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6:52 AM
@tony No doubt the king's speech was carefully prepared and proofread; still it struck me as quite good. As we are a representative democracy, it is perhaps to be expected and even befitting that our parliamentarians are not all, shall we say, well-read, well-expressed and highly literate people.
My English education was unremarkable (starting in fifth grade). In my humble opinion, my English is slightly better than the average in my generation; but school just laid the foundations - just compare the English and French capabilities of Germans who took both languages in school. Exposure to English literature/media and (in my case) lots of technical documentation makes the difference.
By the way, I was once approached at Venice's S. Lucia train station by a tourist asking me what day of the week it was. When I answered with a single word "Sunday," she immediately replied, "Oh, you're from Germany?" I found that quite sobering ;-)
 
 
4 hours later…
11:21 AM
@Adam That would include me, and I am excited. But I hope it looks promising to you too.
@SebastianKoppehel A single word would befit a Finn well too. We do get mistaken for Germans every so often.
 
 
11 hours later…
9:53 PM
ChatGPT is also confused:
> In the Latin expression "qua re" (or "quare"), "qua" is an adverb. It is a form of the Latin adverb "quo," which means "where," "in what place," or "by what way." "Qua" is the ablative feminine singular form of "quo," and it is used to modify the verb or the adjective that follows it. In the expression "qua re," it means "by what means" or "for what reason," and it modifies the following noun "re," which means "thing" or "matter." So "qua re" together means "why" or "for what reason."
In fairness, it apologized profusely when I expressed the slightest doubt about that answer :D
Oh dear...
> The letter in which Cicero used "Euge" to praise Atticus's speech is from his Epistulae ad Atticum (Letters to Atticus), specifically Book 2, Letter 1.
> In this letter, Cicero wrote to Atticus to express his congratulations and admiration for the eloquence of his speech in the Senate, which had apparently made a strong impression on the audience. Cicero wrote:
> "Euge, Attice, mi frater; belle et ornatè (Bravo, my dear Atticus; it was a beautiful and elegant speech!)."
This is just one example of how Cicero used "Euge" to express his praise and admiration for someone's achievements or accomplishments.
As far as I can tell, this is completely made-up nonsense.
> In his letters, Cicero often addressed Atticus as "frater" or "mi frater" (my brother), "optime frater" (best brother), or "amicus optimus" (best friend), among other terms of endearment. These expressions of friendship and camaraderie show the depth and intimacy of their relationship, despite the fact that they were not biologically related.
I'm going to stop here :o
No, I can't spare you the next response:
> No, Cicero did not address his daughter Tullia as "mi frater" or "frater" in his letters. As I mentioned earlier, the term "frater" was commonly used in ancient Rome to express a close friendship, but it was not used to address family members.
 
 
1 hour later…
cmw
11:21 PM
@SebastianKoppehel This does not compute.
Excellent at parroting speech, the worst at evaluating facts (because it can't do that at all).
@SebastianKoppehel Mi frater never appears in the letters to Atticus.
I remember reading once about a cousin of Cicero's whom he addressed as frater, but I'm a bit fuzzy on the details.
Oh! Actually, found it. Att. 1.5, addressing L. Cicero, his cousin.
Shackleton Bailey has this note: "The children of brothers (fratres patrueles) can be termed simply fratres (sorores)." That's where I read it.
 
11:55 PM
@cmw And of course he calls Quintus frater all the time. I asked GPT about that, and if a brother is not a family member, but it just lectured me about the relationship of the Tullii and constantly apologized "for any confusion I may have caused" or some such.
I also had a pleasant conversation about railroad museums in my region. ChatGPT knew a few and detailed the exhibits to be seen there. They were all either made up from whole cloth or were not railroad museums.
It claimed that DESY (a physics research center) had railway-related exhibits. Upon further inquiry it turned out one of the particle accelerator tunnels had been originally built for a subway. This is also complete nonsense. How does this happen??
 

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