« first day (3475 days earlier)      last day (51 days later) » 

 
1 hour later…
2:12 AM
0
A: Sandbox for Proposed Challenges

Silvio MayoloIs this Chessboard Reachable? The goal of this challenge is to determine, given the state of a chessboard, whether or not that chessboard can actually be reached in the course of standard play. Of course, doing this in general is a rather hard problem, so we'll be simplifying the problem to a set...

 
2:37 AM
0
A: Sandbox for Proposed Challenges

Dannyu NDosIdentify the tonal from a key signature Objective Given a key signature in major, output its tonal. Input An integer from -14 to +14, inclusive. Its absolute value is the numbers of flats/sharps. Negative number represents flats, and positive number represents sharps. Note that theoretical keys a...

 
 
2 hours later…
 
1 hour later…
5:21 AM
0
Q: Find the slope of a line

Raghu RanganathanIntroduction Given the equation of a line, find it's slope. Challenge \$y = mx + c\$ is the general equation of a line. You must find slope \$m\$. The Input will be given in as a string. E.g: "0.3x+0.2y=4" You can take input from stdin, or function parameters, or command line options. You can p...

 
 
4 hours later…
8:59 AM
#finally-got-my-code-golf-silver-badge
Y'all proud?
But I somehow got it twice
 
 
2 hours later…
10:35 AM
@Lyxal Of course.
But one thing that caught my eye when I enter your user page is:
Top tags (69)
"Fun", isn't it?
 
11:04 AM
@HighlyRadioactive nice
 
11:20 AM
@Lyxal LOL Memelord
 
 
2 hours later…
12:51 PM
Digging old 1+ chat messages...
> Seriously I think I need a C++ brute-forcer
> As I don't know Java
Now I have my own.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:59 PM
@Lyxal Facts:
 
0
A: Sandbox for Proposed Challenges

simonalexander2005Road Sort Order In Britain, road identifiers use a scheme of a letter, followed by a 1-4 digit number. From Most-Important to Least-Important, the letters are: M A B C D U The numbers also represent further assumptions around the importance of the road, such that a 1-digit number is more import...

 
1. Lyxal can do Python-only challenges in Keg.
2. Lyxal golfs a program by standing there waiting, and his experienced keyboard & mouse (which learned from his keystrokes) do it for him.
3. Lyxal can refer to memes that predates his message.
4. Lyxal is the code golfer.
 
@HighlyRadioactive Don't you have a room to specially spam about Lyxal?
4
 
5. They said Lyxal made the universe using a bunch of rocks, but no one except Lyxal knows he made a Keg program that makes the universe. Infinity+1 per second.
@cairdcoinheringaahing That one's about 1+...
This is not spam, this is obvious facts
(Don't suspend me again!!
 
@HighlyRadioactive What was the room with the name full of random characters?
 
2:08 PM
@cairdcoinheringaahing It's not random characters it's a perfectly valid 1+ program!
I golfed it quite a bit today
 
@HighlyRadioactive Ok, but that isn't my point. These "facts" really aren't on topic here
 
@HighlyRadioactive Did you write a metagolfer for that? (asking because I'm considering writing one to outgolf all of you)
 
@mypronounismonicareinstate Yes but it is very naive
I'm considering rewriting it using Lyxal technology
Also the room is renamed to the original Increment now because Lyxal feels offended
6. Lyxal hides himself pretty well using his finest magic square. No magic can find him.
 
@HighlyRadioactive Just in case this wasn't clear, I'm asking you to stop spamming please
 
@cairdcoinheringaahing spam spam spam nvm I'll stop
 
2:17 PM
Lyxal should put these on his userpage...
 
Oh hi TPC
I continued on Sandbox actually
 
hello there
bit new here
 
@RaghuRanganathan Hello!
 
whats the dicussion going on now
 
Uh nothing
 
2:21 PM
We defeated HighlyRadioactive
 
I'm posting Chuck Norris Facts except it is processed with /Chuck Norris/Lyxal/
 
ok I don't know what that means
but cool
 
Aka. I'm posting Lyxal Facts except it is processed with /Lyxal/Lyxal/
 
My way of welcoming newbies is go upvote all their answers
 
It's golf or be golfed
 
2:24 PM
Except for those who refused to follow the rules, in that case I will downvote them
 
I'm trying to maketiny programs in Ruby
 
You are making them suffer the problem of serial upvoting.
 
This dude name Dingus has been really helpful
 
67
Q: Tips for golfing in Ruby

grokusWhat general tips can you give for golfing in Ruby? I'm looking for ideas that can be applied to code golf problems in general that are specific to Ruby. (For example, "Remove comments" would not be an answer.) Please post one tip per answer.

 
I got that bookmarked, thanks
 
2:25 PM
@Third-party'Chef' oh ok
that's a way to learn isn't it
Things to note:
Third-party 'Chef' == petStorm == A _
 
I am known for changing usernames. I change my username every single month.
 
oh interesting
 
^^ This HighlyRadioactive dude over here forgot most of my usernames.
 
whats a good golfing language to start with
I see 05AB1E and Jelly everywhere but none of it makes sense
 
2:28 PM
@RaghuRanganathan 05AB1E. Being simple to learn & program, you can easily achieve a high score.
 
@RaghuRanganathan 05AB1E does not make sense????
That's completely false
05AB1E is an awesome language
 
05AB1E does not make sense does not make any sense to me... once you learnt the basics, it would be extremely easy to program in that language!
 
Ok I'll put some time into it
 
@Third-party'Chef' Agreed
See also:
Pyth
Stax
CJam
Tips for golfing in 05AB1E
I'm tempted to create an esolang called "Tips for golfing in 05AB1E" now
 
2:30 PM
@RaghuRanganathan Also 1+
@Third-party'Chef' The one that compresses "Hello, World" poorly?
 
I program in Jelly by rearranging related built-ins until the program does what I want. If I cannot find a permutation that works, I start adding quicks (mostly those with complicated descriptions) in random places. This almost always works.
 
lol you were just talking about 1+ right
 
@RaghuRanganathan wait waht
 
some group name was an executable 1+ program
 
11+1<h r1ght y11+1<u m111++11+"+n th1s 11+1<ne
 
2:33 PM
@my
 
> @cairdcoinheringaahing It's not random characters it's a perfectly valid 1+ program!
 
you edited one of my questions right
 
@HighlyRadioactive Wait, you forgot about Japt
 
No I didn't
@Third-party'Chef' And Keg. How silly I am!!!
 
2:35 PM
and x86 machine code according to your user page
And GolfScript!!
Branchylog!!
 
There's a huge list of them, you can look at this analysis
 
Integral looks cool as hell
 
Burlesque!!!
 
ok too many languages
 
FlogScript!!!
 
2:35 PM
@RaghuRanganathan I haven't edited anything since at least July, I think.
 
Microscript!!!
Jolf!!!
 
Golf but in jeans
 
@RaghuRanganathan Now I really wished I just posted that analysis link. I want to delete all of my messages!
 
I think I found my fave
Shakespeare programming language
 
2:37 PM
@mypronounismonicareinstate (With a lot of extremely golfy newly made golfing languages missing, obviously)
 
@Third-party'Chef' Could you name a few? :)
 
@mypronounismonicareinstate I know Jstx, Convex, RProgN, ... I give up.
 
Convex's last commit is 2 years ago, and it's on LICENSE... The second last commit was made on 14 Aug 2016.
 
(Despite that, it still goes pretty high in isaacg's analysis...)
 
Well, do golfing languages require that much maintenance?
 
2:44 PM
I think that analysis is meaningless because if a language is too hard to create non-trivial programs with, it ranks very high (because it almost always wins because all programs are just a few built-ins) (note: I do not know Convex)
 
@mypronounismonicareinstate Also, it is missing APL, which occasionally wins on very array-oriented or speciality tasks for which it comes with library functions.
 
@RaghuRanganathan The good ones, yes
 
@Adám You said that APL isn't a golfing language. Now you are expecting APL to appear in a golfing language list...
 
interesting
 
There are always new builtins to be added, or bugs to be fixed
4
 
2:48 PM
@Third-party'Chef' No, I'm saying that you're not guaranteed to outgolf everyone if you don't resort to APL when needed.
4
 
> J and APL are not golfing languages and they are very easy to learn.
 
@HighlyRadioactive Right, so @mypronounismonicareinstate's "secret" is flawed.
 
@Third-party'Chef' I can name another: W.
Oh, and Samau.
 
@RaghuRanganathan Seems to me that golfing languages need a lot of maintenance in the battle between challengers to issue challenges for which golfing languages lack built-in functions, and golfing language maintainers to build in functions to solve challenges.
 
3:09 PM
well doesn't it sorta detract from figuring a solution out instead of using a builtin
or is simplification just the point
cause otherwise the challenging aspect of it is heavily minimized
 
3:23 PM
@RaghuRanganathan Not many languages have a builtin for every challenge, so all but the most basic challenges still involve having to come up with an algorithm, then making that as short as possible
Its just that golfing languages allow you to create a much shorter algorithm, and therefore program
For example, if part of the challenge is to calculate det(M) of a matrix M, most golfing languages will just let you use a det builtin, rather than having to implement one yourself
 
@cairdcoinheringaahing So fun when a language doesn't have a built-in, but the code to implement the functionality is shorter than other languages' name for the built-in. E.g. det() takes 5 chars but SAX implements it with -.×
 
@Adám That's why I just make all my builtins one character long :P
Pah to multibyte characters counting as "more than 1" :P
 
Sure, but then you can't really have more than 256.
 
I actually have a language in dev that has around 4000 commands available in ~32 different command characters :P
It just happens to be wildly inconvenient to use
 
I have been readin esolangs for an hour now and 256 looks cool
can't go wrong with 4000 commands though
 
3:36 PM
You can. My imagination isn't good enough to come up with 4000 unique commands
 
witha good enough search function anything is possible
are there any integral guides where I can peek at the atoms
 
@cairdcoinheringaahing Isn't that just about how many built-ins Wolfram Language has?
 
@Adám Ooh, I should add a "recognise goat" builtin :P
 
how should that work?
 
300
A: Upgoat or Downgoat?

A SimmonsMathematica, 100%, 141 bytes f@x_:=Count[1>0]@Table[ImageInstanceQ[x,"caprine animal",RecognitionThreshold->i/100],{i,0,50}];If[f@#>f@ImageReflect@#,"Up","Down"]<>"goat"& Well, this feels more than a little like cheating. It's also incredibly slow as well as being very silly. Function f sees rou...

Mathematica has a builtin for determining goats. I don't know how to feel about that. — Robert Fraser Feb 10 '16 at 15:21
@cairdcoinheringaahing Don't forget a built-in for metro stations as a function of the continent. Mathematica is for some reason missing that one.
 
3:48 PM
wow
that's beautiful
 
Speaking of down-goats, here are all the European metro stations in a hundred bytes of APL: Try it online!
 
Wow
thats some mad compression
 
@RaghuRanganathan It isn't compression, the necessary data comes built-in. The code is just for converting it to the desired format.
 
@Adám Idk, if I'm expanding out that much, I might need 33 command characters
:P
 
4:12 PM
oh
makes sense
its like err gzipping
Hey
theres a snippet to show a leaderboard
but it just does't come up
it is a problem on my side?
 
4:52 PM
@RaghuRanganathan Seems to work for me on FFQ/W
 
yeah I guess it was supposed to take a while
 
 
2 hours later…
6:50 PM
0
Q: Von Neumann Ordinals

golf69Von Neumann ordinals define the nonnegative integers using set notation. Zero is said to be equal to the empty set, \$\{\}\$, and a given nonnegative integer is equal to the set of all nonnegative integers less than it. For instance: \$2=\{0,1\}\$ \$1=\{0\}=\{\{\}\}\$ By substituting the values o...

 
7:40 PM
0
Q: Thin Paper Folding

SomoKRoceSThin Paper Folding This is a "lighter" version of the challenge Paper Folding for the win. This challenge is being posted as a different challenge with many modifications in order to try and get wider range of interesting answers. For anyone who is answering the first challenge, I marked the cha...

 
 
1 hour later…
9:09 PM
@RaghuRanganathan someone's done their research
 
Ada
Huh, so you're the "replaces chuck norris"?
 
@Ada apparently so
 
Ada
That, and the obvious reference to your profile picture.
 
Fwiw, I was asleep while that conversation happened
Hence my lack of participation
But I appreciate it nonetheless
 
Ada
I can tell, so you're the one who created Keg?
 
9:18 PM
@Ada yep, guilty as charged
 
Ada
I still need to take a look at that :)
 
;P
 
Ada
So is "one does not simply ... outgolf Lyxal" a meme yet?
 
@Ada well, I don't think it will be.
I get outgolfed quite frequently
 
Ada
Ah
 
9:27 PM
Heh
Still, thanks for the interest
Anyhow, I hate to leave, but I'm going to have to go do a 3 hour test now
 
@Ada It took Dennis years of golfing prowess to get that honour. All respect to Lyxal, but they have a looong way to go :P
5
 
Ada
I know ;)
 
Maybe not the best room but: does anyone know a good place to find integration problems? I need to test my calculus engine. I'm working through this, but it doesn't have too many
Alternatively, if you guys want to throw any my way, I won't object
 
Ada
You can always try integral of e to the x first.
 
@Ada I've done some basic tests, but I'm looking for more complex problems
 
Ada
9:37 PM
Ah
 
9:56 PM
@cairdcoinheringaahing I agree
@cairdcoinheringaahing reverse chain rule is always a fun one
 
Ada
I've just noticed those two already shared a meme.
 
@Lyxal Oh yeah, that one took me ~4 hours and I'm still not sure it works
Although, it failed on (3x+5)⋅cos(x÷4), which isn't a good sign
 
@cairdcoinheringaahing does it follow a method similar to finding an obvious primitive and then multiplying by the factor that said primitive differs from the integral?
 
@Lyxal Maybe, but if so, not in those words :P
I run it through a parser, which I then use to break down depending on what function/operation is "first"
Given that u-sub is almost always f'(g(x))g'(x), it checks for multiplication, then tries to reverse engineer the f'(g(x))g'(x)
 
E.g. If the problem is \int (3x+3)^2, you might let u = (3x+3)^3 (because clearly that's going to be a part of the answer). Then find u' (6(3x+3)^2). Then the problem becomes \int \frac{1}{6}u' dx = 1/6 * u
@cairdcoinheringaahing that sounds like what I described
But more succinct ;P
 
10:10 PM
@Lyxal For mine, it would match the pattern (ax+b)*n (* is power) and integrate that
It's stuff like xe*(x*2) where u-sub is used
 
 
1 hour later…
11:40 PM
0
A: Sandbox for Proposed Challenges

attStroke Count of a Chinese Numeral codegolf Task Given an integer \$n\in\left[0,10^{12}\right)\$ in any convenient format, compute the number of strokes needed to write that number in (simplified) Chinese. Background Chinese numbers are expressed with a system of digits and places, just like in En...

 
11:52 PM
0
Q: Domino Recurrence Generator

BubblerChallenge We once had a challenge to count domino tilings of m by n grid, and we all know that, for any fixed number of rows, the number of domino tilings by columns forms a linear recurrence. Then why not have a challenge to compute the linear recurrence?! Let's define \$D_m(n)\$ as the number o...

 

« first day (3475 days earlier)      last day (51 days later) »