« first day (782 days earlier)      last day (34 days later) » 

5:07 AM
In the $n!+1=m^2$ problem, $m$ always needs to be odd right?
 
6:04 AM
@Mathphile ya
 
@Haran if it is true that $n!+1=m^2$ only has solutions for $n=4, 5, 7$, can we prove that $n!/k^2+1=m^2$ has no solutions?
Proving this would help to partially answer this question
14
Q: For any $k \gt 1$, if $n!+k$ is a square then will $n \le k$ always be true?

MathphileIn Dabrowski's paper, he showed that it would follow from the abc conjecture that the equation $$n!+k=m^2$$ has a finite number of solutions $n, m$ for any given $k$ which was my motivation to find solutions for different values of $k$. Using PARI/GP, I observed that for any $k \gt 1$, if $n!+k$...

 
@Mathphile Not sure, lemme think
 
Sure
This problem is one that I really want to see a proof of
 
 
2 hours later…
7:56 AM
@MartinHopf If $m$ is a large number and $n$ a number much larger than $m$, then the probability that $n$ is prime , if it has no prime factor below $m$ is about $$\frac{1.78\cdot \ln(m)}{\ln(n)}$$
 
 
1 hour later…
8:59 AM
@Peter It's obvious that it's means. I edited the starting post for you. Also, see please better attempts of the topic-starter. — Michael Rozenberg 10 mins ago
Could anyone counter this comment , please ?
 
9:33 AM
@Peter If $ m=\sqrt{n} $ it is obvious that the probability that $n$ is prime is $ \frac {2 \log(m)}{\log(n)}=1 $. If $m \ll \sqrt{n} $ where do you get the constant $1.78$ from?
 
The probabity that a large number has no prime factor below $m$ , if $m$ is itself large , is $$\frac{e^{\gamma}}{\ln(m)$$ This is the approximation of $(1-1/2)(1-1/3)(1-1/5)\cdots$ where the denominators run over the primes upto $m$
 
@Peter That is indeed an interesting fact.
 
9:48 AM
Sorry, I had a phone call and could not edit the formula , it is $$\frac{e^{-\gamma}}{\ln(m)}$$
Much larger in this context (the $n$ above) means $m^3$ or more
If $m^2\approx n$, we need the Buchstab-function (see $y$- rough numbers)
So, trial division upto $\ln(n)$ increases the chance that $n$ is prime by a significant factor (for $10^{1000}$ the factor is about $14$) , but the chance still is very small to have a prime number.
 
 
2 hours later…
11:38 AM
New project : if $$f(n):=lcm([1,2,3,\cdots,n])$$ Which $n$ after $47$ is the next such that $f(n)\pm1$ is a prime-twin ?
Duplicates are ignored.
Output so far :
gp > z=prod(j=1,3*10^4,prime(j));s=1;merk=1;for(m=1,10^5,s=lcm(s,m);if(s>merk,merk=s;if(gcd(z,s^2-1)==1,if(ispseudoprime(s-1)==1,print(m," - ");if(ispseudoprime(s+1)==1,print(" + "))))))
19 -
+
47 -
+
61 -
97 -
233 -
401 -
1481 -
5407 -
5857 -
14281 -
 
 
2 hours later…
1:26 PM
27277 -
 
hello
I have developed a method to find a real root of a cubic from any quadratic equation that has real roots, nonzero coefficients, and a leading coefficient of 1.
e.g. from the quadratic equation $y^2+7y+3=0$ I was able to show that a root of $x^3+6x^2+\frac 32(15-\sqrt{37})x+11$ is $$\sqrt[3]{\bigg(\frac{7-\sqrt{37}}2\bigg)^2}-\sqrt[3]{\frac{7-\sqrt{37}}2}-2$$
as you can see, in this example, the discovered root takes a very elegant form. Along this method of mine, the root of the cubic will always be of this form.
actually, the quadratic equation doesn't even need a leading coefficient of 1 lmao
 
1:45 PM
@MrPie Interesting !
 
Indeed! I'm very thrilled! :D
@Peter give me any quadratic equation (with a positive discriminant) and I'll try and apply my method. if it works, i'll share it haha
 
Hm , lets take $5x^2-11x-19=0$
 
1:59 PM
ok i'm gonna need Wolfram Alpha the numbers are too big lmao
@Peter ok i have got it
The positive root of your polynomial is $\cfrac{11+\sqrt{501}}{10}$
And: $\sqrt[3]{\bigg(\cfrac{11+\sqrt{501}}{10}\bigg)^2}+\sqrt[3]{\cfrac{11+\sqrt{501}}{10}}+\cfrac{16}{15}$ is a root of the following cubic:
$$x^3-\cfrac{48}{15}x^2-\cfrac 1{10}\bigg(3\sqrt{501}-\cfrac{17}{15}\bigg)x-\cfrac{16921}{15^3}=0$$
it works!
(and no, I didn't just plug in that root in wolfram alpha and ask for a polynomial with that root - i only used wolfram alpha to work out the coefficients by my method quickly. Given a little bit more time, I could have derived this all by hand and much less tediously than the normal cubic formula.)
 
2:57 PM
After our morning conversation i got quite inspired and started thinking about the distribution of primes within the Fermat numbers.
A random number of the order of magnitude $F_n=2^{2^{n}}+1$ has probability $\ln(F_n)^{-1}$ to be prime.
If we consider that factors of Fermat numbers are of the form $ k\cdot 2^{n+2}+1$ then we can significantly
increase the probability for Fermat numbers:
$$\large \frac{C \ln \left(k \cdot 2^{n+2}\right)}{2^n \ln(2)}$$.
Where C is a constant, which for $k \ll \sqrt{F_n}$ approximates Peter's number: $e^{\gamma}=1.78107...$
sorry, forget the first post all is doubled? I repost
After our morning conversation i got quite inspired and started thinking about the distribution of primes within the Fermat numbers.
A random number of the order of magnitude $F_n=2^{2^{n}}+1$ has probability $\ln(F_n)^{-1}$ to be prime.
If we consider that factors of Fermat numbers are of the form $ k\cdot 2^{n+2}+1$ then we can significantly
increase the probability for Fermat numbers:
$$\large \frac{C \ln \left(k \cdot 2^{n+2}\right)}{2^n \ln(2)}$$.
Where $C$ is a constant, which for $k \ll \sqrt{F_n}$ approximates Peter's number: $e^{\gamma}=1.78107...$
 
@MartinHopf The Fermat numbers (also the generalized ones) grow awfully quickly. It is conjectured that for every even base $b$ , only finite many of $b^{2^n}+1$ are prime. Upto exponent $20$ , a large range for the base has been tested, the very small can easily be checked. The smallest undecedided case of the "usual" Fermat numbers is $F_{33}$, an awfully big number !
2
See here for a great news : A very large Fermat factor has been found !!
 
@Peter Ja, aber die erkenntnis ist doch, dass die primzahldichte für Fermatzahlen $F_n$ ist in etwa $\exp{\gamma} \ln \left(k \cdot 2^{n+2}\right)$ mal höher ist als für gewöhnliche Zahlen.
Sorry Deepl was wrong....
Yes, but the realization is that the density of prime numbers for Fermat numbers $F_n$ is about $\exp{\gamma} \ln \left(k \cdot 2^{n+2}\right)$ times higher than for ordinary numbers.
 
3:14 PM
Yes, but the ln of a Fermat number $F_n$ is (a bit larger than) $2^n\cdot \ln(2)$ , so much larger
 
@Peter Great, a real megaprime !
 
By the way, if you are german , you can also chat in german. I am from germany! A smaller factor is not possible, right ? Hence, this number must be prime !
The factor , of course , not the fermat number !
 
That is right!
 
A moment, a smaller factor would be possible, but it would be larger than the found factor. Hence still the factor must be prime !
 
hmm
Ich bin definitiv interessiert
 
3:20 PM
@MrPie Ich bin definitiv intereßiert :P
 
yeah, google translate is unreliable...
 
I was joking
 
oh
 
In German ß makes an ss sound
 
OK, also die Tatsache, dass die Faktoren die Form $k \cdot 2^{n+2}$ haben, erhöht natürlich die Chance auf eine Primzahl, wie stark, ist schwer zu sagen.
 
3:21 PM
I use DeepL for tranlate, it is a bit better.
 
i like the $b^{2^n}+1$ conjecture
 
Sind hier nur deutsche?
 
Ich las jedoch von einer gründlichen Analyse , die ergab , das die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer weiteren Fermatprimzahl höchstens $1 : 10^9$ beträgt.
Die Versuchsdivision bis $2^{35}$ (die man sich schenken kann) bringt also keinen großen Effekt für $F_{33}$
Ich habe es nicht genau nachgerechnet, jedenfalls ist der Logarithmus von $F_n$ drastisch höher als der von dem kleinstmöglichen Faktor.
Dennoch kann man unendlich viele Fermatprimzahlen nicht ausschließen, es spricht aber alles für sehr wenige, vielleicht keine weiteren.
 
@TheSimpliFire btw, i think i have found a method to relate quadratics and cubics. more specifically, if I have a function $g(x)=ax^2+bx+c$ and a cubic $h(x)=x^3+dx^2+ex+f$ where $x_g$ is a root of $g$, I believe I can determine the values of $d,e,f$ such that $\sqrt[3]{x_g^2}+\sqrt[3]{x_g}-1/3(-1+b/a)$ is a root of $h$.
where $d$ and $f$ are always rational numbers, and $e$ is an algebraic number expressed with a radical.
 
Das wäre schon lustig, wenn man bedenkt , daß Fermat vermutete , daß alle Fermatzahlen prim seien. Er hat aber offenbar nicht sehr tief geschürft, vor allem wenn er das Eulerkriterium gekannt haben sollte (was ich nicht so recht glauben kann).
 
3:33 PM
@MrPie Nice
I guess can write $\sqrt[3]{x_g^2}+\sqrt[3]{x_g}=\sqrt[3]{-b/ax_g-c/a}+\sqrt[3]{x_g}$ as a start to linearise
 
@Peter Ich glaube er hat das Kriterium nicht gekannt, obwohl das in der Englischen Wiki so dargestellt wird. Fermat war halt auch nicht so genial wie Euler.
 
An example: consider the quadratic $x^2-x-1=0$ and the root $\varphi$. From this I can show by hand that $\sqrt[3]{\varphi^2}+\sqrt[3]{\varphi}+\frac 23$ is a root of $$x^3-2x^2-\frac{1+9\sqrt 5}6x-\frac{35}{27}$$
 
Naja, soweit würde ich jetzt auch nicht gehen, aber hätte er das Kriterium gekannt, hätte er wohl den Faktor 641 gefunden, so faul wäre er wohl doch nicht gewesen.
 
Geanu
*Genau
 
@TheSimpliFire wdym by linearise?
 
3:40 PM
Ich frage mich, ob PFGW order factordb einen Befehl unterstützen, der $lcm([1,2,3,\cdots n])$ ermitteln kann. Mein PARI/GP Suchprogramm bis $10^5$ hat als größten Primzahlzwilling um diese Zahl herum $n=47$ gefunden. Der aktuelle output ist :
gp > z=prod(j=1,3*10^4,prime(j));s=1;merk=1;for(m=1,10^5,s=lcm(s,m);if(s>merk,merk=s;if(gcd(z,s^2-1)==1,if(ispseudoprime(s-1)==1,print(m," - ");if(ispseudoprime(s+1)==1,print(" + "))))))
19 -
+
47 -
+
61 -
97 -
233 -
401 -
1481 -
5407 -
5857 -
14281 -
27277 -
36497 -
Das Programm läuft noch ...
 
@MrPie Removing the quadratic x_g^2
 
Da Duplikate auftreten, beschloß ich, diese nicht zu zählen.
 
@TheSimpliFire ah. that means by $-b/ax_g$ you mean $(-b/a)x_g$ right?
 
well, the "method" is summarised by one equation: for all $\{a,b,x,y\}$, if $$y^2+(3b+1)y-(b^3-a)=x^3+3bx^2+3(b^2-y)x+a$$ then $x=\sqrt[3]{y^2}+\sqrt[3]y-b$.
(the reason I have the variables in odd places is due to how i derived it.) but from this formula, setting 0 to both sides, i can easily deduce the root of a cubic from any quadratic equation where the root of the cubic always obeys that form of $x$.
 
3:48 PM
I see
 
@MrPie I think it's the case of a cubic equation. For $x^{3}-3mx-m\left(m+1\right)$
$x=\sqrt[3]{m^{2}}+\sqrt[3]{m}$
Simple identity
 
I didn't know that
 
Then let m be the quadratic root, and you can get that result
 
I just looked at the massive cubic formula for $ax^3+bx^2+cx+d$. Cardano applied substitutions to reduce it to the form $x^3+px+q$, but instead I applied a substitution to $d$ which simplified things tremendously. Once I found it, I was able to derive all sorts of things, this theorem included.
 
@Mourad How are you so quick to recall these identities?
 
3:53 PM
lol
 
Btw I've been thinking about this for the past hours
14
Q: Which convex shapes are the hardest to bind together with a rubber band?

RavenclawPrefectSuppose I have a convex set $S\subset \mathbb{R}^2$ of unit area. In fact, I have two congruent copies of $S$ which I would like to bundle together with a rubber band, i.e. take the convex hull $C$ of a disjoint union of these two copies. Assuming I do this in an area-minimizing way, what is the ...

 
@TheSimpliFire Sort of cuz of the circumstance, I was interested in deriving the cubic formula lately.
 
4:09 PM
How many Fermat primes are there now? Here is my answer:
$$\large e^{\gamma} \sum_{n=0}^{\infty} \frac{n+2}{2^n}\ \ =\ \ 6 \cdot e^{\gamma} \ \ = 10.686...$$
So, there are about $5$ Fermat primes that we do not know yet. That is encouraging, isn't it?
 
In fact, we have to start at $n=33$ , since all fermat numbers from $F_5$ to $F_{32}$ are known to be composite. Which is the number then ?
Maybe, the chance is a bit higher since many larger prime factors are ruled out as well, but I think this has been considered in the deep search that was made.
Moreover, only the few next possible fermat primes are (perhaps) small enough for a primality test. Already $F_{33}$ is a huge task. Maybe, somewhere runs a calculation of this super-number, I do not know.
@MartinHopf Maybe, your Erdoes-program is of use for my conjecture that a multiple of $k>2$ can be a Carmichael number, whenever $\gcd(\varphi(k),k)=1$ holds. Could you check the conjecture with that routine for, lets say , the $k$'s upto $10^6$ with this property ?
 
4:28 PM
@Peter Yes, I needed about 26 days to prove $10^{2^{25}}+1$ composite. For proving $F_{33}$ at least 18 years of computation is needed. That is too much.
 
Wie ist damit der Status ? Welches ist die kleinste mögliche Primzahl der Form $10^n+1$ größer als $101$ ?
 
@Peter $n=31$ ist die kleinste.
 
Im Übrigen, vielen Dank für deine Geduld !
So $$10^{10^{31}}+1$$ ich nehme an mit unbekanntem Status , nicht wahr ?
 
@Peter Ich danke dir für die Inspirationen :)
@Peter Richtig
 
Ich habe noch jede Menge weiterer Projekte, falls du den Rechner zum Glühen brigen willst. z.B. ist immer noch kein Faktor von $$2^{2^{2^2}}+3^{3^{3^3}}$$ bekannt ! Außerdem suche ich auch den kleinsten Primfaktor von $$\lfloor exp(exp(exp(exp(1)))) \rfloor$$
 
4:36 PM
@Peter Der Erdoes Algo braucht einen Startvektor als Input, hmm das wird schwierig.
 
Nimm einfach eine sehr große hochzusammengesetzte Zahl, das sollte für die meisten Fälle klappen.
 
@Peter Trial division! Ich wünschte ich könnte die beschleunigen.
Du hast den Code. Spiel ruhig damit rum.
 
Das ist ein wichtiges, aber noch nicht zufriedenstellend gelöstes Problem. Außer die Faktoren habe eine gewisse Gestalt.
Im Moment suche ich noch nach "$lcm(1,2,3,\cdots n)$-Primzahlzwillingen"
Aber das Carmichaelproblem kannst du angehen mit Erdoes !
Nach meinen Berechnungen gibt es zumindest bis $k=2\ 000$ eine Lösung.
Wie schnell findet er eigentlich eine Lösung für ein passendes $k$ ?
Oh, ich sehe gerade meinen Fehler in obigem Ausdruck ! Es soll natürlich $$10^{2^{31}}+1$$ heißen !
 
Ja, das ist kein problem ich hab es shon gemerkt.
 
Eine Primzahl der Form $10^n+1$ größer als $101$ würde also den bisherigen Rekord pulverisieren.
OK , also wie schnell fand der Erdoes-Algorithmus die Lösung für $k=885$ ?
 
4:47 PM
Ja, es wäre die grösste von allen. N-1 Test zur Basis 3.
 
Kann man den "Pepin-Test" auch hier anwenden ?
 
@Peter Es is nicht deterministisch. 5 min würde ich sagen.
 
Oha, zuviel um bis $10^6$ zu kommen ...
Ich dachte, er würde eine Lösung quasi instantan finden.
 
@Peter Ja, der Pepin Test benutzt die Basis 3. und 3 ist coprim zur Basis 10.
 
War da nicht noch irgendwas mit einem quadratischen Rest bei Pepin, der garantiert , das man eine Primzahl gefunden hat ?
Was jedoch sowieso bei so großen Zahlen nicht zu erwarten ist.
Ich habe mein Programm mal abgebrochen.
gp > z=prod(j=1,3*10^4,prime(j));s=1;merk=1;for(m=1,10^5,s=lcm(s,m);if(s>merk,merk=s;if(gcd(z,s^2-1)==1,if(ispseudoprime(s-1)==1,print(m," - ");if(ispseudoprime(s+1)==1,print(" + "))))))
19 -
+
47 -
+
61 -
97 -
233 -
401 -
1481 -
5407 -
5857 -
14281 -
27277 -
36497 -
*** at top-level: ...=s;if(gcd(z,s^2-1)==1,if(ispseudoprime(s-1)==1
*** ^---------------------
*** ispseudoprime: user interrupt after 5h, 13min, 3,329 ms
gp >
Ein Zwilling jjenseits von $n=47$ dürfte schwer zu finden sein.
 
4:59 PM
(F-1)/2 und der quadratische Rest ist -1 und durch quadriern folgt Rest 1 für (F-1) das ist das Kriterion für Prim
 
Ich glaube, wenigestens für den Fall von 3 Primfaktoren gezeigt zu haben, daß es nur endlich viele Carmichaelzahlen mit einem gegebenen Primfaktor geben kann. Allerdings ist die obere Schranke nicht sehr effektiv !
 
Ja, das sehe ich genauso!
Ich muss nun afk für heute wir sehen uns morgen wieder. Bis dann
 
Den Fall $p=1223$ habe ich noch immer nicht endgültig gelöst. Es sollte aber keine Lösung mit 3 Primfaktoren geben.
 
Ich arbeite daran. Bis morgen
 
OK , bis dann ...
Uhrzeit ?
 

« first day (782 days earlier)      last day (34 days later) »