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2:04 PM
@Gryphon Sure. Rape penalties should be pretty high, but if a person (not always women) is willing to lie about being raped, and put someone else through that punishment, then I don't see why they shouldn't have to face it themselves? I was watching a thing the other day, and one of the speakers was talking about his buddy that broke up with his girlfriend, and she decided to accuse him of rape in revenge, and so he went to prison.
The only reason he got out was because after 2 years she told someone that she felt bad about it.
And according to the person telling the story, she didn't face any consequences for sending an innocent person to prison.
Now, I think that she should have faced the same penalty, spend at least exactly the same amount of time in prison as he did. Or possibly as long as he would have if she hadn't had an attack of conscience.
Or at least something for robbing an innocent person of 2 years of their life.
 
@AndyD273 I don't disagree that the penalties should be harsh, but I think the penalty for rape should be either a death sentence or a "you will never leave prison" sentence. Which seems a bit harsh for what is essentially perjury. Not that perjury isn't bad, but it's not death-sentence level bad.
 
 
2 hours later…
3:52 PM
@Gryphon but it's not just perjury. If the penalty for rape was death, then a false allegation would be murder. Weaponizing the justice system to murder someone that did nothing wrong. If it's life in prison, then it's not perjury, it's kidnapping and enslavement. The harsh penalties aren't a problem, is that the system for investigating them is imperfect, where sometimes there is a bias when it should be an impartial investigation of the facts.
Take the Duke lacrosse team, whose lives were ruined. Or the guy that Emma Sulkowicz lied about. They lost a lot.
 
 
4 hours later…
7:55 PM
 

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