« first day (908 days earlier)   

3:26 PM
@Dissenter I think its time for @Martin to upthepunx a little bit... ;)
 
 
3 hours later…
6:31 PM
@LordStryker even my professor says that electrons pump in and pump out when describing resonance
Thinking about it more I'm not sure if it's that big of a deal at least for organic chemistry and biochemistry. It might be somewhat of a bigger deal now if someone said that in a theoretical chemistry or p-chem class
 
@Dissenter I don't really consider it a big deal. We teach young students that electrons are particles (or have for years anyway) when they aren't. Its hard to properly describe electrons and their behavior. We have to come up with our own analogies and none of them will be completely correct. Some are better than others yes but... it isn't easy.
 
@LordStryker Agreed
 
But yeah, at least his analogy makes me giggle a little bit. Thats a plus.
 
Lol
I would probably say something along the lines of parallel p orbitals which allows the electrons to be found among multiple nuclei; isn't it better to have more than one nuclei stabilizing electrons anyway?
Cuts to the chase and does away with the sex imagery
 
but sex man... it sells...
 
6:42 PM
Hehe
Yo do you know Ron's background?
He knows everything
he be dropping terms like symmetry element and be talking about point groups and I be lost
And what the fuck is a 1,2 synaxial attraction
 
@Dissenter I think users like @ron and @Philipp live outside the Matrix where they've uploaded everything to their brain. They pop into the Matrix every once in a while to help those of us that live here with chemistry problems.
 
This is the sexiest answer I've ever read
4
Q: Steric effects of a lone pair and piperidine

DissenterI know that in piperidine, the lone pair on the nitrogen can occupy either an axial or a equatorial position in the two chair forms. I also read that the axial position for the lone pair is preferred by a small margin in the gas phase (so intermolecular forces are minimized). Now, this was pr...

"Perhaps, like in the "how many angels can you draw on the head of a pin" question, the discussion around the question might be as significant as the answer."
What a line
 
Indeed.
It is unfortunate that his profile gives no indication about the man (or woman) behind the name.
 
7:09 PM
I wish I had ron as my prof
You can be the TA @LordStryker
 
HA!
I'm not the smartest of the bunch but I've been described as being very "relate-able" by my students.
 
 
1 hour later…
8:38 PM
@Martin can be the researcher
We have a university right there
 
9:11 PM
@Dissenter without funding we have jack squat :(
 
@LordStryker Martin can definitely handle the funding himself with his high productivity
And we can bring my German classmate to give Martin company; talk to him in German
 
@Dissenter Nah, @Martin is too busy working on finding the path to enlightenment. :P
 
and ron has already reached enlightment
following that seven fold path
 
@Dissenter @ron was born with it. molded by it.
 
He found a molecule with 7 axes of symetry
Wait that isn't that hard; cycloheptane fulfils that
Lol at the one guy who made fun of my prof who writes H3N
mimics prof "I've discovered H3N!"
 
9:29 PM
?
what is wrong with H3N?
 
10:14 PM
Lol nothing, it's just that some people don't like it since it's not conventional
Also @LordStryker is it just me but Orgo by Clayden shits over any orgo book I have ever read
I've never read something as clear and awesome
This book literally beats the shit out of anything else I've read (Wade, Brown, Klein, etc.)
 
I've never seen "Orgo' and 'clear' in two adjacent sentences :P
 
What's wrong with orgo ?
Clayden feels like it was written by God and speaks to me like Morgan Freeman
 
i dont get 'orgo' thats all
 
You didn't like orgo?
"NAD + and NADP both work by accepting a
hydrogen atom and a pair of electrons from another compound."
Doesn't that imply that both accept 3 (?!) electrons?
@LordStryker
 
10:41 PM
huh?
perhaps its a typo? generally these types of things are referred to as 'proton transfers', not h atom?
 
This is in the context of redox reactions
NAD+ is an oxidizing agent
 
Although its possible to have an empty atomic orbital and a singly occupied one on an atom which can in turn accept 3 electrons...
 
Oh noes
 
if we want to talk about valence bond theory that is...
 
I think the textbook author overlooked the fact that the statement could be construed as a 3-electron transfer since the H atom itself has an electron
Transferring H atom + 2 electrons = 3 electron transfer to NAD+
Perhaps the most accurate way to phrase it would be transfer of H+ proton with 2electrons
The electrons acting as glue to form the bond between NAD+ and H+
And no @LordStryker i wanna talk about charge-shift bond theory!!
 
10:52 PM
:(
i dont know what that is
would you like to hear about quantum mechanics and how it might save your life instead? ;)
 

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