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1:53 AM
@GratefulDisciple Thanks
 
HNQ
2:49 AM
4
Q: When is money first mentioned in Holy Scriptures?

GeremiaWhen is money first mentioned in Holy Scriptures? And what is the Hebrew word for it? cf. my previous question: "Is money a consequence of Original Sin?"

 
3:28 AM
@HoldToTheRod You're welcome. BTW, I frequently listen to Protestant Gavin Ortlund's YouTube channel that use historical theology defends Protestantism and classical theology in general, against Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodox, and atheists. This latest debate video on the latest challenge to Divine Simplicity reminds me to ask LDS position in comparison with Divine Simplicity with regards to attributes of God and of time.
@curiousdannii You may be interested too. I noticed in Ryan Mullin's co-edited book series Studies in the Doctrine of God that Roger Olson (a notorious evangelical but denier of God-outside-time) is in the editorial board! I have only beginning to understand Divine Simplicity, so these modern perspectives is still outside my comfort zone.
 
4:24 AM
@KorvinStarmast In the beginning of that latest video, Gavin recommended this book: Bullies and Saints: An Honest Look at the Good and Evil of Christian History, currently the #1 best seller for Christian History, and also on sale on Amazon Kindle ($3.99, 79% off $18.99 paperback version). Said that St. Ambrose was a bully at times.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:31 AM
@GratefulDisciple I haven't read that one, but John Dickson is usually great
 
 
6 hours later…
12:52 PM
@GratefulDisciple He certainly had a strong will; his digging in his heels and the ensuing siege of the Cathedral in Milan being but one example ...
If you look at the nature of religious and theological "debate" from about the time of Diocletian to Justinian, and the wide varieties of heresies that the leading bishops accused each other of, and the "OK, if you feel that way, you are no longer in communion with us" and how Imperial politics was intermeshed with some of this, being pushy and "I am right you are wrong" styles of rhetoric and discourse were normal. The whole position of rhetor and public speaker was to show ...
... "how right I am and {so and so} is not." The battle of rhetoric was rough. So yeah, given that the fight was still on amongst a lot of leaders in Christendom in the Empire, a modern softy characterizing any of them as a "bully" is no surprise.
 
1:28 PM
@KorvinStarmast Yes, I think in first 1-2 hundred years since Constantine, the Church (who has a lot of infighting within herself) is still experimenting with how to incorporate a new power variable (the Roman emperors) for the health and vitality of the Church to fulfill the Church's mission. And the climate of that era is a lot more paternalistic and authoritarian than the democratic and soft-authoritative tone of most churches today.
@KorvinStarmast I haven't read the book, but I presume that John Dickson would put out a working definition of a "bully". Regardless, I do believe that St. Ambrose behaved that way consistent with the culture at the time and when situation calls for it. Even today, I heard that in the Middle East, one cannot deal with authority figures like we do in the USA.
 
 
10 hours later…
11:05 PM
@curiousdannii When writing my latest answer I discovered the grave injustice in referring the 10-volume TDNT as the "Big Kittel", "Kittel's TDNT" or simply "The Kittel" as though Gerhard Kittel was the only editor of this famous work: here, here,
or here. When there is a second name, Geoffrey Bromiley (translator) was mentioned. But Gerhard Kittel edited only the first 4 volumes; the next 5 volumes plus the index volume was edited by Gerhard Friedrich (see picture).
At least Logos and CBD (well known US mailorder Christian bookseller) got it right, although still refers to the 1 volume abridged version as "Little Kittel".
 
11:48 PM
I think I remember Cyril of Alexandria also behaving very badly. Good theology, bad practice. Sadly way too common.
 

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