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8:14 AM
Hi, Any one here?
 
 
2 hours later…
9:54 AM
No
Hey mods what should ve done of a user that keeps generating new accounts and keeps multiposting same questions over and over again across the network
 
10:23 AM
@NeverLookBack Hi. Now there is. But in general just say whatever you want to say and people can reply whenever they see it.
@joojaa Makes me curious. Will you link to one of those questions?
Or maybe I can guess ...
 
 
2 hours later…
11:56 AM
Hi, okay Wolf, am asking.


I am new to photoshop. was watching a tutorial about creating TIFF Bitmap from JPEG. there the instructor creating Bitmap directly and his greyscale is already ticked.
but when I was creating mine is not. I have to convert the colorful image into grayscale and then into BItmap.

his version is photoshop 2015, mine is photoshop CC 2021
I wanna know is my approach correct? I mean manually ticking grayscale?

plz ignore if it sounds ridiculous. I am a newbie. I am confused so am asking.
Thank you.
 
12:24 PM
@NeverLookBack I'm here now. In short the difference between your document and the instructor's simply is that your document is in RGB and the instructor's is in Grayscale.
@NeverLookBack You can't convert directly from color image to bitmap mode. You have to first convert to grayscale.
@NeverLookBack Btw: "Ticking grayscale" or rather selecting a color mode using Image > Mode is sort of a shortcut. What really happens when selecting "Grayscale" (or RGB or CMYK) from the menu is that the document is converted to that color mode using the settings specified in Edit > Color Settings.
So it can be a bit misleading as a lot of people think you can simply "switch" color mode to for example CMYK without specifying a color profile. But in reality a color profile is always used when switching modes.
 
@Wolf That means the instructor creates a new document in grayscale and then brings/drags the RGB image into that?
 
@NeverLookBack Perhaps. I haven't seen the tutorial. I can just see that the moment you take the screenshot, the document is already grayscale.
 
he didn't say that either in tutorial. :@ why instructors think we all knows all beforehand?
 
But it doesn't look very important in your case as the graphics you are making look neutral anyway? I mean your document is RGB but all your graphics seem gray.
 
12:40 PM
I am trying to create TIFF bitmap for Illustrator as texture.
So I am confused if I can do that correctly
Thank you so much WOLF
Wolff*
 
@NeverLookBack Bitmap images (also called 1-bit) are a very simple image in the sense that it can only have black and white pixels.
So it's pretty hard to mess up. If you like the pixels you see and it's bitmap mode, that's all there is to it.
@NeverLookBack But there is one thing. I'm guessing you want to use this for print right?
 
yes
for print
 
So you should be careful with the resolution.
 
i took 800 ppi
 
You know that normally we say images should be around 300 ppi?
 
12:43 PM
yes, Nut in tutorial he took 600 ppi. so I took 800 ppi
:D
BUT*
 
But bitmap images will print sharp because the have no gray pixels so they need to be larger. Normally we say 1200 ppi.
 
OH MY GOD!! 1200 ppi!!!
 
But it all depends on which size you use them in Illustrator.
 
meaning?
 
@NeverLookBack The resolution of an image always goes hand in hand with its physical size.
 
12:45 PM
which size-- can you please explain this part?
@Wolff ah I see. never knew
 
So if you make a for example 30 x 30 cm image at 800 ppi in Photoshop but you only make it 15 x 15 cm in Illustrator, you get 1600 ppi.
Makes sense?
 
absolutely. Yes Now makes sense
you are Einstein
I didnt know any of these
 
@NeverLookBack It's important! But you don't have to do much math yourself. In Illustrator and InDesign you can select an image and read the Effective PPI.
 
The Effective PPI must be 300 for an ordinary image (not bitmap). The number in the image itself doesn't have much meaning.
 
12:48 PM
here it says 72 ppi
should i increase it 1200 ppi?
alwys?
 
@NeverLookBack Oh that's another matter. That resolution is just for the pixel based effects you add in Illustrator.
The images you place in Illustrator have their own resolution.
 
how can I learn all these Wolff?
:'(
 
@NeverLookBack School? 😀
 
hahaha
No I mean Digital Tutor? PHlearn? Pluralsight? gnome? Artstation?
any exact location to learn these resources?
 
@NeverLookBack What are those strange words you say? 😂
 
12:51 PM
LMAO
I think I am becoming Crazy. I try to learn from all these platforms
 
This answer is about the basics of resolution, but it's a bit dry. graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/a/130493
@NeverLookBack Tutorials?
 
Okay, Kindly tell me one more thing. If I ever wanna reread this discussion in future is there any way?
@Wolff yes.
 
@NeverLookBack You mean this talk we just had?
 
Thank you so much for sharing that. I am gonna read that,
No NO, This convo between you and me. You said some stuff.( Resolution, 1200 ppi, print etc) I wanna research about these all
but I see others Chat here as well. So am I gonna lose it?\
this discussion?
 
I think you can somehow save a conversation, not sure how. You could click left of a sentence and click "permalink" and save that. Or you could later search the room for yourself saying "resolution".
 
12:56 PM
wow. Yes I got that
 
@NeverLookBack, I hope I don't just confuse you!
 
No no. You didnt confuse me at all. You just showed me how less I know, I am gonna learn more from now on
Thank you so much
 
@NeverLookBack No problem
 
why it turns yellow?
 
@NeverLookBack Just to show you that this is the exact line you have linked to.
 
12:59 PM
Oh Okay.
 
@NeverLookBack, anyway bitmap (1-bit) images are a cool thing because, if the resolution is high enough, they print as sharp as vector graphics.
 
yes. I am gonna use that as Texture on A illustration.
an*
 
So if you have drawings that are sharp lines with no gradients or tones, you can get nice result with bitmap.
 
What I did is I took high res brush paint from web, turned that into bitmap
and used that as texture in illustrator
 
@NeverLookBack Cool. You can also use grayscale images if you want to have tones.
 
1:04 PM
Okay. I will. Thank you . :)
Thank you for your time and help.
I really appreciate it.
 
@NeverLookBack You are welcome! I don't mind explaining.
 

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