although each man must decide for herself what risks to take.
 
I banned my mom from going to stores in April 2020. She managed to dodge the ban a dozen times in early 2021.
 
To my parents, seeing the children was more important than their health. They only stopped babysitting for a short while early in the epidemic.
 
> Researchers examined the medical records of more than seven million people in Denmark, and found that the number of schizophrenia cases that may be attributable to cannabis addiction has increased three- to four-fold in the past 25 years.
 
@CowperKettle That's still a good score. I tried that with my parents, but it never caught on.
 
@Cerberus I thought that in Europe, everybody switched to delivery services.
 
1:26 PM
@CowperKettle But it's still a low number, I hope?
 
@Cerberus I hope so too
Besides, one cannot believe in a single study.
 
@CowperKettle A few people did, but there nowhere was near the required capacity.
 
It's a good rule of thumb to read meta-analyses and reviews to really be certain. Because professionals may sport shortcomings in studies.
 
Indeed.
 
I found our local delivery service wonderful. They lug huge bags with food, very quickly to your door. They will ring you up and tell "you know the milk is a bit old, shall I pick a different brand that's more fresh?" and so on.
The website is very handy.
It allows you to see your previous orders, so you have to just "copy and paste" or simply press the button to repeat an order.
Russian programmers are very good, while they are not busy hacking for the Kremlin.
 
1:39 PM
That's nice.
Everyone knows Russia has good education.
 
Here, a ten-year-old has just died of the plague again.
I say "again" but it was not the same child this time as last time. :)
 
Oh, not.
Any pre-existing health issues?
Anyone can be unlucky.
 
I think you may have misread me as speaking figuratively.
 
I'm getting my second shot tomorrow.
 
I'm referring to a death caused by Yersinia pestis.
 
1:45 PM
@tchrist Why? I simply replied ironically.
Oh, that plague.
 
There are others?
 
There is a certain viral plague I've heard some people mention.
 
Plague is bacterial.
Except that gay one.
 
The word plague in its less literal sense can be many things, even insects, cannitnot?
 
> (REMOTE, July 22, 2021): Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, in cooperation with local public health agencies, is investigating plague (Yersinia pestis) activity. Currently, there have been laboratory confirmed reports of plague in animals and fleas from six counties. This includes LaPlata County, where a 10-year-old resident died from causes associated with plague. Laboratory testing has since confirmed the presence of plague in a sample of fleas collected in the county.
 
1:49 PM
Gay one? Aids?
 
As once it was known.
 
There's a new television drama series about aids in the eighties.
Quite harrowing.
I wonder what the official length of a cat is.
 
To put it mildly.
 
The one next to me seems inordinately long.
 
> The researchers here looked at people who were infants or very small children in 1930 and determined the acidity of the water supply in the neighborhoods where they grew up. This correlates with the amount of lead in their drinking water. When they also looked at the selective service records for each individual, which included IQ tests, they found that 20 percent of the variation in intelligence tests in 1945 could be linked to lead levels in the water supply from when they were children.
 
1:52 PM
Those were probably high levels of lead?
 
Yes, probably due to the use of lead in motor fuel
 
@Cerberus There isn't one: cats don't have to measure up. I believe Lorin is 24" and Randy 26".
 
But, yeah, I think some effect on the development of the brains of young children has been proven.
 
@Cerberus Me too.
 
Recently a study came out that suggests that Toxoplasma gondii, present in about 15% of US citizens, may decrease cognitive abilities
 
1:54 PM
We still have soms leaden pipes here which cause levels above European norms.
 
Pop-sci articles say that up to 50% of France is infected with Toxoplasma gondii, but who knows.
 
Is that what causes toxoplasmosis?
 
Yes
It can last for years as an asymptomatic low-grade infection
 
I thought it was usually not a big deal...
 
Cats again.
 
1:56 PM
Even cats aren't prefect.
3
 
I understand that it's especially pernicious amongst the immunosuppressed.
Hm, don't see cannabis mentioned there.
Not saying it's impossible, but you need good data.
Can't say I've ever known anyone with schizophrenia.
 
2:39 PM
My uncle had schizophrenia. At least that was the official diagnosis. Who knows. He was paranoid when not on drugs.
When he fell ill with cancer, he had to withdaw his antipsychotic.
 
Not fun.
 
And he looked and spoke in a different fashion. He came alive when off the antipsychotic.
But, at the same time, he started suspecting his woman of scheming something.
Antipsychotics really dull one's mind and will.
 
I believe there is evidence that cannabis can trigger schizofrene in certain susceptible people. And psychosis (I know someone). But probably only if you use it a lot.
 
And he spoke, in 2003 that Putin's invasion of Chechnya is a crime. Unlike the majority of Russians, who did not care when we bombed the city of Grozny into ruins.
A person can have delusions and yet be intelligent and sensitive in many areas.
 
I wonder how one can remove these inset ads
They block quite the view quite a bit
 
3:34 PM
@CowperKettle True.
@CowperKettle Use Ublock Origin.
2
@CowperKettle Yeah it's pretty evil propaganda.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:10 PM
In Russian, apocalypse is apokalipsis, with the stress on the second "a"
> from Ancient Greek ἀποκάλυψις (apokálupsis, “revelation”)
It's odd that in English the final sis vanished
 
Apok ellipsis
Nah it's still therr
 
I've heard that someone asked a biologist about mosquitos, like what would happen if they were eradicated like if they supported a bat or bird ecosystem. They said nah it wouldn't make much difference to the world if they just disappeared
I mean the mosquitos would notice, but that's about all
 
5:35 PM
> “Come on, Grandma, tell us about the time you kissed Hitler.” She went right on telling the tale until her death in 1985 at age 92.
> In many ways, George and Carla De Vries were typical American tourists vacationing in Europe. The Norwalk, California dairy farmers did what many of their countrymen did that year and seized on the upcoming Summer Olympic Games as the perfect opportunity to see the Continent.
Adriaen de Vries (c.1556–1626) was a Northern Mannerist sculptor born in the Netherlands but working in Central Europe, whose international style crossed the threshold to the Baroque; he excelled in refined modelling and bronze casting and in the manipulation of patina and became the most famous European sculptor of his generation. He also excelled in draughtsmanship. Partly as a result of the disturbances of the Thirty Years' War, and also changes in style, Adriaen de Vries had no direct follower. == Life == Born in The Hague to a patrician family, his early training is obscure; a recent...
 
6:02 PM
 
 
2 hours later…
7:59 PM
@Mitch That's not so bad!
 
8:43 PM
@Mitch That is possibly the least scientific observation I've ever seen. I mean, " ... someone asked a biologist about mosquitos [sic], like what would happen if they were eradicated ..."
I'm no fan of mosquitoes, but I've seen flocks of purple martins feasting on them at dusk. I'm sure if you asked them they'd say, "Hey, don't fuck with my dinner, asshole."
 
8:58 PM
See?
 
9:14 PM
They have eradicated mosquitos locally in Africa.
I don't think there was a huge effect on the local ecosystem.
 
Maybe we should have farms for growing mosquitos as a viable third world protein source
 
Will that be next to the tick farm and the wasp farm?
 
Hm...ticks...ok
But wasps? That doesn't seem right
 
9:31 PM
Supposedly half the human deaths in history have been on account of mosquitoes.
That's, like, 95 billion deaths? I don't remember the figure they gave.
 
@Mitch Why not?
@Robusto I find that a bit hard to believe...
 
@Cerberus So did I.
So a better number for total cumulative human population on Earth is 108 billion: worldatlas.com/feature/…
> So, even if all of the world's population in 1900 contracted malaria, the death toll would have come to perhaps 100 million. That's a lot of people, but it would have taken 540 more "1900s" to get to 54 billion deaths, an almost statistically impossible prospect.
 
Yeah, and what about all those other causes of death, like a heart attack or violence or infant death syndrome or whatever.
Malnutrition.
 
You left out war.
 
One could place war under violence.
 
9:41 PM
@Cerberus I don't feel like they'd breed well. Like not at industrial scale.
 
But I think so-called natural deaths should be the large majority.
@Mitch Why not?
You just need lots of volunteers.
 
@Cerberus I think not all violence is war. War is its own thing.
 
@Cerberus if you're going to do wasps, why not do bumblebees? Those guys are chonky.
@Cerberus wait...volunteers for what?
 
Volunteers are needed to milk the wasps.
 
Little tiny udders?
 
9:51 PM
I think the correct term is stinger.
 
@Mitch To feed the ticks.
@Mitch I think bumblebees aren't a threatened species qua reputation.
 
Honeybees are definitely threatened.
Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is an abnormal phenomenon that occurs when the majority of worker bees in a honey bee colony disappear, leaving behind a queen, plenty of food, and a few nurse bees to care for the remaining immature bees. While such disappearances have occurred sporadically throughout the history of apiculture, and have been known by various names (including disappearing disease, spring dwindle, May disease, autumn collapse, and fall dwindle disease), the syndrome was renamed colony collapse disorder in late 2006 in conjunction with a drastic rise in reports of disappearances of...
 
@Cerberus I feel woozy
Like that scene in Aliens where the humans were wrapped up in cocoons for feeding of the baby aliens
@Cerberus or threatening
They're like the cows of the insect world
 
Exactly.
@Robusto Perhaps, but not qua reputation.
@Mitch I wonder how many ticks you could put on a human.
An acquaintance once had 20+ on his scrotum.
Had to go to hospital to get them removed.
 
@Cerberus STOP
 
10:06 PM
I didn't do it.
It was mother nature.
 
STOP IT
When I was a kid, we had dogs in the neighborhood that got some ticks. In their ears. A lot of ticks. A lot of growing ticks. I don't want to say a hundred. But it was a lot.
It was gross
Nightmarish
Yuck
Yes they took them to the vet to get them removed
I think
 
Very gross.
 
shudders
It looked really gross
Not just intellectually like 'thats kind of a lot to deal with'
But more like 'insides of a lobster' gross
 
Yeah I can imagine.
Ticks are amongst the grossest animals.
 
Like dead body floating on the water gross
Like somebody else's vomit gross
Because you know it's not like your own vomit is great but it's just not as bad as someone else's
 
10:18 PM
Thanks for the comparisons.
 
10:40 PM
@Cerberus no problem
 
11:09 PM
@Robusto You only need a parataxis when there are too many of you to fit into just one.
 
11:37 PM
@tchrist rimshot
 
11:51 PM
@Cerberus What, Mother Nature made your friend an idiot?
One tick on your scrotum is chance. Two is carelessness. But twenty is deliberate action on your friend's part.
 

« first day (3909 days earlier)      last day (55 days later) »