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8:01 PM
This question could be suitable for Code Review, as long as (a) your code works as intended, (b) your code is real code, rather than example code, and (c) your code is included in the body of the question. If you wish for a peer review to improve all aspects of your code, please post it on Code Review. — Phrancis 50 secs ago
 
Zombie down
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A: Text parsing and calculator (calculate Java heap memory)

Ethan BierleinFirst off, using % for string formatting is deprecated if you're using Python 2.6 or higher. You should be using str.format instead. Here's an example of how you can use str.format. # str.format without positional or named parameters print "{} {}".format("Hello", "world") # str.format with posi...

 
You're killin' it
 
Mhm.
I've earned revival 29 times, and necromancer 10.
 
Wow nice
 
thanks
 
8:10 PM
I finished my question at last
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Q: Plumbing in minimal vi clone

jacwahI am writing a patch for Busybox's implementation of vi, the classical command line code editor and predecessor of vim. It can open up a files through filenames given as command line arguments. My patch allows initial text to be loaded in to the buffer through a pipe on standard input too. # nor...

Is there a tag for optimising executable size?
 
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Q: Plumbing in minimal vi clone

jacwahI am writing a patch for Busybox's implementation of vi, the classical command line code editor and predecessor of vim. It can open up a files through filenames given as command line arguments. My patch allows initial text to be loaded in to the buffer through a pipe on standard input too. # nor...

 
@EthanBierlein eyesore is maybe a too strong word..
> Variable names should be long ...
^^ that's a fallacy
 
But not too long
 
just because most short names are crap it doesn't mean names should be long.
the length of the name is not decisive
the clarity in context is
and that is irrespective of length.
 
There. I've edited it.
 
8:24 PM
Please consider this for code reviews. — Giovanni Botta 41 secs ago
 
because if it were we'd write for (int index = 0; index < array_size; index++) {
 
@GiovanniBotta Codereview is for working code only. Broken code is off-topic there. — Ethan Bierlein 19 secs ago
 
I dunno, I sometimes write for loops like that.
 
sure, but only when i isn't sufficient
 
Although, that's usually in Python, when I'm writing something like for index, element in enumerate(my_list):
 
8:26 PM
for (Object el : collection) {
anyways we're digressing and it is a good answer :D
 
Thanks! :)
 
Let me test some code I've made
Monking
Monknight
zombie
NOCE!!!
*NICE!!!
It works!!!
 
Isn't CodeReview a better place to be? — Andreas Niedermair 5 secs ago
 
What I'm testing is something that, when it finds a 'meme', it will add a link to it
If I write, for example, zombie, it will add a link with an explanation of what it means
When you put your mouse over it, it will show a description
When you click it, it will go to the meta page with all the explanations
 
95% of the time when we mention the memes, we do it to people that already know about it though
 
8:38 PM
I don't
And it's hard to remember
 
Just give it some time :)
 
You mean, 5 years?
I play Tera for almost 4, and can't remember most acronyms
 
URGH, I hate πάντα ῥεῖ!!!
 
8:53 PM
@Duga Yay linked lists!
 
@Duga What is that, the third question today?
I sense another invasion approaching...
 
Right, they should be forbidden. I guess, I review one now...
 
What's a linked list?
 
Is there such thing as an "arbitary linked list"?
Where each element points to an an arbitrary element in the list.
 
9:05 PM
@SirPython Still dont get it
 
Bascially, element A of an array has a property that points to the next element in the array/list. Optionally, element A will also contain a property that points to the previous element in the array/list; this is called doubly linked.
 
@IsmaelMiguel Each element in a linked list contains an index reference to the next element, and (optionally) the previous element.
 
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Q: cython optimize string concatenation

NicholasCould you please advise on a better cytonization of the following method: def make_key( items, is_t_or_f ): codes = ( '', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd' ) zcodes = ( '', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', '11' ) zeros = 0 ss = is_t_or_f for i in range(13): ...

 
That makes more sense
Thanks a lot for the explanation
Finally I understood something!
4
Cue the music!
(Hope I spelled it right)
Oh, that star was evil
 
question coming your way in 3
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Q: Popular questions by view count

Ethan BierleinI made this query to create a graph of a user's popular questions, and the view count on that question. It allows for a minimum of 500 views, and a score of 3. DECLARE @allowed_min_views INT = 500; DECLARE @allowed_min_score INT = 3; DECLARE @user_id INT = ##UserId:int?-1##; DECLARE @min_views ...

Hey @Hosch250
 
9:11 PM
Hi.
So, the C# XML serializer is a doubly linked list because in each element, there is a Next and Previous method (property?) that I can use to get the next element?
 
@EthanBierlein I can't seem to get any rows from the query
 
@jacwah What input have you entered?
 
UserId = -1?
 
@EthanBierlein 64958 which is the number in the link to my profile
 
@jacwah Then you probably don't have any questions that fit the conditions.
 
9:14 PM
User ID -1 is the "Community" pseudo-user.
 
@Hosch250 Yes. I couldn't think of a better default value.
 
92
Q: Who is the Community user?

jjnguyI see this Community user on the user page. It also seems to edit posts sometimes. What is it? And why has it downvoted over 1800 times? Related What are “Community Wiki” posts? Return to FAQ Index

 
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Q: Popular questions by view count

Ethan BierleinI made this query to create a graph of a user's popular questions, and the view count on that question. It allows for a minimum of 500 views, and a score of 3. DECLARE @allowed_min_views INT = 500; DECLARE @allowed_min_score INT = 3; DECLARE @user_id INT = ##UserId:int?-1##; DECLARE @min_views ...

 
@jacwah You don't have any questions viewed 500+ times.
 
@Hosch250 Didn't realise
 
9:21 PM
@EthanBierlein Looks pretty good to me.
 
@Hosch250 Thanks! :)
 
I'm 11/50 of the way to refiner.
 
9:58 PM
I am going to be working on a GPS/Location/Map based library which will probably eventually be open-source. I need a good name for the library. The name also has to have a good abbreviation....
 
What will the library do?
 
Make using a pair of Apple's libraries easier.
Most use-cases of Apple's map library (MapKit) also require using their location library, Core Location.
So, as a start, the library is a combination and simplification of these two libraries (to account for some of the most common use-cases).
And then, I'll be adding some functions I've had to write by hand which do things like center a map over a point, or over an array of points.
 
Make some word play on locus and locust
 
These things can be done. You just have to specify quite a few things in MapKit. It's good because it's flexible...
 
And have a mascot
 
10:04 PM
... but typically, in a given app, you pretty much want most of those settings the same (same zoom level, but different points, for example).
 
A cute insect
 
Also, Apple's CoreLocation library is half-singleton, half-not... and the half that's not actually is under the covers... some of its behaviors are less than obvious... so the library will make the behavior more expected.
 
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Q: Class modelling for a shogi notation reader

SebasSBMI have made a GPL software in GitHub which purpose is reading shogi notations (shogi is japanese chess). I have been told that my software modelling is underdeveloped in this question and adviced to post a question about the classes I made to manage the board, so here I go: The project is public...

 
Just for reference, the backlink: codereview.stackexchange.com/q/96516/41175 . It might be interesting to have the JIT assembler code (and the JVM/target system - as discussed in the linked Q/A, the emitted assembler code depends on whether it's a 32/64bit system). BTW: In one case, the divisor is a long, and in the other case it's an int (just mentioning it - it may or may not be relevant...) — Marco13 50 secs ago
 
10:20 PM
 
10:32 PM
Sorry, cant get any good name
 
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Q: Project Euler #55 - Lychrel numbers

Joe Wallis If we take 47, reverse and add, 47 + 74 = 121, which is palindromic. Not all numbers produce palindromes so quickly. For example, 349 + 943 = 1292, 1292 + 2921 = 4213 4213 + 3124 = 7337 That is, 349 took three iterations to arrive at a palindrome. Although no one has pr...

 
How tall is your monitor? — nhgrif 22 secs ago
 
@nhgrif lmao
 
@nhgrif what...
 
10:49 PM
32 inches, why. — redoc01 5 mins ago
 
@Phrancis ....why me? lol
 
@danh A million thank yous (and some incoming upvotes) upon you. (I was in the middle of making a similar edit too) — nhgrif 12 secs ago
 
@Mat'sMug Don't blame me, Mr. Popular; it's Ethan's sample data :)
Yay, just hit 7K :D
 
@Phrancis I guess having 90-some questions asked does that :-)
 
As soon as you get this code working, I highly recommend you post it to Code Review where people will shorter monitors will help you learn how to organize your code better. — nhgrif 52 secs ago
 
10:59 PM
@Phrancis Congrats!
 
Hi, @nhgrif, I found an answer of yours on The Workplace about reporting software bugs.
Lined up with exactly what I was thinking, only better because I don't have any work experience to cite.
 
11:51 PM
Wow, this chat is dead :/
 
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Q: Simple Morse code interpreter

Ben SimaThis is a simple Morse code interpreter with a CLI. It's a naive table-lookup implementation, and uses my-py for type checking. It automatically detects the input (English or Morse) and converts accordingly. It has the simplest possible CLI that I could think of. There is a git repo here. I don'...

 
@IsmaelMiguel We're all enjoying our Sunday writing code!
 
I'm writting code, chatting, playing Tera and listening to music at the same time
 

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