« first day (4170 days earlier)      last day (53 days later) » 

6:06 PM
@amphibient - Hey, something I'll tell you here and not on your question ... depending on the engine and how it was running prior to when you took it apart ... My suggestion to you is, hone the cylinders, check your ring gap, and send it with the new rings and none of the measuring I've mentioned in your question.
If you feel you don't have any appreciable wear on the pistons and the cylinders look in good shape (might still have cross hatch in it from the original hone), I'd have no qualms about sending it.
Just remember, if you hone the cylinders, you really need to do this with the block outside of the vehicle so you can clean it thoroughly. Stone grit really does get everywhere.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:26 PM
@Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 what do you mean "send it"?
I'm also confused "check your ring gap, and send it with the new rings and none of the measuring" -- isn't checking my ring gap a form of measuring?
 
7:40 PM
@Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 the reason I am doing this is mechanics.stackexchange.com/questions/88384/…
also might wanna see the linked questions for added detail -- in short, i am doing this because in the winter, moisture got in when i had the heads off and somehow compromised the pistons/rings so that, when i put the heads back on, all the air pumped into the cylinders was leaking through the crank case (or 95%) of it, meaning i would have no compression. the leak before i took the heads off was something like 10-20% max
 
7:57 PM
@amphibient - "Send it" is a slang term meaning, get it done. Do what you've got to do with the minimal amount of work and get it done. If you weren't experiencing any issues before you took the heads off with piston slap or other weird noises, I would hone the cylinders with the minimal amount needed to break the glaze (probably 5-10 hone cycles ... a cycle meaning one time up and down the cylinder with the hone). Then, check the new piston ring gap to ensure there's enough.
A Haynes manual can tell you what it should be. More than likely, you'll not have any problem, but you still need to check new rings because sometimes things are wrong. Clean the pistons really well. Then put it all back together and call it a day.
 
thanks. I just took all the pistons out. none of the rings (5 per piston) were stuck to the piston and all came off very easily, no tool needed. does that tell you anything?
so i am trying to determine what tools i will need to procure for this minimal effort. do i still need a snap gauge and a large micrometer to measure the piston ring gap ? or can i do it with a digital caliper that i already have
5 rings per piston -- but only 3 grooves. the last 3 rings go in the bottom groove, a ribbed one sandwiched between two skinny straight ones. i think this is a standard setup
 
8:20 PM
@amphibient - You need a hone. You can make due with a straight hone. They are relatively cheap and effective.
You'll need a feeler gage to check the end gaps in the rings and some way to square them in the bore. Putting an old ring in the second slot on the piston and using that is a good way of doing it. You need to check the top, 2nd, and oil control rings. You do not need to check the spacer, which is the ribbed one you talk about.
You'll need a ring installation tool. Very cheap and easy to get. You'll also need a ring compressor. You can get a universal one on Amazon, which comes with a ring expander as a kit for fairly cheap.
Make sure you keep all of your original bearings with the original rods. Ensure the rod caps stay with the same rods then came on.
Put the same piston back in the same hole you got it from.
 
so basically forget the snap gauge and a large micrometer (i have a little one i used to measure my valve tapet spacing) -- just get a hone like this and then the pliers + the copressor ?
definitely i put the bearing back on the same rod as soon as i took each piston out -- and i marked each piston with a paint marker (didn't want to apply pain anywhere on the piston-bore mating surface)
 
@amphibient - Correct.
Also, when you go to put the new rings on the piston, they need to go on a specific way, then they need to be aligned properly on the piston. This is to help prevent blow-by and leakdown.
Clean the pistons really well. Use an old piston ring (broken one) to scrap the ring lands (the gap where the rings sit in the piston). These need to be clean of carbon, or the rings can stick, which can cause issues down the road.
Using the broken ring and some carb or brake cleaner can do a wonderful job ... just make sure you do it in a well ventilated area.
 
how do you mean "go on a specific way"?
can i use a really pointy hole punch to clean the lands?
 
8:36 PM
@amphibient - No. If you do as I'm suggesting, it works perfectly.
Think about it. The width of the ring groove is the same width as the rings themselves. Match made in heaven.
If you're going to replace your rings, break one of the old ones and use it. Best cleaning tool for the grooves there is ... bar none.
@amphibient - Well, when you get your ring pack, each ring has a place. The top ring, 2nd ring, and oil control rings all go in different slots and each gets installed in a different way.
Some rings have a directional requirement. Some might not.
The box the rings come in will tell you which ring is which.
As far as the oil control rings, you put the spacer on first (wavy part) while ensuring the ends match up (do not overlap). Then you put the bottom ring on next. It goes on the bottom side of the spacer and next to the bottom part of the ring land. Put it on one way (ie: counter-clockwise). The top oil control ring goes next. You should install it clockwise. For all of the oil control ring portions (all three pieces), you won't need the ring expander (pair of pliers for installing the rings).
The 2nd ring is next. It may or may not be directional. By "directional" I'm stating, which side of the ring should go up. If it is directional, you'll most likely see a dimple on the ring near the end of it.
Use the ring expander for the 2nd and top rings.
The top ring will go last and it will most likely be directional.
The reason it is directional is, it is beveled in a direction to help it seat/seal when you start the engine for the first time.
While self serving, this video I did should give you some idea of how to check/install the rings:
 
 
3 hours later…
11:24 PM
OK, so by "specific way" you really meant it matters which side of the ring goes up and which side goes down?
 

« first day (4170 days earlier)      last day (53 days later) »