« first day (1887 days earlier)   

7:53 AM
This Wikipedia page on ΙΧΘΥΣ states that Augustine noted that:
> the generating sentence " Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς [sic] Θεοῦ Υἱὸς Σωτήρ" has 27 letters, i.e. 3 x 3 x 3, which in that age indicated power. (This suggestion is obviously spurious, resulting from Augustine's ignorance of Greek.)
I don't follow how the number 27 arises from bad Greek (rather, it would appear, bad counting).
The Bagatti reference provided does not appear to be available online. Any ideas?
 
 
6 hours later…
1:50 PM
@Susan Well, bad something: it seems he's conflating the Greek sentence with a (quasi?) Latin form, so "ch" still counts as "1", but it isn't Χριστὸς but "chreistos" (so there's the extra letter). This is confirmed by the acrostic he cites. The Bettenson (Penguin) translation in City of God keeps it all in Latin, in fact.
 
2:05 PM
@Susan Bagatti is only being cited for support for the notion that Augustine didn't know Greek. This is pretty widely discussed, and is a bit misleading. See e.g. this paper @ n. 12, which in turn cites this book which is available full-text in Oxford Scholarship Online.
Compare, however, Peter Brown's assessment in his (justly) famous biography of Augustine, p. 24. (The bio is very well written: well worth a read. Airplane book?)
 

« first day (1887 days earlier)