« first day (1120 days earlier)      last day (2593 days later) » 

5:25 AM
Oh, Iron Man in Japanese anime!
 
@DamkerngT. Haven't seen it, but I've heard it's pretty bad (at least compared to the Hollywood movies, though I guess that goes without saying).
 
Ahh
I found it on my suggested list when I listened to "Let It Go" (Japanese version) from Frozen.
 
Anonymous
I liked Frozen :-)
 
Anonymous
Have you seen おおかみこどもの雨と雪?
 
Oh, I missed that one.
It was on my cable TV once. I wanted to watch it, but I was busy with something else. :)
It looks like a decent, well-made, and heart-touching anime.
 
 
2 hours later…
Anonymous
7:15 AM
It was good.
 
1:41 PM
@snailboat へえ、副詞よりも、連体詞のほうが、メインなのね・・・
ほんの少し~、ほんのちょっと~、ほんのちょっぴり~、ほんの短い~、ほんの小さな~、ほんのわずかな~、ほんのしばらく~、ほんの1ミリ~、ほんの一口、 とか。名詞に‌​もつくし、形容詞にもつくよね
副詞にもついてるのかな?
「しばらく」とか「ちょっぴり」とか、副詞みたいね
 
2:15 PM
I've started playing a puzzle game on my phone called 脱出アリス. You play as Alice (the one from wonderland) and chase a rabbit down a hole. The game plays very much like another game called 100 floors. Except that it's in Japanese and the hints are in Japanese.
I found it rather satisfying to be able to use Japanese to play this game. I'm sharing this because the dialogues in there aren't too long and should be reasonably easy to follow, and should be fun for Japanese learners to have something to apply their knowledge on.
 
 
1 hour later…
ssb
3:45 PM
餔 - ゆうめし. It has its own kanji!
But the other めし words don't... at least not that my IME will tell me
 
 
2 hours later…
Anonymous
6:15 PM
@Damkerng There's a little flashcardy thing here: realkana.com
 
Anonymous
I don't know what makes it real :-)
 
Anonymous
How is the practice with listening to songs going?
 
6:55 PM
@snailboat I don't know. Is it real? :)
@snailboat Slowly, but steadily. I can identify several potential listening problems. The most important one is perhaps the confusion of /r/-/d/. The next one is /sh/-/ch/-/j/ (also tangled with /tsu/ which sometimes sounds like /tju/ for me). Also, /n/-/t/-/d/, and sometimes tangled with /k/-/g/. (Isn't it strange that I heard /n/ as /g/ somteimes?!) Most of these can be solved easily from context clues, I think, but I wish I could hear those sounds clearer than I can.
 
I think when you start taking in the context with less effort, the sounds will just fall in place.. the brain just kinda works like that. :p I remember having similar issues. (still have to some degree, I don't use my hard earned japanese skills nearly as much as I should..)
I picked up "death note" last weekend.. it's kinda emo. It was that or Naruto though. Those were the ones I recognized.
And it's way harder than I thought it would be. I mean I can read it and get it, (with a dictionary by my side) but still there's bubbles on every other page where I don't really get why they're forming their sentences a certain way and it makes me think I'm missing something. :/
 
@gibbon Thanks for the cheering up! Japanese /r/ is quite tricky. (And I know that Japanese /r/ is supposed to sound like that, but it still got me sometimes. :)
Death Note as manga, anime, or a movie?
 
7:12 PM
There's movies? Anyway, manga. I wanted to practice reading something.
 
(I've watched one of its movies once. Not in Japanese, of course. :)
 
At the very least, I've noticed this format (manga) is excellent for battling those occasional 10 minute build times at work. :P No more getting frustrated with comments on reddit/hacker news.
 
LOL
Manga are fun to read.
 
Yeah it's not so bad.. Isn't the anime version of all these series more popular though?
 
Most of these series are usually released as manga first and then anime, I think.
If it's popular, it will have a very good chance to become an anime.
Looking at the number of manga and anime released each year, it's so amazing!
I really have no idea how they do it!
 
7:24 PM
Lots of people and long working hours? I reluctantly watched an ep of One Piece once, I think heavy drugs may play a part in the creative process.
 
Haha!
Imo, One Piece is unlike others. Very funky. :)
 
Anonymous
@DamkerngT. It's natural for speakers of American English to mix up Japanese /r/ and /d/, because in American English the alveolar flap is an allophone of /d/ (and /t/), as in water
 
Anonymous
And that flap is fairly similar to the Japanese /r/ (though not the same)
 
Anonymous
Similar enough that they're often written with the same symbol in IPA, [ɾ]
 
I have no idea what you just said, but you mean americans pronounce water as wah-der?
 
Anonymous
7:30 PM
Yes, I'm describing the same thing you are
 
Sometimes I thought I heard /du/, and then thought, "wait a minute, Japanese has no /du/, it must be /ru/". :)
 
Anonymous
@DamkerngT. Occasionally you'll hear it in loanwords, written in katakana as ドゥ
 
Anonymous
But it's not a usual sound in Japanese
 
Anonymous
@DamkerngT. It isn't that strange that you'd hear /n/ as /g/ sometimes. Remember that /g/ has the velar nasal allophone [ŋ].
 
Anonymous
"ng"
 
7:37 PM
I think it can happen even when the /g/ doesn't sound really like [ŋ].
 
Anonymous
Well, what I mean is that the crossover between those categories means that they might not be entirely distinct in your brain yet
 
Anonymous
But if you do listening practice it'll get easier :-)
 
Looking at the series of my confusion patterns: /n/-/t/-/d/, and sometimes with /k/-/g/ too. I guess that the short onset is the cause of the problem.
 
Anonymous
I'm not talking about specifically mishearing the velar nasal
 
Most of the times, it's relatively easy to tell which one is which. But some of them are really confusing.
 
Anonymous
7:39 PM
Your brain has to sort the sounds it hears into phonemic buckets
 
Anonymous
It has a bunch of tools to help it do that
 
Anonymous
@Choko Ah, I was saying it can modify 副詞 because that's what 岩波国語辞典 said: 「ほんの少し」「ほんの時折」のように副詞を修飾することがある。
 
> *kimitonatsunowani shonainoyume
Kimi to natsu no owari shourai no yume

*okinakibowowatsudenai
Ooki na kibou wasurenai

*jubunengotohajikatsuma nanenaedomochinchite
Juunengo no hachigatsu Mata deaeru no wo shinjite

*saikowono homoitewo
Saikou no omoide wo
I think you might find it interesting (to see the confusion patterns of a specific learner.) :)
 
Anonymous
Oh, mixing up /r/ and /n/!
 
Isn't it strange?!
 
Anonymous
7:44 PM
I've made all sorts of mistakes :-)
 
Anonymous
Is this in a song?
 
Anonymous
Oh, it's the あの花 ED theme
 
Yes, it's from yesterday.
 
Anonymous
Yes, when she sings saikowo, that /w/ isn't phonemic, she's just singing さいこう and inserting a /w/
 
Anonymous
/saikoʜ/
 
Anonymous
7:46 PM
I like this new little ʜ thing :-) Earthliŋ here convinced me to start using it
 
Anonymous
It might take time to get used to the voicing contrast in Japanese, since it's different phonetically than English or Thai
 
Anonymous
But I think you're doing pretty well :-)
 
nods -- The onsets seem to be very different.
Thanks!
 
Anonymous
It'll help if you can start to recognize some words
 
I can recognize some words in the song now. :)
 
Anonymous
7:49 PM
Yay!
 
Anonymous
Do you know what some of them mean? :-)
 
The ones I can recognize are those I had looked them up. :)
 
Anonymous
Yay
 
Anonymous
Which dictionary are you using?
 
The one that comes with my coursebook.
It's in Romaji-English and English-Romaji.
But I can read hiragana, so looking them up as romaji is not too difficult.
 
Anonymous
7:51 PM
Oh! Don't you have the Progressive dictionary?
 
I have it, but it's too thick to look up the words quickly.
 
Anonymous
Oh, don't forget you can use a computer, too :-)
 
At this point, I try to understand the meaning only approximately.
For example, in 将来の夢, 将来 ~ future, 夢 ~ dream, but one translation on the web translates it as "never forget".
> 君と夏の終わり 将来の夢 --> I'll never forget being with you at the end of summer
Btw, my dictionary says 君 (きみ) is colloquial.
 
8:10 PM
おやすみ!
~ <-- (waving)
 
Anonymous
@DamkerngT. 君 is used more often in fiction than in real life
 
Anonymous
@DamkerngT. The translation, such as it is, is taking into account more than just those two noun phrases (which do not make up a complete sentence)
 
Anonymous
@DamkerngT. 「君と夏の終わり 将来の夢 大きな希望 忘れない」
 
9:01 PM
@snailboat Hey you around?
@DamkerngT. Hi there! :)
 
Anonymous
@WendiKidd Hello! :-)
 
9:18 PM
@snailboat Hi! So I'm going crazy on Amazon trying to find a good brand for that brush pen
Is that one any good?
Or do you know what kind they used in the video? Cause really I want that one xD The reviews aren't helpful.... They're mixed for every one I look at. Some people love it, some people hate it...
I can't find a brand that doesn't have mixed reviews
 
Anonymous
9:41 PM
@WendiKidd I don't know what kind they used in the video :-( The Pentel one is the most common one most people get I think
 
Anonymous
 
Anonymous
They're using a Pentel brush pen in that video, specifically this one
 
@snailboat Do you have any examples? I can't come up with any.
@snailboat Depends on how you analyze them.
 
Anonymous
@EiríkrÚtlendi Did you see the dictionary definition I quoted from 岩波? 「ほんの時折」
 
9:46 PM
Is it [ほんの [短い間]], or [[ほんの短い] 間]?
 
Anonymous
Well, that's what I asked you :-)
 
@snailboat Missed that. Scrolling through...
heh
 
Anonymous
Take a look at Choko's examples for ほんの too
 
Anonymous
8 hours ago, by Choko
ほんの少し~、ほんのちょっと~、ほんのちょっぴり~、ほんの短い~、ほんの小さな~、ほんのわずかな~、ほんのしばらく~、ほんの1ミリ~、ほんの一口、 とか。名詞に‌​もつくし、形容詞にもつくよね
 
I think 少し and 時折 can take ほんの because of the historical development of these 副詞 from what were originally nouns.
少し still behaves in very noun-like ways
(I'm less familiar with 時折 in everyday usage)
ちょっと etc. are certainly outside the bounds of that
and may reflect an underlying shift in how ほんの
is parsed.
but i'm still unclear if these (ほんの短い, etc.) are regarded as formally accepted analyses,
or if linguists would parse these as [ほんの [adj + noun]] such that the ほんの applies more to the noun than to the interstitial adjective.
 
Anonymous
9:53 PM
@EiríkrÚtlendi Yeah, that's how Martin analyzes it
 
Daijirin lists 本の as a 連体詞
 
Anonymous
Yes, I reported that earlier as one of the 7 dictionaries I checked
 
Shogakukan lists it as a 連体詞, but also as a 連語.
 
Anonymous
> The English translation may sometimes make this seem like an adverb modifying an adjective, but it is actually modifying the entire noun phrase as a unit: ほんの短い時間 'but a brief time', ほんのつまらないもの 'merely a worthless thing'; それから、ほんの間もないことであった 'After that it was only a short time' … Cf. ほんのおしるしですけど 'this is a mere token, but [my thanks go with it]'
 
Anonymous
(Martin, 1975)
 
9:55 PM
presumably that's from Martin
aaha
 
Anonymous
But then, ほんの少し食べる doesn't have a head noun for it to modify, so that argument doesn't work unless you consider 少し simultaneously a head noun and an adverb :-)
 
Anonymous
Well, you could say 少し there is a noun and the entire phrase ほんの少し is acting adverbially, I guess
 
I'd always viewed 少し in that context as a noun.
much as the English, "little bit"
少しは食べたけど。。 etc.
少しもない
granted, は and も can show up between adverbial forms and endings, c.f. 少なくもない etc.
 
Anonymous
Sure, は and も attach to all sorts of constituents
 
but in terms of semantics, 少し often seems very noun-like.
 
Anonymous
10:02 PM
Same thing in ほんのちょっと寝てしまう?
 
it does come across that way.
ちょっと < ちっと < ちと, where ち seems to be the same root as in ちいさい
と working here as the particle
 
Anonymous
10:50 PM
Word of the day: 瑞雲
 

« first day (1120 days earlier)      last day (2593 days later) »