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1:14 AM
@Stiv WAL(NU)T
Attempted the C4 rather than the puzzle as the latter one's a tough nut (pun intended :P) to crack
 
 
2 hours later…
3:14 AM
@oAlt oh, nice find. I didn't think of doing it backward like that.
 
3:48 AM
same, got misdirected at first
 
Sid
4:12 AM
Within is the connector?
(wordplay) within (definition) sounds wrong, no?
 
I think the intended wordplay is (MU = character from Greece) trapped within (WALT disney), so there's no connector word.
 
yeah, [disney] [character from greece trapped within]
 
 
2 hours later…
6:33 AM
@oAlt That's the one, and yes that's the intended wordplay too :)
I realise my last two have both involved Greek letters, but that's the last of those from me for a while!
 
that was a pretty well disguised one, "disney character" is such a natural unit
of course, there are also disney characters from greece (in "Hercules") :P
 
7:05 AM
@Jafe also Mia Thermopolis's (spelling?) mother IIRC, and probably some more people
 
@Stiv ikr
 
7:25 AM
CCCC: Actor is left on seen, confused; oAlt is interrupting? (4, 6)
I had this prepared long ago but still, the difficulty is now starting to drop again :P
 
7:48 AM
I think I know, I just don't want to do the next one ;p
@oAlt Eh - L(eft) + (ON SEEN)* with [I AM] interrupting -> LIAM NEESON?
 
that has to be it
 
I can cede to you, Jafe, if you have one ready :)
 
sure, i'd be glad to go next if you don't want to
 
Welp - I have one, but I am not sure it is good.
 
there's one way to find out :)
 
7:54 AM
Here - let me see what critique I get for this anyway... It may be too easy. :)
CCCC: Dash and twelve points arranged one in front of the other (6)
 
@Graylocke correct
 
@oAlt (well I am glad - because I put up my terrible clue anyway ;p)
 
Lolll
 
I do like the self-reference there.
 
Same
 
7:59 AM
You really shouldn't interrupt Liam Neeson though. He gets quite... agitated.
 
"What I do have is a very special set of skills. Skills that --" "Oh hey, it's oAlt here, what's up?"
 
Because of the vaguely computer-related name, I can't help but read that like some kind of insane Clippy. "You look like you are trying to threaten some kidnappers!"
 
heheh
 
(Not implying that oAlt is in any way a] insane or b] like Clippy)
 
tried to make useful six-letter words in morse code from one dash followed by 12 dots and failed miserably... time for a new plan
 
8:16 AM
Wahahah
 
heh
 
THESES &lit because THESES is — •••• • ••• • ••• in Morse and theses have, um, punctuation in them. #GreatC4Solutions
 
hehee
 
hahaha
 
i do a lot of geography-themed online quizzes and i've noticed a couple of things that are almost universally true
1) if a list of countries contains latvia or lithuania, it contains both
and 2) portugal is never the answer to anything
 
8:29 AM
Weird that to go from two theses to only one, you'd have to add exactly one dot.
@Jafe ... That sounds a bit like a challenge ;p
 
or remove three dashes from the E :P
 
hahaha
touche
 
9:07 AM
"arranged one" could be an anagram of ONE and "the other" could be an anagram of THE but there are don't seem to be any words where the ONE* is in front of the THE*
long story short, anagram indicators are everywhere
 
9:23 AM
oh... it's RANGED ("arranged one in front of the other"). The wordplay is RAN (dash... in some tense or other) + GED (twelve points, because that's what I got on my GED tests in total)
On a more serious note, I wonder whether perhaps "twelve" = XII, or C, from hexadecimal.
(XII seems unpromising.)
 
@msh210 <blinks> uh… that wasn’t the answer I had in mind ;p hehe
 
Good thing I kept reading, almost thought that was legit lololol
 
</blinks>
 
@Jafe thanks Jafe, I was having trouble reading my screen all of a sudden.
 
hehe
 
9:41 AM
I'm thinking 'dash' clues either 'en' or 'em' or even 'N' or 'M'. If 'twelve points' = SUED somehow, then ENSUED would just about be a possible parsing of the remaining definition part of the word...
Whatever the answer, I feel that pinpointing 'twelve points' holds the key.
 
a touchdown is six points, is there anything that's worth twelve in one sport or another?
 
Eurovision winning votes?
Double-six or treble-four in darts?
(or twelve in darts, of course - haha!)
 
Does anyone else feel on edge when it is their clue being discussed? Or is that just my constant self doubt? ;p
 
Always
 
DOZEN is twelve and contains two points (E, N)
 
9:49 AM
Especially when people are way off the mark, and you begin to doubt whether you even know English despite it being your mother tongue...
 
@Stiv Well that makes me feel a bit better ^^* Thanks
 
"the other" can be "al" from Latin
IAL is a tempting word ending, but I don't see anything.
 
Almost a solution: EM (dash) + C (12 in hexadecimal) + EES (compass 'points') = ''one in front of the other" (i.e. someone up in front of an audience) but really it's a plural, so EMCEE would work for an enumeration of (5) rather than (6)!
 
10:06 AM
EMCEED can mean "arranged one [guest performer / speaker / whatever] in front of the other" which is what masters of ceremony do. But D is not a point afaict.
 
Nice but not the answer I had in mind…
 
Yeah, I was just thinking aloud.
 
It would be a direction in Zork! ^^*
 
true, but not a point, I don't think
 
hehe no…
 
10:19 AM
0
Q: No Time to Die, Period

Parcly TaxelInside MI6's server farm in the middle of the night, the operator's eyes skittered frantically over an intercepted message: The development of our new APG code has been coming along nicely. Tomorrow you, under my supervision, will rig the random number generators – both mechanical and electronic...

 
10:33 AM
something somethign ZODIAC?
 
Dash can clue PARR. But, again, I don't see anything....
 
@msh210 or it could be a sprinkle of somethining in cookgin
twelve -> dozen, somehow reverse the first three and you get ZOD
 
11:04 AM
"arranged one in front of the other" could be something like QUEUED
which has QED on the outside, although that's only three points ∴ instead of 12
 
11:18 AM
Is "dash and twelve points" perhaps Morse code?
 
@Anonymus25 See THESES above
 
if it's a morse code anagram there are a lot of ways to arrange one dash and 12 dots
 
 
1 hour later…
12:46 PM
@Jafe Yeah, but if the dash if first then I think THESES is the only common six-letter word.
@Stiv There are some companies named Empica.
 
12 point is also the number of points on a UK licence before you're banned from driving
 
. . . which can happen if you dash.
A "point" is also a dollar (in stock prices).
 
@msh210 could dash also mean strike out? or Dash hopes?
 
1:02 PM
@AncientSwordRage dash hopes for sure; and by extension maybe it can mean to strike out or even be an anagram indicator
(but the literal meaning of dash hopes is I think to throw down. checking...)
not "throw down"
 
> The oldest sense is that in dash to pieces and dashed hopes. Meaning "scatter or sprinkle"
 
Those are two separate sentences.
 
ahh yes you are correct
 
dash AND = DAN ; twelve = C (hexadecimal) ; points = EE ; arranged one in front of the other = DANCEE (someone who is danced, i.e. arranged one in front of the other). This has simply got to be right. Never mind that DANCEE isn't a word, that doesn't matter.
 
>.>;
@msh210 I'm sorry?
I didn't mean to dash people's hopes ;p
I do like the idea that dancing is about arranging your partner around the dancefloor though.
 
1:19 PM
@Graylocke stand here, no wait, stand here
 
put your right foot in... now put your right foot out...
 
dashee, dancee, prancee...
 
donnee?
 
cupid and comet and vixen?
 
1:37 PM
blitzee
 
Last but not least, Rudoplh
Is that how to spell it?
Not so sure
 
rudolph
 
the red nosed reindee
 
:P
 
1:43 PM
rain, dear.
 
reined ear?
 
A permille sign, a quincunx, a decimal point, and an ellipsis mark walk into a bar.
 
@msh210 STOP STOP!
 
2:13 PM
Ray N'Dir.
 
I wrote a brute force morse parser (a brute morse decoder, if you will) and I'm not recognizing any words other than THESES or DIESES, so maybe it's not morse
Unless BEESES is a word, the plural of bees
 
@Randal'Thor Rand Ear
@MikeQ I'd love to see what, I tried to write one a while back and failed
 
Easy with recursion. Loop over the next 1-4 characters to see if they're valid morse or end of input string, otherwise recurse on the remainder of the input string. Once you hit the end of the string, print. I also put an optional variable for max length, to filter out results that aren't 6 (or any other number) characters.
 
@MikeQ ahh ok
I was trying that, but it was a 'does this work in a dev console javascript' thing
 
Any javascript program can be performed in 1 line of javascript, even if it shouldn't be
 
2:24 PM
I tried finding all partitions of dots and dashes, but I didn't do a proper filtering by valid morse
do you have the code anywhere?
@MikeQ the fact that I shouldn't sort of makes me want to more
 
2:48 PM
it's so tempting to make this clue a hidden-word clue, but then i would be exceeding my quota and more importantly it's also gonna add to the number of weak points in my crossword :P
 
3:07 PM
@AncientSwordRage I've uploaded the morse brute-force decoder to pastebin
 
@Randal'Thor woop woop
 
@MikeQ I'll have to look after work (no pastebin at work)
 
 
5 hours later…
7:59 PM
0
Q: Can someone help me with this Kakuro puzzle?

KidburlaCan someone help with next steps for this Kakuro? I solved most of it but there is an area I'm stuck on. source: Puzzle Page app

 
 
2 hours later…
10:17 PM
0
Q: Is this media "treasure hunt" acceptable?

AlmoI have a come up with a list of license plates from movies and TV shows. They all show prominently in the frame for enough time to be read easily. The solution to the "puzzle" is just a list of the shows and movies they come from. I wonder if this is appropriate for the site, as it's not somethin...

 

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