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1:37 AM
I had a weird dream in which top Russian politicians were driving in a bus and singing. And in the end they killed the Police minister.
It was like in a musical movie. They were singing jolly, and the minister was a solo. He sang that he wants everyone to be subject to him.
So in the end they are tired with his desire for supreme power, and strangle him.
But all in a jolly, singing manner.
And there was another dream, in which I lived in a community house, full of students, and woke up and one of them proposed that we take a morning ride on bicycles. But I was too tired from the jog I had yesterday.
With much disappointment, I was forced to skip this morning ride.
I'm indeed still feeling tired from the Saturday jog.
 
1:58 AM
 
 
1 hour later…
3:27 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Few unique characters in answer, no whitespace in answer, repeating characters in answer (263): Curiosity and curiousness by user436397 on english.SE
 
3:53 AM
 
 
8 hours later…
11:46 AM
Sadly, behind a paywall
 
 
1 hour later…
12:50 PM
I think that question s of this type can be answered by appealing directly to national character. The English are 'those' kind of people because of a collective failure in a very specific aspect of personality (their 'to-ness' if you will). I mean I suppose some people from England are OK despite this. Or maybe the change in perspective from 'to' to 'from' really exhibits their pusillanimity. I bet the English cringe too when they say 'to' but they just don't have the will to do otherwise. — Mitch 1 min ago
Was that mean?
It was mean.
Deleted
but I had fun while writing it.
To be honest, Somehow I thought the whole controversy was over using 'from' vs 'than' and had no idea that 'to' was even an option.
Also in all honesty, 'different to' sounds pretty weird to me like 'to hospital' does.
Since we're all being so honest here, I should really confess to that one time when I was eight years old and my older sister (10 at the time) convinced me to to do some petty shoplifting. I think it was for cigarettes? way before they started putting them behind the counter...now that I think of it probably because of people like me.
So I'm either sorry, or you should be thanking me.
 
Oct 25 '20 at 14:59, by Matt E. Эллен
@skullpatrol the "British English (2019)" data is a lot different to the whole English data, for this query
Sep 28 '20 at 9:33, by Matt E. Эллен
(although I think the US snack "Milky Way" is different to the UK one, so I'm not sure it's universally true)
@Mitch I got very confused when I started to be confronted with "different than"
Feb 20 '19 at 17:01, by Matt E. Эллен
since tone is part of pronunciation, I'm trying to understand how the flat ō is different to no tone o
@Mitch thnaks. Because of you I was never asked to steal cigarettes
 
1:30 PM
Colin Luther Powell (; April 5, 1937 – October 18, 2021) was an American politician, diplomat and four-star general who served as the 65th United States Secretary of State from 2001 to 2005. He was the first African-American Secretary of State. Prior to the election of Barack Obama as president in 2008, he and his successor, Condoleezza Rice, were the highest-ranking African Americans in the history of the federal executive branch (by virtue of the Secretary of State standing fourth in the presidential line of succession). He served as the 16th United States National Security Advisor from 1987...
Died of covid complications
 
 
2 hours later…
3:22 PM
@MattE.Эллен Well, you -should- be thanking my sister. But that's how good she taught me, I five-finger discounted your gratitude straight to me.
Eight years old seems really young. It had to have been say 10 years old.
so much more mature by then
 
2 eighths more mature
 
like a fine cheese
 
smelly and expensive
 
What's your philosophy on eating the rind of brie/camembert?
 
I eat the top, but I leave the rim
 
3:25 PM
I'll cut it away if I can. but resign myself to it if it's unavoidable.
I mean it's edible and has no taste, but...
it's not like the core of an apple or grapes with seeds.
Seeds in grapes really bother me
You're eating something so wonderful and then did I just crush a glass marble?
Is the grocer trying to kill me by making me eat ground glass?
It's like having the label of your tea bag (along with the staple) fall into your tea cup.
 
Somehow it can't possibly alter the taste
yet
you want to pour it out and go back to bed
@CowperKettle I suggest to the SE developers that when something is starred that if it is an image, that the image be put in the starboard, not some indecipherable URL.
 
I'm reading up on multiple myeloma. Colin Powell had it. I never heard of it before.
Current weather. +5C, drizzle, overcast
Henry Bence Jones FRS (31 December 1813 – 20 April 1873) was an English physician and chemist. == Early life == Bence Jones was born at Thorington Hall, Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, the son of Lieutenant Colonel William Jones, an officer in the 5th Dragoon Guards, and Matilda (née Bence) Jones (a daughter of the Rev. Bence Bence of Thorington Hall, Suffolk). His elder brother was the prominent agriculturist William Bence Jones, who married Caroline Dickinson (a daughter of William Dickinson, MP). He attended school in Hingham, Norfolk, as well as a private school in Putney. He entered Harrow in 1827...
The guy who described one of the first known cases of multiple myeloma
A Bence Jones protein is a monoclonal globulin protein or immunoglobulin light chain found in the urine, with a molecular weight of 22–24 kDa. Detection of Bence Jones protein may be suggestive of multiple myeloma or Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. Bence Jones proteins are particularly diagnostic of multiple myeloma in the context of target organ manifestations such as kidney failure, lytic (or "punched out") bone lesions, anemia, or large numbers of plasma cells in the bone marrow of patients. Bence Jones proteins are present in 2/3 of multiple myeloma cases.The proteins are immunoglobulin...
 
3:59 PM
@Mitch or have it so hovering over the image url shows a popup of the image. having images in the starboard would force a lot of the messages off the page
 
Epigenitically?
 
4:47 PM
> One example: children who grew in the womb during the hunger winter of 1944/45 show typical changes in their metabolism as an adaption to food scarcity during development and this is associated with a higher risk of diabetes and obesity.
Curiously, the Wikipedia user who started the article about the Hunger Winter back in 2003 is still working on Wikipedia, with his/her last edits dating today.
The Anome is a second-wave Wikipedian. The Anome abides. == Tools == https://quarry.wmflabs.org https://petscan.wmflabs.org/ https://wikishootme.toolforge.org/ https://geograph2commons.toolforge.org/ https://wikimap.toolforge.org/ https://query.wikidata.org/ == Interesting reading == http://www.mdpi.org/entropy/papers/e7010068.pdf == To do == === People === Dave Lampert, (David Lee Lampert?) sex toy pioneer, recently became independently notable following his death === Work in progress === Template:Delusion === Wikidata === look at KnotInfo stuff, and in particular why their Ale...
 
@CowperKettle Why curiously?
The Anome is a really cool username.
 
@Cerberus Yes? It has a meaning? I'll look it up
I translated the article into Russian in November 2008 for the Russian Wikipedia
 
The Anome (alternative title: The Faceless Man) is a science fiction novel by American writer Jack Vance, first published in 1973 (copyright 1971); it is the first book in the Durdane series of novels. == Plot summary == It tells the story of a boy growing to manhood in the land of Shant, a society composed of many different, and wildly individual cantons, some of which are run by cults. Each adult wears an explosive torc which can be detonated by remote command, bringing about instant death by decapitation. The torcs are controlled by an anonymous dictator, the Anome, whose identity is literally...
@CowperKettle Cool.
 
I was writing psychiatry-related articles, and the Hunger Winter interested me because of increased prevalence of psychiatric disease in children due to epigenetic factors
So I wrote the page about the Operation Manna, the US operation to provide food to the Netherlands
Операция «Манна» — сброс продовольствия страдающему от голода населению Голландии в последние дни перед капитуляцией Германии. Вылеты осуществлялись над оккупированными территориями Нидерландов с 29 апреля по 8 мая 1945 года. 6680 тонн доставили ВВС Великобритании, 4000 тонн — ВВС США, чья операция называлась «Обжора» (англ. Chowhound). Начальное планирование было выполнено Королевскими ВВС, и операции часто объединяют в названии «Manna-Chowhound». Согласие на проведение гуманитарной операции дал рейхскомиссар оккупированных Нидерландов Артур Зейсс-Инкварт. Название было позаимствовано из Библии...
I mean translated from English
 
@MattE.Эллен Yes, that's better
 
4:58 PM
@CowperKettle Nice.
In what parts of Europe was there a Hunger Winter?
My grandmother ate tulip bulbs.
Because those were available.
 
@Cerberus In the Netherlands
The Dutch famine of 1944–1945, known in the Netherlands as the Hongerwinter (literal translation: hunger winter), was a famine that took place in the German-occupied Netherlands, especially in the densely populated western provinces north of the great rivers, during the winter of 1944–1945, near the end of World War II. A German blockade cut off food and fuel shipments from farm towns. Some 4.5 million were affected and survived thanks to soup kitchens. Loe de Jong (1914–2005), author of The Kingdom of the Netherlands During World War II, estimated at least 22,000 deaths occurred due to the famine...
> The Dutch famine of 1944–1945, known in the Netherlands as the Hongerwinter (literal translation: hunger winter), was a famine that took place in the German-occupied Netherlands
@Cerberus My grandmother did not tell me what she ate. Probably potatoes ))
I think that hunger was widespread, but what mattered in the Netherlands is that the country had a well-functioning medical statistics system, which allowed later scientists to research the correlations.
In other places, there were no exact records.
In the GULAG, deaths peaked in late 1941- early 1943.
And Germans captured at Stalingrad did not make it out alive mostly. Because there was little food available.
 
5:56 PM
> Colonels of the French Guards and British guards politely discussing who should fire first at the battle of Fontenoy, 1745
 
6:12 PM
@CowperKettle Did not other European countries have the same?
 
6:49 PM
@Cerberus I don't know. Probably it was the Dutch thing because of the specific situation in the late 1944
An in-browser simulation of all transistors in the first ARM processor from the 1980s. visual6502.org/sim/varm/armgl.html
The latest iteration is Apple M1 Max, and it has 57 billion transistors.
It will be some time before there will be an in-browser simulation of that one.
 
7:01 PM
@tchrist: Did you ever study any Catalan?
@CowperKettle Interesting historical tidbit: In Anglo-Saxon England, the period in summer before the first harvest was called "the hungry gap." It was the time when the food that had been stored for the winter was largely depleted, and everyone had to tighten their belts until the harvest came in.
Sometimes it did, sometimes it didn't. And if it didn't, bad news for everybody.
There is a Christian feast day on August 1 called Lammas (OE hlaf-mas, or "loaf mass") which celebrates the harvest.
And no wonder.
Lammas Day (Anglo-Saxon hlaf-mas, "loaf-mass"), also known as Loaf Mass Day, is a Christian holiday celebrated in some English-speaking countries in the Northern Hemisphere on 1 August. The name originates from the word "loaf" in reference to bread and "Mass" in reference to the primary Christian liturgy celebrating Holy Communion. It is a festival in the liturgical calendar to mark the blessing of the First Fruits of harvest, with a loaf of bread being brought to the church for this purpose.On Loaf Mass Day, it is customary to bring to a Christian church a loaf made from the new crop, which began...
It seems the "hungry gap" has migrated in Britain to the springtime, and presently refers to the time when fresh vegetables are not yet in season and those from the last harvest are used up.
> The Hungry Gap is the hardest time of year for UK farmers: a few weeks, usually in April, May and early June, after the winter crops have ended but before the new season’s plantings are ready to harvest.
 
7:29 PM
How far civilisation has come.
 
8:07 PM
@Robusto I've looked at it because I've worked in Barcelona a few weeks at a time twice now, and I needed to be able to read stuff there.
What you call "study" I don't know. I don't remember the conjugations, but if you know some each of Spanish and French and Italian, it makes good enough sense. There's some interplay with Sardinian characteristics in the insular dialects but you probably don't run across those much on the mainland.
 
8:56 PM
> The aim of the study was to identify the lowest amount of virus to safely and reliably infect someone, so researchers can later easily test the efficacy of vaccines or antivirals on future challenge trial volunteers. “Of course, in doing that, you learn a lot about the actual disease, which indeed we have,” said Dr. Andrew Catchpole, chief scientific officer at hVIVO, a British clinical and laboratory services company that partnered with Imperial College London to conduct Britain’s Covid-19 challenge study.
@tchrist A friend just got back from Mallorca with a lot of pictures, and I wasn't sure what I was looking at in signs and the like. Some seemed obvious, some occulted in some strange ways.
Do they use sao for santo, like the Portuguese?
Or maybe just sa?
And sometimes sant.
I'm confused.
And they use the French /ç/ as in Port Pollença.
And Cala Sant Vicenç.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:56 PM
@Robusto It's Sant but might get apocopated to Sa the way Santo becomes San in Spanish unless the next word starts with To or Do.
That way you don't wonder if it's a Santo Mingo not a Santo Domingo.
And so that Santo Tomás doesn't leave you wondering about one Santo Más. :)
 
In Mallorca, they speak Mallorquín. Each island has its own variant. It is an offshoot of Catalan.
The ç is also in Catalan.
 

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