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12:35 AM
This show looks promising:
> The Netflix original series Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts from DreamWorks Animation has unveiled their voice cast for the forthcoming coming-of-age animated series which includes Karen Fukuhara, Deon Cole, Coy Stewart, Sydney Mikayla and Dee Bradley Baker. The series will also feature an all-star roster of guest stars including Sterling K. Brown, Dan Stevens, Lea Delaria, Joan Jett, John Hodgman, GZA and more. Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts will premiere on the streaming platform January 14.
 
Ash
It looks like fun!
 
Agreed :)
I love the art style, and the music is great
 
12:54 AM
Oooh
"everything trying to kill them is downright adorable"
Is it Christmas already?
XD
 
 
4 hours later…
4:32 AM
The Wolf Among Us 2 lives!
> LCG Entertainment, doing business as Telltale, has confirmed that The Wolf Among Us 2 is again in development.

Telltale has partnered with AdHoc Studio, a creative house formed by former Telltale Games employees and focused on interactive narrative, to resume work on and co-develop the second season of the award-winning The Wolf Among Us. The title was revealed tonight during The Game Awards.

[...]

Returning to work on The Wolf Among Us 2 via AdHoc are directors Nick Herman and Dennis Lenart, along with writer Pierre Shorette. Also returning are the award-winning voice actors, Adam Har
 
Oh wow
I never played the first one but that's very surprising
I'm not really into the Telltale stuff myself but that's good news for anyone who liked it
 
 
1 hour later…
5:49 AM
Yeah. I'm skeptical of the new company's business practices (given that they mentioned being willing to hire former Telltale staff as freelancers with the "possibility" of full-time employment later)... But I hope it's a good game.
That said, AdHoc Studio are former Telltale employees, so hopefully that's a good sign
 
 
1 hour later…
7:16 AM
An entertaining read about a hard-to-find bug in *The Outer Worlds* and how it was finally fixed: https://twitter.com/_taylorswope/status/1205252714680045568
The full thread is worth a read, but the highlight is the video of the bug itself: https://twitter.com/_taylorswope/status/1205252973611237376
 
wow
that's quite a bug
 
8:10 AM
One of my friends' kids is rapidly approaching the age where they start liking brain teasers so I'm refreshing on some of my favorite puzzles from when I was a kid. One classic is the puzzle of the jealous husbands: it's a fairly standard river-crossing puzzle with three husbands and their wives wanting to cross a river with a single rowboat that can carry at most two people and cannot move without someone on board to row it.
 
@kviiri At least is not the old cheating wifes problem (rearranged in at least 10 different variants that just change the backstory but not the actual puzzle)
 
The added constraint of this version of the classic puzzle is that each husband is jealous and therefore needs to be around their wife when there are other men around (on the same shore, or in the boat together). They won't mind women mingling. Eg. a husband cannot, at start, row over to the destination shore without taking their wife along because that'd leave their wife unattended with other men.
@Derpy This might be the same problem. I'm actually getting there :D I've heard amusingly many variations on why exactly a man can't trust their wife to be alone while other men are present, ranging from "all men are opportunistic molesters" to "all women are promiscuous temptresses". Sometimes both.
 
@kviiri nope, not the one I am thinking about. It is actually a quite good logical puzzle, it is just that the most common variation makes it about cheating wife and such.
 
Now, I like the puzzle a lot but I dislike its flair. Does anyone have an intuitive version of the puzzle that doesn't rely on sexist or otherwise unhealthy relationship dynamics?
@Derpy Ooh, is it the induction puzzle where every wife in the village knows whose husband is cheating, except if it's their own?
 
@kviiri exactly.
 
8:18 AM
I love that one! Although I prefer non-sexist ones of that too.
There's a cool short story based on the "blue eyes" variation of the puzzle:
 
@kviiri I know a similar puzzle that is a goat, a lettuce or cabbage or something, and a wolf
 
@trogdor Yeah, that's a timeless classic. it's a much simpler one though
 
true
I just thought I would mention it
you take the goat across first because neither the wolf or the cabbage will eat the other
then you take either across but bring back the goat, and then take the other thing, and then the goat again
stupid goat
 
It's amazing to think someone came up with the goat-cabbage-wolf puzzle somewhere and millenia later it's known to ~everyone around the world. There's a serious cultural influencer we will never know the name of
 
no problems without that goat
 
8:22 AM
Yeah
 
@kviiri I think about that kind of thing a lot
 
Similarly to the jealous husbands --- as soon as those pesky men are on the destination shore the problems are gone!
 
lol
 
I wonder which I've seen more of, though: legit river crossing puzzles or parodies of them
 
I don't know if I have seen parodies of them
unless the problem is everything other than origional ones is a parody
then I'm in the same,.... boat
ba dum tshh
 
8:30 AM
In a Finnish humor magazine, there was one with a really complicated set-up back in the 1970's or so. The premise was that a family of X-many people, including Y-many kids who were lighter (so more could fit on the boat) but weaker (so it took at least two of them to row) and their dog(s) who weight as much as kids and can't row at all, wanted to get to the island zoo (Korkeasaari) after they missed the ferry and all they had was a rickety rowboat
"How do they get to the zoo?" was the question. The answer? Use the bridge, which had been recently completed.
 
@kviiri pin it, I will have to read the full version later. But it looks kinda good.
 
Granted, the parody didn't have as much appeal to my generation who don't remember the time before the bridge :-)
@trogdor I have a faint recollection there was one in the Simpsons, and XKCD had this:
@Derpy Okely dokely, pinned ^^
 
lol
ah ok like that
 
A few years ago, a magazine published a "physics" puzzle that went like this: you are on the border a pit and the only way to cross it is an old wooden bridge.
The bridge will break if anything heavier than 71kg crosses it. You weight 70kg, but you also have two golden ingot, 1kg each. How can you safely cross?
The alleged solution was to juggle the two ingots so that you didn't hold both of them at any given time.
Now, first issue is that you would probably at least need to pass a very hard Dex check roll to do that....
 
@Derpy /me adjusts glasses --- WELL TECHNIC'LEEEE you can just take the gold ingots over because nothing heavier than 71 kg crosses it --- one thing weighing 70 kg, and two things weighing 1 kg each, but no (single) thing weighing more than 71 kg ;)
But I like the juggling solution, although I'm not sure if it's actually physically sound if we consider an actual rickety bridge. Pushing the gold ingot up would make one effectively heavier for a moment
 
8:41 AM
@kviiri they are physicist, the whole "you and the gold ingot" is probably modeled as a spherical cow in vacuum
@kviiri exactly, it doesn't work at all.
It is... third law of motion.
a month later the same magazine published an apology for the wrong solution they gave :P
 
Awws :D
Well, that's a relief, I don't need to ask my SO about it
She's my go-to source for physics clarifications
 
@kviiri but you should share the story so that she too gets a laugh out of it.
 
@Derpy Excellent point!
Oh my, what would I do without the good people of the internets
@Derpy On re-reading it, the question further asks only how one can safely cross. I guess forgoing one's greed and leaving the ingots behind is also an option?
Stuff like this is why I tend to get into analysis paralysis when specifying my puzzles :D
 
@kviiri to be fair, they also never specified how wide the gap is, so one could also argue that maybe you could toss the ingots on the other side...
 
@Derpy And there's no reason why one couldn't make two trips
 
8:52 AM
but that wasn't really meant to be a lateral-thinking puzzle, just a physic based one.
 
Yeah :>
 
With a wrong solution added in :P
 
Although since we came from a context of river-crossing puzzles, solutions involving multiple crossings spring to mind with ease.
 
@kviiri I think they covered that somehow. Something about you having to escape fast because reasons.
I don't fully remember all the context, sorry. Only the wrong solution stuck to memory
 
Ah okay, I thought it was more or less verbatim
Makes more sense now :)
I love puzzles
When I was a kid I had the greatest old-school jokebook I knew of. It was half jokes, the other half was riddles, puzzles, pranks, love-testers, y'know all the best schoolkid stuff.
Some of the puzzles were more genuine, others... less so. Eg. one was yet another highly complicated set-up, beginning with something like "Imagine you're on a locked room, in a ship that's sinking..." with the objective being to get out of this highly convoluted sticky situation
The solution given? "Stop imagining it."
The boat had a ferocious tiger on it too, predating a certain novel about an Indian castaway by at least two decades I assume.
 
9:04 AM
@kviiri I had a 300pg book of just riddles.
 
@Derpy Ooh
My grandparents had one too. Actually heck, I wonder what happened to it...
I only remembered it now. Should've cleared it out of their estate, but it's probably gone. Oh well.
Matter, matter, doesn't matter.
 
And the riddles went from "if a bottle plus a candy costs 110$ and the bottle costs 100$ more than the candy, how much the candy costs?" simple ones to things that must have been spawned by Cthulhu like this one
The Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever is a logic puzzle so called by American philosopher and logician George Boolos and published in The Harvard Review of Philosophy in 1996. Boolos' article includes multiple ways of solving the problem. A translation in Italian was published earlier in the newspaper La Repubblica, under the title L'indovinello più difficile del mondo. It is stated as follows: Three gods A, B, and C are called, in no particular order, True, False, and Random. True always speaks truly, False always speaks falsely, but whether Random speaks truly or falsely is a completely random matter...
I would have to check (provided that I can still find the book in the first place) - the solution I remember also had to take probability in account, so I think they actually made some minor changes to the original version to make it worse
I clearly remember that at least one of the question involved asking one god which other god was more probable to give a specific answer to a specific question.
Useless to say that since I often took the book to school (ELEMENTARY school), my friends quickly started to hate it...
 
The one at my grandparents was Finnish folk riddle tradition, not really logic puzzles (which I liked more, tbh). They have a similar feel to the English rhyming riddles ("what am I") in that they're often short verses describing things from an unusual angle (eg. presenting an inanimate object as participating in some activity that figuratively describes them)
 
I think the book was sold by a weird "Book club" that used to exist back then.
It was a weird idea - you would receive a catalogue every month with available books, and you had to buy at least a book every (don't remember) months.
the only advantage is that somehow they managed to have weird books that no bookstore had.
 
There's apparently an archive of over a hundred thousand folk riddles but I couldn't find a way to access it online yet. I found some smaller lists though but many of these are honestly kind of rubbish in a way that suggests our standards as a society have evolved :grin:
 
9:17 AM
I still have a magic book that was made for professional stage magicians.
The intro even mentions the International Federation of Magic Societies
I think that the book was supposedly only to be sold to associates.
 
Ooh
That's exclusive
 
I don't really know how they managed to be able to sell it.
 
@Derpy I very much prefer other words than ja and da given that one is "yes" in Swedish and the other is "yes" in Russian :>
Okay heck, these old folk riddles are a bit too figurative at times
"One house, a thousand windows". Guess what that is?
 
But I do know that is the only book I saw back then that contains actual description of stage illusions like the famous Indian Basket or the Sword Box.
 
A sieve. I mean I get the thousand windows part but I have quite a lot of difficulty associating any sieve I've seen with houses :P
 
9:22 AM
Now those are "common" knowledge because Internet, but back then all magic books just had card tricks.
@kviiri an hundred knights, bloody faces and swords drawn.
....The cherries on a tree
apparently the stem is the sword.
 
Heh
Ok this one makes more sense: "Sneaks in through the window, but can't get out the door."
It's daylight
 
@kviiri or my cat.
 
Two heads, two arms, six legs?
(a rider)
 
@kviiri yep, I heard of that one.
 
Yeah, I assume that'd be one of the more cosmopolitan ones. Might be of a foreign origin
oh this one is good (although I had to slightly alter it to make it translate well) "Reaches further than the tallest tree but remains lower than the lowly grass."
 
9:32 AM
@kviiri basically any insect? :P
a bee?
 
@Derpy A road!
The original one is a bit more succinct because Finnish doesn't have the long/tall distinction, so saying it's "longer than the tallest tree" doesn't immediately clue people in that it's not long in that direction.
 
On a sightly different topic, I was wondering. Do you by any chance happen to know the "evil" company called Hanoyama?
 
No, doesn't ring a bell.
 
the ones who do evil thing like this?
 
Is that a puzzle box?
 
9:36 AM
yep.
 
As for the original question, my current best candidate is that I'll replace the three husbands with three bakers and their wives with animate gingerbread men that only their creators can resist eating :P
 
An evil puzzle box.
 
Evil because it's difficult or because Satan is trapped inside?
 
@kviiri first one :P
 
@Derpy There's a First One trapped inside? Is it Light Hope?
ye old chat.se switcheroo höhöhö
 
9:38 AM
their cursed puzzle boxes continue to pop up at every anime con.....
and I end up buying one.
and then another....
and the cursed thing DON'T come with a solution sheet
 
Y'know it would be a really evil prank to first create a reputation for making ridiculosly intricate puzzle boxes and then just ship a solid brick with your company logo on it and snicker when people try to open it
 
nope, the things actually work.
There are solution videos available to proof that
but they are still evil.
here, this is a picture of the two pieces split up
obviously, you can't see what keeps them together in the picture.
and the actual mechanism is pretty "fun"
to be fair, it is also one of the highest difficulty level puzzle they made.
> I came up with the idea for this puzzle when I was 19 years old. It just came to me during a stroll home in the snow, truly a creation of my youth. Unfortunately, saying anything here about its construction would give away how to solve it. I certainly can’t disappoint the fans that have come to expect frustratingly difficult puzzle from me. Besides, the fans that refuse to accept any link of hint are those who make me the happiest!
The key word is “needle”.
and yep, the key word makes sense... but I can tell you that you would probably think it means something completely different from what they actually meant.
 
10:00 AM
It would be fun to describe how the puzzle lock actually works, but I wouldn't want to spoil it in case someone is interested.
 
@Derpy maybe use ROT13 or something?
 
@V2Blast hehe, I was talking about the puzzle box in the pictures above
 
10:28 AM
Oh yeah our office cafeteria has beetroots today
yumyum
 
 
9 hours later…
7:15 PM
@Derpy I understood that, just wasn't sure if you were thinking of describing how it works in text form :P
 

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