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11:02 PM
That's a big if.
I used to know the codes for the most common diacriticised letters.
 
11:34 PM
@Cerberus Right. In theory it's a big if, but you quickly get to know the best input method for the ones you actually use.
 
Only for the ones you use often.
But something like ç I just don't use often enough. But I still want to type it when I need it!
Or ™.
Or ō.
And why memorise characters when you don't have to, and when the alternative method of typing them is also quicker?
But, ah, people are like that.
I know my quest is in vain.
 
@Cerberus If you use Windows you might want to look seriously at the US-International input method.
The ç is AltGr+,
Actually, it's easier than that. It's '+c. A digraph.
The © and the ® are AltGr chords. But ™ is Alt++2122 because it's not on the USI.
 
11:56 PM
@MετάEd I often type 'c. That would hinder my workflow. I remember the default keyboard in Windows where I would type ÖK I'll do it" all the time. And c,, has no such disadvantage.
Autohotkey really is far superior to any other method I have ever heard of.
 
And o with macron is best entered using copy/past.
 
Why?
What's wrong with o-=- ?
Or any combination you like.
 
On Windows 7 you can't get it with the USI input method or the Unicode numeric method, nor is it present on any of the default codepages.
 
I use o-=- for ō, o\/ for ŏ, etc.
 
Now of course some applications support digraphs or trigraphs.
 
11:58 PM
Autohotkey. Superior.
stamps foot
 
So in my text editor I can simply enter o-
 
What if you want to type the prefix o- ?
 
Autohotkey doesn't do that out of the box. What's needed is for Windows users to have a standard, easy input method out of the box.
The differentiator between o- (literal) and o- (digraph) in my editor is a prefix key.
 
It's easy to make a script that does that in Autohotkey or download it.
 
Easy for you, easy for me. But not preinstalled and not easy for Grandma.
Or whoever that is text literate but not programming literate.
 

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