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12:28 AM
> A 102-year-old woman has recovered from coronavirus in the northern Italian city of Genoa after spending more than 20 days in hospital, doctors who treated her and her nephew told CNN.

"She only had some mild coronavirus symptoms, so we tested her and she was positive, but we did very little, she recovered on her own," Sicbaldi added.

Doctors say her case impressed them so much that they decided to study it deeper.

"We got serological samples, she is the first patient we know that might have gone through the ‘Spanish flu’ since she was born in 1917," Sicbaldi explained, referring to th
2
 
 
2 hours later…
2:01 AM
@Mitch I'll leave those to you, then!
@tchrist Hmm but the Spanish flu was influenza, was it not?
So a completely different virus.
 
This virus was discovered in 1968.
 
2:39 AM
Mar 12 at 9:13, by Færd
You might want to take this Coronavirus quiz from Harvard Medical School. Pass it and you get enrolled.
@Færd thanks for sharing
 
 
6 hours later…
8:43 AM
@skullpatrol You're welcome! I hope it's not outdated by now. :)
@Cerberus Apparently he's exempted religious congregations from the emergency ban on gatherings because they are "essential to Brazil" or something.
Even in the fucking Islamic Republic of Iran all religious ceremonies have been cancelled.
To the dismay of many a zealot.
Apparently there's no rock bottom when it comes to stupidity.
 
9:06 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Offensive answer detected, repeating characters in answer, toxic answer detected (239): Can you call an apartment a house? by Digbick69 on english.SE
 
9:26 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted user (71): Can you call an apartment a house? by Digbick69 on english.SE
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted user (71): Can you call an apartment a house? by Digbick69 on english.SE
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted user (71): Can you call an apartment a house? by Richard Phister on english.SE
 
9:54 AM
> The design and implementation of Quality Systems and Procedures are governed by Quality Assurance function at site.
Does it mean there's a QA deparment at this pharma production site?
Or does it mean there are workers whose positions include the mention of "Quality Assurance"?
Or does it mean there's a single worker/manager for this purpose?
 
10:13 AM
@CowperKettle that's wonky English to begin with. There's an article missing, and I would say "on site", not "at".
At any rate, all it's saying is that some kind of QA at least occasionally exists, and when it does, it takes place on site rather than elsewhere.
Whether there's a permanent department at the company proper, or just a bloke with a wrench visiting every other year, is anybody's guess.
Anyway.
Here's for a brainfuck I watched last night.
First, a quote from Twitter that went viral.
> Bloomberg spent $500 million on ads.
The US population is 327 million.
He could have given each American $1 million and still have money left over.
I feel like a $1 million cheque would be life-changing for most people.
Yet he wasted it all on ads and STILL LOST.
Now, if you're not seeing what's wrong with it, or not seeing it immediately at first glance, you're not alone. Millions of people fell for it.
Sometimes it's amazing how our brains process language.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:31 AM
@RegDwigнt Yes, it was writtten by an Indian guy.
I was told by fellow translators that the worst English is penned by Chinese guys.
Indian English is nice.
 
 
1 hour later…
12:42 PM
@Cerberus Correct
 
1:17 PM
 
 
1 hour later…
2:37 PM
@RegDwigнt Or don't.
@CowperKettle Well, Indian English can be very good, if you have a good writer, but the standard traps Indians fall into sound barbarous in non-Asian dialects of English.
Chinese are harder to understand when speaking, generally, while Indians do much better. Their only failing seems to be mapping their primary language's prosody and vocal cadence to English, which can be difficult for other speakers of English to follow at times.
It's like anything else, though. If you get a talented individual, you can be very impressed with their output. The run of the mill, less so.
 
3:12 PM
@Færd That's fairly crazy.
Even here, all events are forbidden, except religious gatherings under 30 people provided that people can keep a distance 1.5 metres.
@RegDwigнt How could anyone not see what is wrong with that?
 
@Cerberus Because most people have the minds of 12-year-olds.
Not even, probably.
Most never really reach the formal operational stage of cognitive development.
 
3:54 PM
> "The formal operational thinker has the ability to consider many different solutions to a problem before acting. This greatly increases efficiency, because the individual can avoid potentially unsuccessful attempts at solving a problem. The formal operational person considers past experiences, present demands, and future consequences in attempting to maximize the success of his or her adaptation to the world."
How many MAGA people does that describe? Very few, IMO.
 
@Cerberus well, have you watched the video? People did not see what's wrong with that on national television.
@Robusto holy shit, Katrina was 15 years ago? Time flies.
 
Ayup. It does.
 
But not at this pace. Come on. No fair.
@tchrist that image was actually televised on the evening news in Germany yesterday.
@tchrist good on the 102-yo lady. Meanwhile, I've heard a 16-yo kid died.
 
@RegDwigнt Life ain't fair.
 
Civilization exists by geological consent, subject to change without notice.
 
4:08 PM
Where have I heard that one before?
 
I don't know. Bernie Taupin?
Oh actually. Actually. Last night for whatever reason YouTube decided to show me a Letterman interview with Trump from like 1983 or something.
And I actually watched it.
Here's my question: what the fuck has happened to Trump.
It's not that he was decent or even just nice. But. Well. He wasn't this that he is now.
 
@RegDwigнt A small mind, reduced by time.
 
I resist all forms of that man, in all venues.
 
It's like he has a not-quite-as-evil twin brother.
@Robusto I pondered for like ten minutes if I should click on it or not.
But then curiosity won over.
 
4:13 PM
Yeah, I'm not curious anymore.
 
It's hard to be if you've traveled a quarter of a century in time and saw the outcome.
Fuck no, that's not even 25, that's 35 years.
 
Almost a lifetime, for you.
 
Quite so.
86, I only just started with my first piano lessons.
 
Curiously, I recently discovered a mention of him in a novel I wrote in the '90s. And apparently I accepted his standard image of a tycoon.
I do remember my uncle, a financier, talking about him in the late '80s, when he summed him up this way: "If you borrow $100 and can't pay it back, you're in trouble; if you borrow $1 billion and can't pay it back, the bank is in trouble."
 
Yeah that's a phrase I've heard before. Not sure where.
That's the one thing I kept in the back of my head while watching that interview. That from what we know now, he was bankrupt at the time. And not just morally, but actually fiscally as well.
 
4:22 PM
Don't forget mentally.
 
Right. I always forget mentally.
 
High in the running for worst human being on the planet.
 
> Trump Says He Told Pence to Ignore Governors in Hard-Hit Areas If They Are ‘Not Appreciative’
> As the U.S. death toll reached 1,500, the president says he told the head of the White House’s coronavirus task force not to bother calling state governors in some hot spot areas.
> “He calls all the governors,” Trump said. “I tell him, I mean, I’m a different type of person. I say Mike, don’t call the governor of Washington, you’re wasting your time with him. Don’t call the woman in Michigan.”
“If they don’t treat you right, I don’t call,” Trump said.
Is this actually happening.
 
I knew it! He's turned the Wihite House into a casino.
 
More to the point, as we only just discussed, he sure knows how to manage a casino into the ground.
 
4:32 PM
@RegDwigнt Oh, absolutely. Governors must not only have a desperate populace they're trying to protect, they must abase themselves before his majesty.
 
Like, that's some next level skills. A casino runs itself. You have to be really really good at making things go belly-up to make a casino go belly-up.
 
And now he's practicing this on the country as a whole.
 
@Robusto I've been at a loss for words before, but now I'm at a loss for words to so much as express "I'm at a loss for words".
The French would have kicked him out of the office, day one.
 
@RegDwigнt Welcome to the club.
 
And like, literally kicked. With their own feet, through the streets.
 
4:34 PM
I am not normally at a loss for words. In fact, I generally have more than I need, and use them profligately. Now, however, I'm simply flabbergasted at each new affront to civilization and decency.
 
@Robusto that is not a type of club I have asked for ingress into.
 
And yet you are a member.
 
I sure hope the club at least has free socialist healthcare.
 
Heh. You wish.
 
Well fuck.
I bought some vodka today, and I'm starting drinking now. No countdown.
 
4:36 PM
Mar 25 at 0:24, by Robusto
user image
@RegDwigнt Remember, you're not really drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on.
 
Good one.
I'm not much of a drinker, then.
Never even lay on the floor, hands or no hands.
 
I've crossed the threshold a couple times. Not for decades, though.
 
I'm just generally no friends with gravity.
Anything that attracts me, I find repulsive.
Why did I change lay to lied. Changing it right back.
 
Actually, I would use lie there. Lay is past tense of lie.
I don't think you would use past there.
 
Well. But I did use the past. So if anything using lied was doubly wrong.
Hm. That's not even the consolation that I mean. But also nice.
Where's the one that I mean.
I need the №8 not 4.
Ah there you go.
So many consolations this guy wrote.
Some in-your-face Rachmaninoff in there.
 
4:51 PM
@RegDwigнt I thought all Rachmaninoff was in your face.
Oh, btw, I wanted to ask you about Dostoevsky.
 
Well. When I played Rachmaninoff as a kid, it sure felt like he punched me in the face with my own fist.
Dostoevsky was a child molester. Is all I know.
 
I haven't read him since high school, but my wife's book club just read Crime and Punishment and she found it nearly unreadable. I thought maybe it was a translation problem (i.e., poor translator), but maybe you can tell me if he's any better a writer in the original?
I told her she'd probably do better with Tolstoy.
 
Well that's his distinct feature. He wrote like twenty pages at once, on the night before it was due to be given to the publisher. Never proofread a word. Ever.
Stream of consciousness.
Where's that bit about my dad. Let me see.
> So I was like twelve and I made the mistake of reading Dostoyevski. Way too early. Too young. And that spoiled Dostoyevski for me, and I've never read anything of his ever again.
And my dad had been warning me. He warned me alright.
Look, he said. He took a piece of paper and a pencil and drew a straight line. Look. This is how Pushkin writes.
Eugene Onegin, Dame Pique, the Bronze Horseman. Look. This is how he writes. A straight line.
> And I looked, and I nodded, and I knew. I knew all the titles. I had read all the books. A straight line.
He drew a squiggly line atop the straight line. Crossing it back and forth. A sinus wave. This is Tolstoy, he said. This is Tolstoy's writing.
And I nodded and I knew.
> And then he took the pencil once again and carefully, slowly, painstakingly drew a sinus wave along the sinus wave. A squiggly line hugging the squiggly line. A line going back and forth across the line going back and forth across the straight line.
This, he said, this here is Dostoyevski. This is what Dostoyevski does.
> He writes round and about and about and around. All around the around. Branches off the branches, dances around the dance, beats around the beating of the bush. Or whatever similes you prefer.
This is Dostoyevski, my father said. When you grow up, you'll understand. When you grow up, you'll be ready. You're not ready yet.
My father was right.
So basically I'm still waiting to grow up.
 
Hah. Good one. I do think I remember you saying this some time ago.
 
Well that's where I'm copying it from. This very room.
Was talking to Tom at the time.
So anyway. Don't read Dostoyevski. I know people say that he's an excellent psychoanalyst. I know people whom I trust a lot that say that. But life is too short.
 
4:59 PM
Ayup.
I read C&P in high school, but I have virtually no recollection of it at this time. Other books stuck with me, but not that one.
 
Read Chekhov (not the pieces, only the prose). Read Turgenew. Read Lermontov.
Read Oblomov by Ivan Gontcharov.
 
OK.
 
And read Master and Margarita by Bulgakov.
 
makes notes
 
As well as his short stories from the time he was a surgeon in a remote Russian village.
Basically pick up whoever has short stories on offer and see if you get hooked.
 
5:02 PM
kk
 
If you don't, move on to the next guy. The Russians have an awful lot of those.
But if you do, well look into the larger works, then.
 
An awful lot of next guys?
 
Yes. Literally every time I'm in Russia there's some guy right next to me.
 
Funny how that works.
 
Thankfully in Russia I can be sure that the guy is not a gay.
Phew.
 
5:03 PM
Yeah. Putin did away with gayness, IIRC.
 
Yes, naked on a horse he did away with it. As well as away with his wife.
The full monty.
Why did I say pieces for plays right now. I need more vodka.
 
Vodka always helps with that.
 
Well пьеса is the Russian word.
Its own mother wouldn't recognize it. But that's what it is. Piece.
We always make sure nobody recognizes the words that we've stolen.
 
> All of which illustrates what it really means for states to be begging the federal government for supplies, even as Trump is treating this as yet another matter he can play games with by going on Hannity and spreading around his magical chaos pixie dust for his base to joyfully snort.
> And make no mistake: That’s what this is. Trump is suggesting rather explicitly that he does not recognize any serious urgency to act in a way that might avert countless needless deaths.
 
Yes, read it all just now.
 
5:13 PM
Morally and financially and intellectually bankrupt.
 
And that's the WP, mind. Not the most leftistest of papers.
 
No. But to Trump anybody who says anything critical of him is singled out for special animosity.
 
Gangsta style
 
Pretty much nails it.
 
Not surprising considering most of his advisers are convicted felons.
picked up through his casinos, no doubt
 
5:26 PM
To whom he dispenses pardons liberally.
 
yup
 
5:58 PM
> U.S. President Donald Trump, seen here wearing a campaign cap during a meeting to discuss the pandemic at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta earlier this month, is seeing the best polling numbers of his presidency. (Hyosub Shin/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via The Associated Press)
the best polling numbers of his presidency
 
Yeah. Go figure. But remember, he's still in the 40s. Most people can't stand him.
But of course he'll be encouraged to be an even bigger AH by this.
 
Trump is in his 40s?
 
In approval rating.
 
ah
still the best he's seen
 
Wait'll things get worse.
 
6:04 PM
yeah, he'll lash out at the Canadians
 
Only after lashing out at the Democrats, or anyone else who criticizes him.
 
23 hours ago, by skullpatrol
@Robusto if it's possible for him to put troops on the Canadian border, anything is possible.
 
I agree.
 
45 mins ago, by skullpatrol
Gangsta style
nothing worse than a popular gangster
 
This is how democracies fall.
 
6:09 PM
Mar 25 at 17:24, by skullpatrol
the western world has crumbled in less than a week
 
6:20 PM
2 days ago, by M.A.R.
Well, let's not remind the world that a space rock killed four fifths of all living beings on Earth
Pardon all the in-line messages.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:29 PM
Mar 12 at 22:18, by Cerberus
Oh, OK.
Just watched Birdman
A surreal, very odd movie
A must watch
 
 
1 hour later…
8:33 PM
@M.A.R. Good film. Well done.
 
8:44 PM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in body (96): Whats the best for these movie sites? by Sophia Maria Rodriguez on english.SE
 
 
3 hours later…
11:33 PM
@tchrist @Robusto so if you're interested, the Duruflé is finished and I've set the score to public just now.
The audio is a live recording, of course.
It's quite mesmerizing — listening to the piece while following along in the score.
Obviously I've done that countless times now, from many different points in the piece. And every single time it's almost impossible to not listen till the very end. You have to force yourself.
It's as if time itself stops.
You sit and listen to a small collection of nine short songs. Some fit on just two pages.
Forty minutes fly by like four.
 

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