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2:40 AM
@GarethRees oh wow. How did you track it down?
 
3:03 AM
Considerably older than Victorian ...
 
3:22 AM
0
Q: Why does Prof. Van Helsing abort his plan to mutilate Lucy's body?

Time4TeaIn Chapter 13 of Dracula, after Lucy Westenra has died and they are making funeral plans, Prof. Van Helsing mentions to Jack Seward that he plans to secretly cut off Lucy's head and remove her heart. Although he doesn't provide much explanation, this is obviously because he suspects she has been ...

 
 
2 hours later…
5:38 AM
@DLosc Yes, you can type a custom reason which will appear in a comment on the question.
 
6:14 AM
Happy given day to all who celebrate! 🦘
 
 
4 hours later…
10:06 AM
 
 
5 hours later…
3:16 PM
@verbose I searched archive.org for "errata of the press as he". In the last couple of years, archive.org's OCR has got a lot better at recognizing the long ſ — it's much rarer that one needs to try expedients like "prefs"
 
3:29 PM
@Bookworm mutilating bodies in the HNQ
@GarethRees ooh clever. I didn’t know one could search for specific text across the entire archive. Thanks!
 
 
1 hour later…
4:49 PM
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Q: Does van Gulik's title "The Given Day" specifically mean February 29?

verboseRobert van Gulik's novel The Given Day (Kuala Lumpur: Art Printing Works, 1964) is set on February 29. The date is a crucial plot point, and through the course of the novel is referred to as "the given day." The way van Gulik uses the phrase, it appears that "given day" is a specific phrase for L...

 
 
3 hours later…
7:22 PM
@CowperKettle Your mentioning Elinor Wylie made me remember that I had a question about one of her poems, which I've now asked.
 
0
Q: Who is the "creature" in the final verses of this poem?

Peter ShorElinor Wylie's poem The Mountaineer's Ballad ends with the following two-and-a-half verses, which describe the eponymous mountaineer: Thinking maybe of marriages, And maybe of wars. And maybe of the creature That runs at his heel, Clad in rough velvet And shod with smooth steel; That runs foreve...

 
@PeterShor Those Edna St Vincent Mullay poems were very moving indeed. Thanks for sharing.
Meanwhile, Kazakhstan is testing your date and time code
And here are some observed 2024 leap day bugs
 
7:37 PM
@verbose: I originally meant only to link to the last one, Over the Hollow Land (which is my favorite), but the only place I could find it on the web contained the others. But that's probably just as well, since they're all great poems.
 
*Millay. Gah
If she were from Kuala Lumpur she'd be Edna St Vincent Malay
 

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