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1:32 AM
@Cerberus What? I barely know her!
 
But you do know her?
 
but, since you'e about to ask, yes, sneezing fit over.
 
Hmm.
 
mmhmm.
 
Vaccinated yet?
 
1:42 AM
had my 2nd one...only a few more days and I'll have my superpowers
how about you?
 
That's good.
It will probably be a month or so before it's my cohort's turn.
They're around 1965 now.
 
2:12 AM
@Cerberus stratified (mostly) by age? is it that graduated that you still have to wait? Here it was at first >85, then after a month or so >75 and then at some point they just said "OK anybody under 60".
 
The Safeway here is giving free shots plus $20 off on groceries.
 
@Xanne For real? I'd get $20 worth of Flamin Hot Cheetos
 
2:32 AM
Yes, for real. And lots of takers. Other stores with pharmacies are also doing it, e.g.Walmart. Cerberus will get on the vaccine nationalism horse again, though, so best not to tell him.
 
2:47 AM
@Mitch Yes, the invitations are sent by year of birth (with some groups that get their letters earlier, like nurses and those with certain afflictions).
@Xanne The WHO is begging rich countries to allow vaccines to cross their borders to poor countries rather than vaccinating children.
 
@Cerberus The US is going to send stuff. Biden announced it a couple of days ago.
 
Good.
But I am curious about your term "vaccine nationalism".
Is closing one's borders to vaccine exports not vaccine nationalism?
@Xanne By the way, I hope Biden will be able to teach Europe a lesson on two different kinds of 'nationalism' (protectionism, rather): patents, and tax evasion.
It seems the American government has made a U turn.
But some European governments are still resisting those super necessary reforms.
Brussels has wanted those reforms for ages, but some evil countries are behaving badly.
I think my country is near the top of evil with respect to tax evasion.
 
@Cerberus wait...what reforms?
 
Companies should pay taxes where they sell their stuff, is the big one.
They should not be allowed to sell €1 billion in products in France but pay taxes on that amount on the Cayman Islands, where the tax rate happens to be next to nothing.
Another one is suspending patents on the production of very important medicines and vaccines for poor countries.
 
3:03 AM
@Cerberus Unfortunately some democracies/cultures allow extreme candidates to filter all the way up to the top, but luckily the president isn't -everything-. So the U-turn was really just an eccentric 4 year blip of incompetency. The U-turn was really a zig-zag. The recovery will be slow though even though nominal competency in foreign affairs has been restored.
 
I do not remember ever reading about an American government wanting to suspend patents. But I may have missed that.
 
@Cerberus agreed. public health should be a public good that is provided by the government as long as it is within their means (and all this covid vaccination stuff is relatively very cheap).
 
As to tax reforms, yes, I think certain governments were better.
 
@Cerberus I thought I heard of the possibility recently Moderna?) but I could be making stuff up.
 
@Mitch Yes. I would ever prefer it if they suspended those patents and gave a few billion in compensation to big pharma.
@Mitch Yes, that is what I meant by how Biden is teaching Europe a lesson. But in my later line I was referring to governments before him.
 
3:06 AM
pharma is making so much money they don't really need it. but yeah, give em a handout
 
Yes, they do not need it.
But anything is better than artificial scarcity of essential medicines and vaccines.
 
@Cerberus I thought European governments had pledged to send vaccines outside of Europe?
 
Yes, so this is not about that, but about suspending patents.
14 mins ago, by Cerberus
@Xanne By the way, I hope Biden will be able to teach Europe a lesson on two different kinds of 'nationalism' (protectionism, rather): patents, and tax evasion.
 
 
1 hour later…
4:09 AM
 
4:45 AM
Yesterday afternoon I wanted to take a nap. I woke up an hour ago, in the morning.
I was confused about the date and the time for a half hour. I'm still not sure.
@Mitch Yeah cheating sounds right! But, by the rules, if we're only concerned with the stress pattern, devil and evil should rhyme, right?
 
@Færd You must have been deprived of much sleep before?
 
Yes I've been sleeping very irregularly in the recent past.
 
Hmm.
How do you feel now?
 
I have a headache. And I don't feel refreshed. But nothing terrible.
There are great words and expressions for feeling lost in English. I'm trying to remember them.
Disoriented is all that comes to my mind rihgt now.
 
5:01 AM
@Færd A headache was to be expected, after sleeping for such a long time.
Especially with a single head like that.
@Færd Nonplussed?
 
Yeah and I didn't have dinner either.
 
Then eat something.
 
@Cerberus I think there's soemthing along the lines of "thrown off the compass".
Having breakfast as I write right now.
 
Good.
 
Maybe I'm imagining things. It'll come to me later if there's any basis to it.
 
5:04 AM
I don't know.
But I should have been in bed hours ago.
 
I should think so. I was surprised to see you still awake.
 
Someone please suggest me the most beautiful poem (or a part of any other long work) that you think is, by Lord Byron or PB Shelley. Beautiful, aesthetic.
 
I'm a bad dog.
Hello there.
 
Hi :)
 
I can't help you at the moment.
 
5:06 AM
@Cerberus Oh no. You're the best dog around here.
 
Right, just because there aren't any others.
 
Well, that doesn't make it untrue.
 
@Cerberus I can see it as a quite optimistic statement bcoz of the word “at the moment”.
 
I'm always the optimist.
Now I must go to bed, valete!
 
Sweet dreams, doggy!
 
5:09 AM
Have a good sleep!
 
Merci.
 
5:59 AM
"performs well on standard tests" or "performs well in standard tests"
 
6:30 AM
"pysiological conditions are different from industrial or laboratory conditions."

"or" or "and"? What rule governs the usage here?
 
 
1 hour later…
7:33 AM
I think “and” is what you mean. Maybe “between” or “among” instead of “from.”
@CowperKettle So Covid provisions knocked out the flu, didn’t it? Or wrongly diagnosed.
 
8:10 AM
@Xanne Yes, or wrongly diagnosed. Good point.
I did not think of that.
> And yet I did not think of that
Till after she was gone—
I knew her by the broad white hat,
All ruffled, she had on.
 
School children and adults had to stay at home which would considerably limit the spread of common flu.
Perhaps governments should have used the opportunity to wipe out other common diseases during the lockdowns.
 
Maybe it's bad to wipe out flu. It will still survive in some pockets of population, and all the while the rest of the population will grow naive to it. When the conditions for spread return, the flu might hit the whole population much harder due to diminished immunity.
That's my guess, I'm not an epidemiologist
 
@CowperKettle I think we've tried but repeatedly failed to wipe out flu.
And something zoonotic like the flu will keep mutating in ducks and pigs, if not in humans
 
There are also studies that partly blame low exposure to allergens/pathogens during childhood (and probably adulthood) for high occurrence of allergies in developed nations compared to developing nations.
There have been similar studies for autoimmune disorders too.
 
8:45 AM
"robust towards overfitting" or "robust to overfitting"
 
9:37 AM
Memorizing words in the park
 
10:03 AM
@CowperKettle Kinda a long word, but at least it's not that made up Icelandic word
 
@CowperKettle That’s mobile phone set! Oh my goodness, it reminds me of circa 2010.
Samsung Duos. I know it may be inappropriate to ask if it is yours but really that era was awesome when Samsung came up with a dual sim feature in a phone, I had that phone set and I remember it’s battery used to get dead very quickly (within 10-12 hours).
 
10:20 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in answer, potentially bad asn for hostname in answer, potentially bad keyword in username (89): Which is the preposition to go with “best”? Is it “best at”? by health care bangalore karnatak on english.SE
 
 
1 hour later…
11:22 AM
@ConGovDeIn Yes it's mine. I used my ancient iPhone 5s to take the picture a couple hours ago
I use the Samsung mainly for memorizing words, and iPhone for photos and Strava
Weird mural on a wall I snapped today
> "The happiness of being together"
 
11:45 AM
Word of the day: dammit doll
> Actually, decades of experimental research have found exactly the opposite: when people vent their feelings aggressively, they often feel worse, pump up their blood pressure, and make themselves even angrier.
 
12:07 PM
@CowperKettle Wow! iPhone 5s ummm... that means 2013, eh? But it doesn’t support VOLTE network, does it?
And if I’m not wrong then that Samsung Duos takes the full-size SIM card not the nano or micro one, right?
Old things are best, we shouldn’t change them until we are totally compelled to do so. (It’s not an argument, it’s just something I believe).
 
12:25 PM
@Færd If we're only concerned with stress, then yes devil and evil have the same stress pattern. But by that logic, horses and peanut and butter and hidden are rhymes too.
I'm no poetician, but if the last syllable is the same that's most of the way to a good rhyme (and may be a good rhyme. but for me an AmE speaker, the first syllables of evil and devil do not match.
@CowperKettle wait...so you have two phones with you all the time?
 
@Mitch Yes, they do not weigh much
> Golf was becoming increasingly popular in Scotland until James II of Scotland banned the game in 1457 because he felt that young men were playing too much golf instead of practising their archery.
 
@CowperKettle I think the yearly flu shows, like @M.A.R. said, that the flu mutates every year so exposure one year doesn't help strengthen your immune system for the version that spreads the next year. So we need a flu shot every year (for a new different flu)
 
@ConGovDeIn It probably doesn't, but I never heard about the VOLTE before
@Mitch Ah, I see!
 
@Mitch but since the last syllables do, is it not a rhyme?
 
@MattE.Эллен I suppose I could grudgingly concede that.
But I'm not going to like it
 
12:35 PM
that's fair. I won't force you to like it
 
To be clear, I haven't actually gone through the motions of conceding
 
there's a lot of paper work involved, I imagine
 
And pride
 
ah, that's a sticking point
 
The things I -want- to do don't get done for much less.
 
12:39 PM
I don't know why it took me several tries to read that
 
The Anglophone Problem, as it is commonly referred to in Cameroon, is a socio-political issue rooted in Cameroon's colonial legacies from the Germans, British, and the French. The issue classically and principally opposes many Cameroonians from the Northwest and Southwest regions, many of whom consider themselves Anglophones, to the Cameroonian government. This is based on the fact that these two regions (formally British Southern Cameroons) were controlled by Britain as a mandated and trust territory of the League of Nations and the United Nations respectively. == Background == While ma...
An English-French war in Africa, by Africans
 
@MattE.Эллен It's my accent
 
1:15 PM
such twang, very up talk
 
1:39 PM
@MattE.Эллен No. That is not how it works. It has to be the same starting with the stressed syllable after its optional leading consonant cluster plus any unstressed syllables following that.
So evil and weevil rhyme with each other but not with devil or revel.
Nor with reveal.
Shimmering doesn't rhyme with earring or ring, but it does with glimmering.
If the stressed syllable is at the very end, then your statement is true. Otherwise it is false.
 
Ah, ok. I see. it's a lot more complicated than I thought
 
So it only counts for masculine rhymes. Feminine rhymes don't work that way.
Smack and attack are masculine rhymes.
They have no unstressed syllables following the stressed one.
Listen and glisten are feminine rhymes, as are often and soften.
But listen does not rhyme with men.
XML-ed and emerald might have assonant rhymes for some speakers and pronunciations.
Syllable doesn't rhyme with kill a bull unless you used forced pronunciation. :)
Sing to me and bring to thee are fancy rhymes. :)
I don't know what to call them though. More assonant, I guess.
Assonant rhymes are worried only about the vowels not the consonants.
Like in terza rima from Dante.
> Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura
ché la diritta via era smarrita.

Ahi quanto a dir qual era è cosa dura
esta selva selvaggia e aspra e forte
che nel pensier rinova la paura!

Tant'è amara che poco è più morte;
ma per trattar del ben ch'i' vi trovai,
dirò de l'altre cose ch'i' v'ho scorte.
 
speaking of assonant
 
vita/smarrita, oscura/dura, forte/morte, paura/trovai!?
@MattE.Эллен Myrmioviraptorettes?
 
1:55 PM
@tchrist I couldn't say
 
You shouldn't show that in a family channel: they're formicating you know. :)
 
bad keming not my fault
 
2:36 PM
that seems suspect. I'll wait until I'm home to watch it :p
 
3:04 PM
@tchrist Now here's a definitive answer. Take that Edgar!
@Mitch Yeah I took the last syllable condition as unworthy of mention for obvi-ness. Your instinct was spot-on btw!
 
 
2 hours later…
5:10 PM
 
5:55 PM
La rue des Degrés est une rue située dans le quartier de Bonne-Nouvelle du 2e arrondissement de Paris, en France. == Situation et accès == Elle est intégralement constituée d'un escalier qui part de la rue de Cléry pour remonter vers la rue Beauregard à quelques mètres de la porte Saint-Denis. Avec seulement 5,75 m de long, la rue des Degrés est la plus courte de Paris; elle est large de 3,30 mètres. Les stations les plus proches sont : Bonne-Nouvelle (lignes  ) Strasbourg - Saint-Denis (lignes   ) == Origine du nom == Elle porte ce nom car c'est une voie en escalier. == Historique =...
The world's shortest street
from 3 to 5 meters, depending on the method of counting
 
6:18 PM
Ebenezer Place, in Wick, Caithness, Scotland, is credited by the Guinness Book of Records as being the world's shortest street at 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in). The street has only one address: the entrance to No. 1 Bistro, which is part of Mackays Hotel. The hotel has other frontages onto Union Street and River Street, with its main entrance on Union Street. Ebenezer Place originated in 1883, when 1 Ebenezer Place was constructed; the owner of the building was instructed to display a name on the shortest side of the hotel. It was officially declared a street in 1887.Ebenezer Place was only recognised by...
 
6:34 PM
> male honeybees are hemizygous as they develop from unfertilized eggs (unlike female honeybees that develop from fertilized eggs and thus have two sets of genes).
Mitochondrial biogenesis is the process by which cells increase mitochondrial mass. It was first described by John Holloszy in the 1960s, when it was discovered that physical endurance training induced higher mitochondrial content levels, leading to greater glucose uptake by muscles. Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by numerous different signals during times of cellular stress or in response to environmental stimuli, such as aerobic exercise. == Background == The ability for a mitochondrion to self-replicate is rooted in its evolutionary history. It is commonly thought that mitochond...
 
6:59 PM
@Mitch Actually whether having had flu protects later is not settled. The 1918 flu is thought to have hit old folks less hard than young because of 1879 flu. As I recall small pox is the only disease wiped out world-wide.
Thr review article on seasonality of flu finds that none of the typical explanations explain events very well, or they fail to explain big chunks of experience.
It’s hard to figure out whether light cases (of flu or Covid) improve immune response to later viral loads. But a two-shot routine suggests yes for Covid, doesn’t it? So are lockdowns, to the extent they keep many people “naïve,” really sensible?
 
7:18 PM
What are you proposing? That the virus should have been allowed to spread without restraint, in order to reach herd immunity faster?
 
The immune machinery scares me, it's so complex. I dare not make any conclusions.
So many different molecules, cells, signals etc.
 
I am not proposing. i am questioning what we know supports policies that have been followed.
questioning whether, that is
If having had the common cold, specifically one caused by a Coronavirus, protects against Covid-19, this would be good to know. I myself don’t know if this is discoverable, or whether it would help explain the age distribution of serious cases.
 
Study: Flies with schizophrenia-associated genes respond well to anti-psychotics - well, I bet it's hard to poll flies' opinion on this. Maybe they felt worse on antipsychotics. Who knows. We cannot know their subjective feelings.
 
Then what does that have to do with whether or not lockdowns are sensible?
 
8:10 PM
@Færd The e in devil is not a schwa; it's simply a short e, as in bed. There's nothing wrong with rhyming evil/devil, for a couple of reasons. Mainly, it's a feminine rhyme (one with two syllables of which the final syllable is unstressed), but it's also a "sight rhyme," and as most poetry is read, not performed, the eye, not the ear, completes the similarity. On top of that, it just works.
 
8:23 PM
There's also nothing wrong with slant rhymes. Emily Dickinson, for one, used them extensively. Example:
The Mind is Smooth – no Motion –
Contented as the *Eye*
Upon the Forehead of a bust –
That knows – it cannot *see*
 
 
1 hour later…
9:27 PM
@Robusto Yes, not a schwa. That was a mistake. Thank you.
As for it being a sight rhyme, it's interesting that it sounded conspicuous to me exactly because I was listening to the poem the first time I 'read' it. And this line was repeated a few or several times. It jerked me back from my trance to the surface and form of the poem. It did sound uncomfortable to the ear.
 
9:53 PM
@Xanne I don't understand the mechanism of the mRNA version well at all, but yes, a weakened virus vaccinations leads me to believe that some kind of exposure is good.
But I'm not sure how to balance that with something like do we wash hands or not? That is, do we wash hands to prevent exposure, or do we -not- wash hands i order to get light exposure? I feel like I should keep washing my hands. I don't know.
 
From what I have read, fomite infections are thought to be very rare?
 
10:11 PM
One policy approach is to tell people the truth, tell them the techniques that protect more or less, and leave it to them. Try to protect the elderly in nursing homes etc. Recognize that lockdowns themselves do damage in many ways, with respect to health, education, economy, social development. To lock down because you have too few hospital beds is really awful, a failure.
 
A failure of what?
The capacity required for an uncontrolled epidemic is completely unattainable.
We'd have needed ten times as many nurses as we have now, I think.
And we already have a severe shortage of nurses.
 
10:46 PM
@Cerberus I've read the same.
 
Greetings.
 
Hi. Just waking up for halfday 2 of 2.
 
Since when do you live by halfday?
 
I get up at 4am these days because of the season. Sometimes I have to just pass out for a sudden nap midafternoon. This one of those days.
 
Oh, I see.
Does that work well?
 
10:48 PM
None of this is deliberate.
But yes, I feel refreshed now.
 
Do you wake up early even with very dark curtains?
 
Drinking coffee and having toast.
@Cerberus Not quite so, but the problem is that I wake up to pee at 4 or whatever and see rosy-fingered Aurora clawing her way up out of Nyx, and cannot re-retire. That or that cats are eager to frolic.
Can you halve toast? No, waste of a good slice of bread.
 
Hmm.
A bed-pan, then.
Or good curtains in the loo.
 
I have this immense eastward facing window in the bathroom off the master bedroom. I cannot pee but regard her fingers.
 
Shade it?
 
10:57 PM
I did go back to bed, and hid in the darkness, but my mind would not quiet.
 
Unfortunate.
Have you been vaccinated yet?
 
It was just yesterday six weeks agone.
 
Oh, good.
And all of your friends and family as well?
 
But for the least among us.
 
Who do not need it, do they?
 
11:00 PM
The little people also take ill of this. There are tragedies. But not so many as the agèd.
 
Once the rate pales in comparison with other causes of illness, it could be said to cease to matter.
 
Does this strike you as imprudent, or is it merely the journalism that lends it that taint? Colorado has the worst coronavirus case rate in the country as it ends most statewide restrictions
 
11:17 PM
@tchrist Hmm the article is a bit long.
I would say, it depends on how slowly restrictions are being lifted.
 
Poof!
 
If they are being lifted very gradually, and the numbers of deaths and hospitalisations keep decreasing, then it might be OK?
 
I dunno. I've seen no difference. You can't go into a business without a mask here in Boulder, because the private owners require it. I do see little kids taking walks with their elderly grandparents, all barefaced. It's hard to get used to seeing naked faces again.
 
Nobody has ever worn mouth caps outside here.
 
Winter.
 
11:20 PM
Well, you see them, but it's mostly people who have just come out of a shop or something, or East Asians.
 
In the bleak midwinter, you wear them or your lips get necrotic.
 
We had a fairly mild winter, though not so mild as the one before.
 
Yes, the the regard for others in this is characteristically Oriental.
 
Indeed.
But I shall be very glad to be rid of those things.
 
They wear a mask if they have even a trace of a sniffle.
Because they are accustomed to living in densities that makes them breathe on each other, and it is a kindness.
 
11:22 PM
@Cerberus For covid, yes, fomite transmission seems to be rare. I was thinking more in general about any kind of immune system attack (virus or bacteria or whatever). Do you test and exercise the system (by exposing it to bad things) or do you prevent the bad things (and that's not necessarily exclusive).
 
I wonder, though, whether that will have much of an effect outside, when not talking to people up close.
 
I doubt it.
 
And I.
 
@Cerberus and at least in the US a lot of people are burned out and leaving -and- fewer nursing school grads
hm... I'm not sure about that last thing.
 
@Mitch Yes, I don't know. The answer is probably something like "it depends"...
@Mitch Yes, that is also an issue here.
The fatigue, I mean.
 
11:24 PM
@Cerberus Yeah, I don't think we should be encouraging kids to lick bus windows.
 
When the Book of Covid is written, a stout chapter on masks and myths will figure into it.
 
but hey maybe science will show that's a net gain?
 
@Mitch Oh, I do think that works well against developing allergies.
 
Because for the longest time, there was deadly denial of aerosol transmission. Instead people got all freaked out about fomites, which just aren't almost ever the cause.
 
@Cerberus But, and this is the point, you exercise your immune system -a lot- by licking a bus window. maybe a little too much?
 
11:26 PM
In practice, I don't think you can avoid the flu nor a cold in normal life, in trams and cafés and private houses, without the 1.5 m distance, which is probably not worth it outside a pandemic.
 
I've never been covidded by a fomes.
 
Still, it has been nice, never getting a cold all year long.
 
Funny how that works.
Nor flu.
 
@tchrist A denial I do not remember.
Just doubt and lack of evidence.
 
@Cerberus Really?
Well, ok.
 
11:27 PM
But I agree more emphasis could and should have been put on aërosols sooner.
 
But we had very early evidence both of a- or pre-symptomatic transmission as well as of aerosol transmission. No other theory fit the facts of those earliest tracings.
 
I was glad when I heard our school has a very good system of ventilation.
 
closed spaces are ... the main problem?
 
> Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymon: Latin fōmes. Etymology: < classical Latin fōmes (genitive fōmitis) kindling, in later use also stimulus (2nd cent. a.d.), in post-classical Latin also morbific matter (of a disease) (1546 in G. Fracastoro, or earlier) < the base of fovēre to cherish, warm (see fovent adj.); the origin of the dental suffix is unclear.
 
@Mitch Yes, well, and talking to people from a short distance.
Which is much more likely to happen amid cluttered furniture.
 
11:30 PM
Might as well be giving them CPR for how bad that is.
 
@Cerberus We're doing it right in here.
 
King's Day of this year, April 27th.
It was impossible to police the crowds in many, many places.
Various clusters of infections were identified later; however, the large majority of infections occurred inside, in private houses, rather than in the crowded parks and streets.
 
In the George Floyd protests last year, there didn't seem to be a covid bump. BUt everybody was keeping distance and everyone had masks
 
This will be an uneven year.
 
11:35 PM
They, whoever they are, need to plan out how to vaccinate India and Africa. India because holy shit it's awful there now, and Africa because what is happening in India could happen there.
 
Oh ok good, so they also think that that -t- in the 3rd-declension genitive of fomes, fomites is weird. I was trying to think of other -es > -ites nouns but couldn't.
 
@Mitch Yeah, they were not doing that on King's Day.
That's a powerless police van in their midst.
@tchrist You mean fomitis?
 
@Cerberus Because they had forgotten to plug it in the night before?
 
There is comes, comitis.
 
@Cerberus yes
 
11:37 PM
@tchrist Because one cannot control crowds so large and so many.
 
fomites is the nominative plural, so easy to mistype.
 
This was just one of many, many similar spots around the city.
Also eques, quitis.
 
Good.
So why do they say they don't know where the dental came from?
 
So I wouldn't say it's rare.
 
> < classical Latin fōmes (genitive fōmitis) kindling, in later use also stimulus (2nd cent. a.d.), in post-classical Latin also morbific matter (of a disease) (1546 in G. Fracastoro, or earlier) < the base of fovēre to cherish, warm (see fovent adj.); the origin of the dental suffix is unclear.
 
11:39 PM
I don't know where dental suffixes normally come from, but apparently they haven't found a source for one here.
 
Or maybe that's just for fovent?
But that's normal.
What else are you going to use? :)
 
Is fovent English?
Or do they mean the Latin present participle fovens, foventis?
 
> Etymology: < Latin fovent-em, present participle of fovēre to keep warm.
Well, it's been used in English, but not lately nor often.
 
Yes, that is unremarkable, and the suffix is not -t- but -nt-.
 
yeah
> Producing pleasant or salutary warmth.
> 1614 W. Raleigh Hist. World i. ii. vi. §7. 323 — All Starres haue a certaine fouent heate.
 
11:43 PM
Make sense.
 
Maybe he meant fervent. :)
 
So it's not extraordinary.
De Vaan's etymological dictionary doesn't have fomes.
 
the -t- in plural sounds really natural
 
But, apparently, it is not expected in fomes.
No idea why not.
Could be a great question for latin.stackexchange.com
 
I don't know enough to ask
I am the fourth child at seder
nope...the third son, who is simple. The fourth son doesn't know to even ask.
 
11:53 PM
You could post Tchrist's quotation and ask why this dental suffix is unexpected or what's unclear about it.
 
Also, I don't have a dog in this fight.
I don't have skin in the game
 
But do you have fomite in the fire?
 
I don't have to go see a man about a dog
ooh do I have fire in the belly?
Does heartburn count?
haha
hahahah
medical humor
tastelsss health humor
poop jokes are not far
and that is off topic
 
coughs
 
puts mask back on
 

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