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2:43 AM
I had a weird dream in which they connected Yekaterinburg, Moscow and London subways with high-speed underground tunnels. So I traveled to Moscow and visited my sister, and then traveled to London and took some photos of huge beautiful autumn trees.
In the end, I got anxious, because my phone battery was running low, and I needed to find my way back to the necessary subway station.
I remember the ads everywhere in the London subway, on huge screens with sound on.
They called on women to enter the STEM specialities.
@Robusto Thank you!
@Robusto Now I understand the message "mind the gap"
 
 
1 hour later…
4:12 AM
Ouch.
 
4:36 AM
> "DON'T KISS! Kissing spreads the most widespread disease of this year - the flu" Cover of "Ogonyok" Soviet magazine, 1928
 
4:47 AM
> Post Soviet visual. Warm-up of a guard of honor soldier, Russia, 1990s
 
5:20 AM
A 2013 study by Nasser et al. found that the retinal dopaminergic response to eating a brownie is equivalent in magnitude to the response to a 20 mg dose of methylphenidate, which implies that the activity of dopamine neurons in the retina reflects brain dopaminergic activity.
Electroretinography measures the electrical responses of various cell types in the retina, including the photoreceptors (rods and cones), inner retinal cells (bipolar and amacrine cells), and the ganglion cells. Electrodes are placed on the surface of the cornea (DTL silver/nylon fiber string or ERG Jet) or on the skin beneath the eye (Sensor Strips) to measure retinal responses. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) responses are measured with an EOG test with skin-contact electrodes placed near the canthi. During a recording, the patient's eyes are exposed to standardized stimuli and the resulting...
A chocolate brownie or simply a brownie is a square or rectangular chocolate baked confection. Brownies come in a variety of forms and may be either fudgy or cakey, depending on their density. They may include nuts, frosting, cream cheese, chocolate chips, or other ingredients. A variation made with brown sugar and vanilla rather than chocolate in the batter is called a blond brownie or blondie. The brownie was developed in the United States at the end of the 19th century and popularized in the U.S. and Canada during the first half of the 20th century. Brownies are bar cookies and not considered...
 
5:36 AM
Word of the day: roided up (as if on steroids)
Adjective: roided up (comparative more roided up, superlative most roided up)
  1. (slang) On steroids.
 
 
3 hours later…
9:06 AM
New Delta descendant may be more infectious than its ancestor ft.com/content/f1ec9d5d-9e02-4cc4-95e7-1dcbb1844d43
 
 
1 hour later…
10:28 AM
The First total census of the Russian Empire in 1897 showed that over 70% of the people were illiterate.
Just 125 years ago, two people out of three could not read and write. Or maybe they could do it only slowly? I don't know.
It's hard to imagine a person not being able to read at all. How about shop signs?
 
11:27 AM
Russia may go into a week-long lockdown from 30 October e1.ru/text/world/2021/10/19/70202780
 
11:45 AM
@CowperKettle I first read that as 'stop signs'. It was a little upseting.
 
 
1 hour later…
12:46 PM
> Using machine learning, a computer model can teach itself to smell in just a few minutes. When it does, researchers have found, it builds a neural network that closely mimics the olfactory circuits that animal brains use to process odors.
 
 
2 hours later…
2:19 PM
 
@CowperKettle I too hope that happens to him someday. And the sooner, the better!
 
2:38 PM
@CowperKettle I doubt whether this is real even for Trump.
 
2:55 PM
@Cerberus If it's a facsimile, it's pretty on point. The tortured grammar, it's a petty backhanded compliment (and forehanded insult), it's really all about Trump.
 
 
1 hour later…
4:01 PM
Maybe it should be prohibited for politicians running for President to appear on TV.
And then people will start reading their speeches in text, and thinking more.
And we will have smarter politicians again, like in the 19th century.
 
4:21 PM
@tchrist I just pulled out my copy of "Advanced Programming in the UNiX Environment". I was slightly curious how Stevens died, then came across a Slashdot thread where you mention you knew him. Do you have to have a link to an obituary online? If not, never mind.
BTW, needed to read about "Process Control", which happens to be Ch 8. Is that the best reference for this material, in your opinion?
 
 
1 hour later…
5:46 PM
@Mitch Yeah. It doesn't take a genius to emulate his patterns.
 
@Robusto haha. any idiot can say that.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:11 PM
@Mitch I think he would normally be told not to speak ill of the dead...
 
@Robusto But he was told not to, and he didn't, not in public, did he?
 
@Cerberus Trump never edited himself. If he said it in private, he said it in public.
 
7:56 PM
@Cerberus told? It's usually much further down the speculation trail to think of what other people are counseling famous people to say
Usually first comes their past behavior and speculating about motives, not about what other people tell him to do and whether he would take that counsel
But, somewhat topically, I've been seeing a lot of negative things said about Powell since he died -and- replies that say it's wrong to say I'll of the dead (at least the recently dead)
The last thing makes sense for a nonpublic person
But for a politician I feel at death time there should be a public reckoning of their place in history, good and bad
 
8:53 PM
@Mitch Yeah, you may feel that way, but the fact remains that if you do take that opportunity to speak ill of the dead you will be viewed as not having any class.
 
9:29 PM
@Robusto OK I get that, but does that mean that if someone dies, you can't ever say anything bad about them? I think most people would say that you can say bad things about Stalin and Hitler. So that means there must be some point at which you can start to say bad things. Is the worst thing you can say in a public obituary that the deceased had a 'controversial legacy'?
 
@Mitch This rule applies only to non-monsters.
I would apply it to Colin Powell without hesitation.
 
@Mitch I would say, unless the person was a monster, and unless it is part of some long analysis, you shouldn't do it immediately upon his death.
 
> Mr. Schicklgruber became a vegan in his twenties after working in a slaughterhouse one summer as a teenager, was adamant in convincing his friends and colleagues to give up smoking, and was a lifelong supporter of prevention of animal cruelty (adopting raising a number of abandoned dogs). His political career had ups and downs, and some of his policies raised eyebrows. He was interred next to his long time and recently married sweet-heart"
@Cerberus OK so you can eventually be more ... factual?
@Robusto I agree that Powell seemed to be very much a non-monster.
But the time to do a more realistic assessment is when it's in everybody's minds, and that happens when they die. How long do you wait? By that time everyone has forgotten.
Of course, I was reading a twitter chain about this and the framing may have screwed up my entire perspective.
Sure the assessment should have come well before they died.
-but- if you're doing an assessment as part of an obituary... shouldn't it be factual rather than hagiographical?
I'm trying to think of controversial people who were not monsters.
Nixon?
 
@Mitch Sure!
You could say, wait until the hypothetical family have had some time to grieve.
 
9:44 PM
@Cerberus OK but there is a difference between a politician and a regular person.
 
@Mitch I think it is always valid in a long analysis.
@Mitch True, but still.
 
I mean I feel bad for Stalin's children.
adult children. but still
 
@Mitch I would say a newspaper can mention some bad things he did in a longish obituary, but in a very factual way.
 
This would be my response to monsters like Hitler, Stalin, Trump, etc.
 
@Robusto Yeah man that was uncool
At least Dorothy felt bad a little
 
9:47 PM
She got over it.
 
As coroner I must aver
I've thoroughly examined her
And she's not only merely dead
She's really most sincerely dead
 
@Robusto OK what is the demarcation line for monster? GWB could be so considered moreso than TFG because the former actively pursued killing hundreds of thousands in another country, where the orange idiot was just an incompetent buffoon and could have handled COVID better.
and we're slowly slipping towards Powell being monster adjacent
 
@Mitch Your estimation of the orange idiot is too lenient in several particulars. How about trying to overthrow constitutional government? Where does that fit in your list of "minor issues"?
I'll take my answer offline. I have to go to the store now. Ta.
 
@Robusto everything is arguable. monsters usually kill lots of people. I don't think Anthony Weiner is a monster, but his obituary should mention... some of his activities that got him into trouble.
@Robusto maybe I'm fixating on the word 'monster'. I'm pretty certain TFG's obituary will be a -lot- of euphemism and equivocation that he (and his family) doesn't deserve
 
10:51 PM
Word of the day: Toilettenbürstenbenutzungsanweisung
 
@Mitch What did he do?
 
I have seen this one before.
Note that the Romans used a brush as in Abbildung 3.
Note 2: I'd rather not have people use the brush as in Abbildung 4.
 
I heard about Romans, and it grossed me out
My sister, upon returning from India, for some time said that the mere thought of people using toilet paper grossed her out.
In India, people wash after every number 2.
44% Russians support democracy, 47% don’t. The ratio is 50% vs 46% for those under 24.
 
11:28 PM
Hmm.
What was the wording of the question, exactly?
And is the surveying organisation reliable?
 
@Cerberus Yes, it's reliable. It's the Levada Foundation, proclaimed a "Foreign Agent" by Putin's authorities.
The oldest polling foundation of Russia.
 
I see.
 
> "Please tell us whether you can consider yourself a democrat, a person who supports democratic values?"
 
That is already slightly more ambiguous.
 
Yes.
 
11:31 PM
The word could have various connotations in Russia.
 
People's democracy was a theoretical concept within Marxism–Leninism and a form of government which developed after World War II and that allowed in theory for a multi-class, multi-party democracy on the pathway to socialism. People's democracy was considered "a form of political organization of society established in a number of European and Asian countries as a result of the people’s democratic revolutions of the 1940’s."Prior to the rise of fascism, communist parties had called for Soviet Republics to be implemented throughout the world, such as the Chinese Soviet Republic or William Z. Foster...
They even came up with "People's democracy" back in the day.
To explain autocracy.
 
11:56 PM
@Mitch Maybe I'm being obtuse, but who is TFG?
 

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